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Thread: a question for a box for a 75lb drill press

  1. #1
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    a question for a box for a 75lb drill press

    If I build a simple box, approx 18 x24,30 inches total height put it on casters, do I need to add 2x4s as a frame, or would 3/4 plywood screwed and glued be sufficient to support the press without the top bellying in or being wobbly?
    I intend on mounting the castors on 2x4s, then attaching that to bottom piece of ply, and double sheet(2 pieces of 3/4 inch plywood) top surface supporting the press.

  2. #2
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    Assuming the 18" dimension is wide, I think the plywood would deflect under the load if it had no additional support other than the plywood sides and back. However, a 2x4 would be overkill. A 1 x 2 of a good strong hardwood like oak set on edge at the front edge of the cabinet, and 1 or 2 more directly under the load, would work well. IMHO
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  3. #3
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    Covering a 2X2 frame with plywood would allow you to put doors on, and shelves in, your box. Never can have too much storage space.



  4. #4
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    I tried something similar once upon a time. I ended up doubling the top (3/4" x 2) as it sagged under the weight. I think something as heavy as 2x is overkill though ;-)
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  5. #5
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    there isnt much between a 2x2 frame and a box without a frame.
    (only an inch and a half, hehehe, well, 3 inches counting both sides)
    Im going to go with Rennie, notch out a 1x2 on edge on front, middle and back,of top of walls only, put the plywood top on top of that, and just glue and screw the rest.
    Ill add a shelf in the middle for added support

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by allen levine View Post
    there isnt much between a 2x2 frame and a box without a frame.
    (only an inch and a half, hehehe, well, 3 inches counting both sides)
    Im going to go with Rennie, notch out a 1x2 on edge on front, middle and back,of top of walls only, put the plywood top on top of that, and just glue and screw the rest.
    Ill add a shelf in the middle for added support
    Allen - I did miss the fact that you were doubling the top sheet. Assuming you will laminate the two top sheets into a single 1 1/2" thick top you should not experience any sag without additional framing. Never-the-less, the oak trim would still be a nice touch
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  7. #7
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    laminate as in glue the top sheets together, yes, thats about all I would do.

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    Quote Originally Posted by allen levine View Post
    laminate as in glue the top sheets together, yes, thats about all I would do.
    I have 3 - 3/4" pieces laminated together for my combo planer/mortiser stand. It's about 20" wide and is supported only by a single steel rod that goes through the middle of the middle sheet. The combined weight of the machines is well over 100 lbs. no sagging... ever.
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  9. #9
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    I'd beef up the platform with a hardwood perimeter frame.

    Question: Where'd you get a floor mount drill press that only weighs 75 pounds? Both of mine are well over 100# - probably closer to 150 for the Shop Fox, and maybe 175~200 for the Powermatic.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  10. #10
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    Im sorry, I thought I mentionedl I purchased a table top delta dp300L
    I posted it in tools section, also purchased the delta mortiser kit.
    Overall shipping weight was 82 lbs, but then again the mortiser must weigh in at 10-15 lbs when all assembled and attached with fence.

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