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Thread: Oversized DNA Tub

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    ABQ NM
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    Oversized DNA Tub

    As I've mentioned a few times here, I rigged this up after my turned pieces started exceeding the size of my 5 gallon DNA bucket. Prior to making this, I would soak oversized pieces in a heavy garbage bag sitting on a box or large dishpan. It was always a hassle emptying the DNA from the bag when done, so I wanted something a bit more permanent.

    I bought a large plastic tub from Target, but it needed a lid that would seal.

    To make the lid, I used a pre-cut 3/4" plywood disk that's sold at the borg as a cheap table top. It started out at 30" in diameter, but I mounted it on a faceplate and trimmed it to size on the lathe. (The dropped extension bed and 38" swing on the PM was very handy for this step.) Sorry, no pics of that step. The final diameter was sized to fit just above the first "ledge" in the side of the tub. (You'll see the ledge I'm talking about in one of the later pics.)

    Next, I put a few coats of water-based poly on the disk to seal it. No pics of that, either.

    Then I mounted it back on the lathe, and attached self-adhesive weatherstripping to the edge. The lathe was used only as a handy place to hold the disk on edge while I stuck the weatherstripping on.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Here's a close-up shot of the weatherstripping. It has dual seals on it:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    I added a couple of handles, and it was ready to put on the tub. I soon discovered, though, that it was hard to push the lid down evenly, since it trapped air in the tub, and tended to want to rock to one side or the other. Time for Plan B.

    I added a galvanized pipe flange (or whatever that part is called), drilled a hole in the lid, and sealed the joint between the wood and the flange well. Then I added a small length of 1/2" pipe, a ball valve, and a quick-connect air fitting. You can see the ledge in the side of the tub right above the white label. The lid sits on top of that ledge:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    The pipe acts as a vent. It lets air out when I'm putting the lid on, and it allows air in when I'm pulling the lid off. I put the quick-connect fitting on it to allow me to attach my vacuum pump, although in use, I've found that to be unnecessary. I can just push the lid on slowly with the valve open, then when it hits the ledge in the tub, I close the valve. the suction fit at that point is very strong...I could probably lift the whole tub (including a few gallons of DNA) just by lifting the handles on the lid. With the valve open though, the lid lifts off without a whole lot of tugging.

    Here's a better view of the plumbing:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    And one last shot, showing how it normally looks in my shop, complete with heavy rubber gloves for reaching into the DNA.

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    One trick I used to minimize the amount of DNA I need is to place chunks of concrete in the tub, either on the sides of the piece, or in the case of a bowl, inside the piece. This helps raise the liquid level in the tub, much like putting a brick in your toilet tank to conserve water. The concrete also comes in handy for weighting down pieces that want to float in the DNA.

    So...that's how I do it. Hopefully, this will give others some usable ideas.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
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    15,807
    I use rocks to weigh down my stuff, and to raise the DNA level, I was using old bolts etc, but they all rusted and made a mess, so I stopped doing that.

    Great idea, with the lid etc, well done, that is really slick!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    ABQ NM
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    30,017
    I would have used rocks, but didn't have any handy in the yard. But...the previous owner of our house used broken chunks of concrete sidewalk for a few landscaping walls around the yard, so I swiped a few chunks from there. Someday if I think about it, I'll go down to the river in the canyon about 1/4 of a mile away from the house and get some nice round river rocks.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    13,450
    Ok, another ahha moment for me... but what is DNA? Tried to search, but too short of a word...kinda like searching for Table Saw, just returns a search of Table as Saw is dropped.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Lakeport NY and/or the nearest hotel
    Posts
    5,533
    DNA= denatured alcohol.


    I'm not 'quite' in the spinny club all the way yet, but I share what I know.
    -Ned

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Phoenix, AZ
    Posts
    112
    Vaughn, thanks for posting. Great idea with the valve and all. Much appreciated.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Drums, PA
    Posts
    292
    I used to work in a darkroom where we mixed 10 gallons of developer at a time. (B&W Photography) If developer is exposed to air it deteriorates very quickly and would be dead within 24 hours.

    Using a SS tank with a SS floating lid the developer would stay fresh until it was used up.

    So, your idea as plenty of merit and works.

    BTW, I use a plastic floating lid from flat PVC sheets for my DNA.
    Check a sign shop to see if they have any scraps they are willing to sell you.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Central NY State
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    3,374
    Purple bucket. Nice, Vaughn.

    Ken

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
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    Quote Originally Posted by ken werner View Post
    Purple bucket. Nice, Vaughn.

    Ken
    Matches the compressor!

    http://familywoodworking.org/forums/...ght=compressor
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
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    30,017
    Quote Originally Posted by ken werner View Post
    Purple bucket. Nice, Vaughn.

    Ken
    Quote Originally Posted by Darren Wright View Post
    And the dust collector:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

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