Results 1 to 5 of 5

Thread: to buy or not buy, that is the question

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
    Posts
    11,827

    to buy or not buy, that is the question

    I like to prowl antique shops and flea markets. Since joining FW, I have seen much discussion about planes. Undoubtedly, there is great interest in securing old planes both for use and as collectibles. Personally, I'm not very interested in them. But, I do have an interest in trading or selling items in an attempt to make a small profit. As for planes, I don't know a desirable one from a runa da mill. Yesterday, I saw one that I was tempted to buy. It just looked highly collectible. But, that wasn't enough to make me part with a $20.00 bill. It was a wood body with iron inset/insert guts and blade. No name but had a replica Liberty Bell cast on the front hold-down gizzie.
    I'm thinking I need to buy a book on collecting planes and make notes on which are desirable. My instincts tell me I passed on something good. Dunno. Oh, well.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    583
    It's all in the details. What you were looking at is known as a "transitional" plane - hybrid between the iron bodied planes and the wooden bodied planes with the adjustment mechanism of the iron bodied planes. Price depends on rarity of that particular plane and completeness/condition.

    For rarity and general information on the various models and variations, i'd go to www.supertool.com and click on "patrick leaches blood and gore". This goes into some detail on Stanley's planes.

    The Liberty Bell planes were made by Stanley. They're not that rare and were not a premium product when they were made. They're somewhat collectable, but fairly easy to come by as well. Depending on the model (smoothers are the most common) and condition, $20 may have been a fair price - most likely not a bargain price. They fill a need spot in history, but aren't that valuable.

    The other thing to be aware of is that you won't likely find bargains on planes at antique dealers or even flea markets. Information on their rarity and value is very accessible - any dealer with access to a library or the internet will know exactly what they have and what it's worth.

    Also, i wouldn't dive into this endeavor without first doing a healthy amount of homework. I think to succeed, you'd need to understand the product better than those around you. Planes with broken or mismatched parts are quite common. If you're looking for a user, that's probably OK. If you're looking to peddle collectibles, this isn't the way to go. There are a number of nuanced differences used to date the planes and determine their type. Mismatched parts or parts modified to look like something they're not effect value significantly. Also, repaired parts may effect value and useability.

    There are a lot of people making a bit of money by peddling old planes. Many are not reliable. None of them will give you a true bargain.

    Paul Hubbman

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
    Posts
    11,827
    Thanks, Paul. That's interesting information and probably applicable to almost any type of collectible item. I may still make a short list of highly desired planes and carry with me. These days many antique 'shops' are really malls where space is rented to consignors who, in many cases, do not have expertise but are just clearing out junk from their homes. It'll be kinda the blind hog truffle hunt thing.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Oak Harbor Washington on Whidbey Island
    Posts
    3,134
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Hubbman View Post
    It's all in the details. What you were looking at is known as a "transitional" plane - hybrid between the iron bodied planes and the wooden bodied planes with the adjustment mechanism of the iron bodied planes. Price depends on rarity of that particular plane and completeness/condition.


    Paul Hubbman
    I have read several times that these planes were not really transitional but were actually manufactured after the iron bodied planes because of the initial resistance of the old-timers to iron bodied planes "they were just really attached to their woodies" & didn't take a liking to all that iron. Anyway thats what I've read & heard it may be right or wrong I don't really know.
    "Forget the flat stuff slap something on the spinny thing and lets go, we're burning daylight" Bart Leetch
    "If it ain't round you may be a knuckle dragger""Turners drag their nuckles too, they just do it at a higher RPM"Bart

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
    Posts
    11,827
    Quote Originally Posted by Bart Leetch View Post
    I have read several times that these planes were not really transitional but were actually manufactured after the iron bodied planes because of the initial resistance of the old-timers to iron bodied planes "they were just really attached to their woodies" & didn't take a liking to all that iron. Anyway thats what I've read & heard it may be right or wrong I don't really know.
    Must be sumptin' like guns. I still don't think those breech loading things will ever catch on.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •