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Thread: how to rip 6' board

  1. #1
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    Question how to rip 6' board

    Hi, I am completely lost. I want to rip with 45 degree angle 6 feet board and the same time mitering each side to 7 degree. I need 4 boards to build a floor lamp. I think I need a support board against my fence and cutting peace on this board? Questions are how to hold a cutting peace and how to make precise cut?
    Would appreciate any idea, thank you. Ed

  2. #2
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    I did something similar building some 4.5' taper columns with 45 degree cuts. I built a pair of sleds so they would all be the same. But they were compound angles, not just one tapered side.

    In your case, I would just set up some feather boards to make sure that the board stayed against the fence. Shouldn't be that hard. Oh yea, be sure to have an outfeed to keep it from lifting.
    God grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway,
    the good fortune to run into the ones I do,
    and the eyesight to tell the difference.


    Kudzu Craft Lightweight Skin on frame Kayaks.
    Custom built boats and Kits

  3. #3
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    thanks for advice, but I did not explain correctly. I am building like tapering column. Both side need to be cut at 45 and tapered at 7 degrees.
    Ed.

  4. #4
    Ed...

    Never did that, but an interesting problem. What comes to mind is a taper jig sled to provide the 7 degree taper married to a blade tilt of 45. It seems that the problem will be everything coming together with no gaps. So you probably need two sleds, as Jeff mentioned, or some way to feed the mating parts so that any error cancels. I would ask Jeff to elaborate on his two-sled solution...that may provide some insight. No matter how careful you are, you probably won't get the blade tilted to exactly 45...but if you cut one part on one side of the blade and the mating part on the other side of the blade (ie, two sleds) the total angle will be 90 regardless of what the individual angles are. And of course each sled has to be capable of a 7 degree taper. 6 feet is a lot of length to keep aligned. Good support and a lot of luck.

    Might be less stressful to redesign the lamp.

    Cheers.

  5. #5
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    I may me incorrect here, but I think a fairly standard taper jig would work.

    http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?p...er=taper%20jig

    You'd need something longer than the one in the link, but it shouldn't be too hard to make such a jig. Also, you could cut the edges at 90, then use a chamfer bit on a router table to get the 45 edges.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
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  6. #6
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    I would feel more comfortable using a sled with stop blocks for accuracy and hold downs for safety than with a standard taper jig (like the Rockler) on a tablesaw. That jig would be OK on a bandsaw, with the table tilted to hold the work and jig to the fence.

    Charles Neil has a video showing a safer taper jig and its use: http://www.antiquesbuiltdaily.com/tips.htm



    Ignore this part if you don't like to over analyze things:
    If it's tapered, the bevel will need to be a very little bit narrower than 45 degrees. Something like 44.79 degrees ( = tan^-1(cos(7)) ). Seen from the top, it does need to be 45, but that view foreshortens the sides a bit, making the angle look wider. By the way, the numbers given assume that 7 degrees is the tilt of a face from vertical. If it's the taper angle, there's another correction of this type to make, but that's an even smaller change: 7.05 degrees ( = sin^-1(tan(7)) ). That leads to a bevel of 44.78 degrees: the same, as I can't measure less than 1/10 degree. I guess this really means you might as well go for 45, and clean any deviations up after the cut.

  7. #7
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    Since the 45 degree bevels will be on both sides, I think it would be easier to cut the taper first and create the 45 bevels on the router table.

    Ted

  8. #8
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    Eduard, actually you were clear, I was just skimming the posts and missed what you were asking. I just reread yours before reading the other replies and I caught it.

    this subject comes up on different forums about every 6 months. I need to take the time to detail my method. Of course there are a lot of ways to do this. I prefer the sled because it worked for me.

    Essentially what you need it something that will hold the part steady at 7 degrees to the fence and then tilt the blade to 45 degree. As was stated it's not exactly 45 but I think it will be close enough on that taper.

    I just took a larger piece of luan ply I had laying around and straighted one edge that would go against the fence. Then I carefully marked my 7 degree (or whatever mine was) on there. I found it simpler for me to work with a slope. So I converted my angle to 1/2" rise per foot of length (or what ever that works out too) and use a carpenters framing square. That was easier for me.

    Then once I got my lines marked, I just added a few scrap blocks to push the blank up against. These were just scraps! Nothing fancy. Think drywall screws and scraps off the floor. Be sure and put blocks on a side and bottom so that you put each part in the same place!! Now that gives you the first sled.

    The second one is the same principle but it's different. Now you going to be locating/registering off the previous cut 7 degree angle. So now you have to double the slope or set the part at a 14 degree angle from the cut side. It is still 7 degrees from the center line. (confused yet?) You also need to keep in mind where the 45 is. If I remember right I had to run the second part upside down compared to the first cut.

    The simplest thing is if you have a bandsaw or with a handsaw even is to cut out a part to look at. Just a small piece and it doesn't have to accurate or even close. It just gives you something to hold in your hand and visualize what you need to do. How it should look sitting on the table saw sled. It will help you visualize the way the jig needs to be.

    This is not a complex jig at all. It just takes some thinking to have it in your minds eye first. When I built mine I took a sharpie and marked "1st cut-face down. "2nd cut face up and upside down" etc so that I didn't mess up when I cut the final pieces. I marked several items on mine so I didn't have to rethink it.

    I have made two sets of tapered columns and this is the last set I made for inside the house. Thinking through the cuts took longer than actually building them did.

    Last edited by Jeff Horton; 08-07-2008 at 09:03 PM.
    God grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway,
    the good fortune to run into the ones I do,
    and the eyesight to tell the difference.


    Kudzu Craft Lightweight Skin on frame Kayaks.
    Custom built boats and Kits

  9. #9
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    Oh yea, I still have the sleds if you need photos. There not much to look at but I just never wanted to scrap them after all the head scratching took to make them.
    God grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway,
    the good fortune to run into the ones I do,
    and the eyesight to tell the difference.


    Kudzu Craft Lightweight Skin on frame Kayaks.
    Custom built boats and Kits

  10. #10
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    Guys thank you for your input.
    Vaughn, I do have this Rockler taper jig, but it very short and I don't think it is a save for a long board.
    Jeff, I would really appreciate a pictures of your jig. I understand an idea of it, but pictures are better to build it.
    Ed.

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