Results 1 to 9 of 9

Thread: Turning opinions wanted

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    DSM, IA
    Posts
    5,719

    Turning opinions wanted

    I just stumbled upon this thread at SMC that discusses why most turners are inclined to go as thin as possible. I want to ask the same question here.

    Why are we obsessed with thin walls?

    As you've probably seen, lately I've been making some thick bowls after looking at lots of turning sites such as Mike Kaplan, Peter Andres, and many more. I enjoy anything related to turning, but I have grown very fond of thick bowls or "massives" as Ron Kent called his.

    I attended the local art festival a few weeks ago and there were artist from all over the country as well as 5 turners. All of them had absolutly beautiful hollow forms, vases and bowls that were feather light. Each of them said thank you when I complemented their work but added, "I'm very stressed", or "I'm having a heart attack" because the wind was strong and they thought there work would blow over and shatter....just thinking of another reason why thicker is better.

    Hoping for some good discussion here. thanks.
    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. -Henry David Thoreau
    My Website


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Vancouver
    Posts
    191
    I attended a demo by Todd Hoyer where he touched on this subject. He said that previously, thin was 'in' but he's gone the total opposite, turning really thick pieces, even going further and only turning pieces that he's let dry out and crack up before turning.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    DSM, IA
    Posts
    5,719
    Quote Originally Posted by Gari Biasillo View Post
    I attended a demo by Todd Hoyer where he touched on this subject. He said that previously, thin was 'in' but he's gone the total opposite, turning really thick pieces, even going further and only turning pieces that he's let dry out and crack up before turning.
    Gari, Todd Hoyer is another turner that got me hooked on thick pieces.

    What do YOU think?
    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. -Henry David Thoreau
    My Website


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Vancouver
    Posts
    191
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Bower View Post
    What do YOU think?
    I think that once you've done one, that's enough Binh Pho's thin walled turnings are great but I personally wouldn't want to turn pieces that thin. I personally prefer pieces with a bit of 'uumph'

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
    Posts
    11,833
    I belive we are conditioned to relate thin walls with high levels of skill. I have pieces of thin stuff laying all around the shop to prove that theory.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    DSM, IA
    Posts
    5,719
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Fusco View Post
    I...I have pieces of thin stuff laying all around the shop to prove that theory.
    You and me both.
    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. -Henry David Thoreau
    My Website


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,020
    I suspect a lot of people try to get things as thin as possible for bragging rights, and to impress other turners. Personally, I like a little substance to most of my pieces. Aside from a few very particular collectors, I doubt the general buying public really cares if a hollow form as 1/16" wall or 1/2" walls, as long as the form is pleasing to their eye. I've said before that I've never had a potential customer pick up one of my pieces and say "This is nice, but it's just a bit too heavy for my shelf." On the other side of the argument, it's interesting to see people's reaction when they pick up a hollow form and discover that it's lighter than they expected.

    With bowls, I think most people want enough apparent thickness to actually make the bowl useful. I feel the form and finish are more important than making it as thin as possible. I think people want a bit of heft in most bowls.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Goodland, Kansas
    Posts
    4,834
    At the symposium I attended a demo by Larry Hasiak and Al Stirt. Larry said everyone should try hollowing a HF thru a 1/2" hole with 1/8" walls and turn a bowl with 1/8" walls. He said get it out of your system, be done with it and move on. He said his HF's and bowls are generally no thinner than 1/4". Al Stirt touched on the same thing and pretty much said what Larry said. Do a thin one of each and hollow thru a small hole then move on. He says I like bowls with a little heft to them and probably never go thinner than 1/4".
    Bernie W.

    Retirement: Thats when you return from work one day
    and say, Hi, Honey, Im home forever.

    To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Location
    Benson, Arizona
    Posts
    34
    I like my bowls about 1/2" thick, I've done some thin ones, but prefer 1/2". HF I do like thin, last week did some miniature HF one about the size of a dime and thin. It depends on the form, function, and purpose of the product I'm turning. It is nice to see that everyone doesn't like the same thing, it would be a boring world if they did. I turn for fun only, I'm sure it must stress a lot of production turners to turn thin. It just a piece of wood and my time both are cheap! The reason I like going thin is it takes all your attention, you can't be thinking about anything other than the cut. Thats my Zen time...love it...Bruce

    My feeling is if you like it, its great, thick, thin, color, plain, turquoise, burnt, carved, what ever...everyone has different tastes.Thats what makes the world go around. I get a lot of enjoyment trying new things, sometimes I like them, sometimes I don't.
    Always like learning something new!

Similar Threads

  1. opinions about TRITON router wanted
    By Dewayne Baker in forum New Tools
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 11-24-2008, 08:30 PM
  2. Draped table opinions wanted!!
    By Toni Ciuraneta in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 07-02-2008, 02:56 PM
  3. opinions wanted!
    By larry merlau in forum Finishing School
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06-23-2008, 09:57 PM
  4. Checker Board - Opinions Wanted
    By John Whittaker in forum Flatwork Project Showcase
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 08-22-2007, 01:51 PM
  5. Opinions Wanted
    By Dave Richards in forum Designs, Plans and Sketches
    Replies: 34
    Last Post: 05-04-2007, 03:24 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •