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Thread: The new floor - Week 5 already!

  1. #1
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    The new floor - Week 5 already!

    I stopped by the local Lumber Liquidators today and placed a deposit on the flooring the LOML and I will be installing over the Labor Day weekend (and probably a few days more). We had reached a tie on the species (if you can call laminate a species ). We were going for the Buckingham Oak, but they were out of stock and the transit time (trains - trucks are now too expensive) for a special order put our installation date in jeopardy. So, since they had bunches of our second choice, Embassy Mahogany, we went with that.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Actually, now that I look at it a little more, I'm rather happy they were out of the oak! This floor will look great holding up my Green & Green furniture that I'm going to build someday!

    We start this week ripping up the carpet that we have come to despise over the years. Once that is up I'll spend quite a few hours breaking in the "Chuck-O-Matic" screw gun. The builders must have been short on nails when they put our house up. In re-flooring other rooms I've found 4 x 8 sheets of particle board underlayment with as few as 12 nails! So, the first thing I'll do once the carpet is up is to snap a 12 x 12 grid on the floor and put screws in 12" OC in the field, 6" OC on the perimeter. This should also help with our very squeaky floors - 2 x 6 T&G over post & beam. I figure that I'll probably use over 700 screws.

    What concerns me more is that in other rooms of the house the floor drops about a 1/4" to 3/8" within a foot of exterior walls. It does not seem as bad in the living room, but it's hard to tell with the carpet. Once I'm looking at the sub floor, I'll know or sure.

    I promise, there will be pictures!
    Last edited by Rennie Heuer; 09-20-2008 at 06:58 PM.
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  2. #2
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    Rennie, now I see why you put off the fence rebuild and kitchen remodel...you have a few other projects to get done first. Looking forward to the picture trail....
    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. -Henry David Thoreau
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  3. #3
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    Looks like a nice color Rennie. Also sounds like a great excuse to get yourself a new shop-vac. We've got hardwoods through-out our house and we had the house piped for the central vac, but haven't every installed the unit. I had started using my 20 gallon shop-vac to clean the floors 6 years ago. So far it's worked out just fine and my wife doesn't really care about spending the $1200 for the central vac unit.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darren Wright View Post
    Looks like a nice color Rennie. Also sounds like a great excuse to get yourself a new shop-vac. We've got hardwoods through-out our house and we had the house piped for the central vac, but haven't every installed the unit. I had started using my 20 gallon shop-vac to clean the floors 6 years ago. So far it's worked out just fine and my wife doesn't really care about spending the $1200 for the central vac unit.
    Hmmmmm..... Something to keep in mind. We have a 'part' collie who's one goal in life seems to be to shed his entire coat at least once a month.
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  5. #5
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    OK - first snag. We've given much thought to laying the floor out at 45 degrees to the walls (a la Gamble house ). I knew we would be likely to have more waste and a lot more cuts. That part did not bother me too much. However, I also knew we might run into clearance problems trying to tip up the individual planks (in order to lock them together) along the wall when the angle is cut so that the wider part of the plank is away from the installed section it's snapping into.

    Is that clear?

    Won't the point of the angle hit the wall preventing us - maybe - to tilt the plank back far enough to lock it in? I've looked around at several website and can't find any that give tips on how to install at a 45.

    Anyone out there have any experience in this area?
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  6. #6
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    Last summer i installed a new 3/4" white oak t&g floor in the ground level of our house. The subfloor was off by an inch and a half in some areas, so i tore up sections of the diagonal plank sublfoor, sistered in new joists to level things up, and installed new subflooring. I also put in many hundreds of ring shank nails and screws to tighten up the remaining original subfloor. Then came the felt paper and installation. I'd never done one before, but with narrow plank flooring (1-1/2" wide), it took several days to get the floor down.
    Driving the last nail was a proud moment. After the finish was on, it looked great.
    Have fun with it. Hope all goes well.
    paulh

  7. #7
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    We'll be spending the weekend doing the same thing. Only ours is engineered red oak that gets stapled down. We're only doing one room, but I'm figuring 1/2 day to remove the old carpet and the 1M staples holding down the padding, 1 day to install the floor, and a 1/2 day to put the trim back around the doors and install shoe molding. Then 1 day lying around in pain.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rennie Heuer View Post

    Won't the point of the angle hit the wall preventing us - maybe - to tilt the plank back far enough to lock it in? I've looked around at several website and can't find any that give tips on how to install at a 45.

    Anyone out there have any experience in this area?
    Rennie,

    Nope, never tried that. I *have* built a floor to ceiling cabinet that fit just fine, but couldn't be installed because I couldn't tip the darn thing up to get it in place. Does that count?

    If I understand correctly, it sounds like half the floor would be easy, but the other half....

    It could be that the lack of web info means it's not a problem, *or* that no one does it that way because it's impossible...

    So here's my extremely silly idea. Are you ready to laugh?

    You could lay one (or two or three or four) widths all round the edges of the room, making a kind of frame. Since no room I've ever seen is actually square,
    you might have to rip a couple lengths at a slight angle to make the inside of the frame square, but then you'd have clearence and a great look to the floor.

    The whole thing would be an awful lot of trouble, turning what is essentially a simple carpentry project into a woodworking project. But it would also be fun, and nobody in your neighborhood would have a floor like that!

    Thanks,

    Bill

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Lantry View Post
    Rennie,So here's my extremely silly idea. Are you ready to laugh?

    You could lay one (or two or three or four) widths all round the edges of the room, making a kind of frame. Since no room I've ever seen is actually square,
    you might have to rip a couple lengths at a slight angle to make the inside of the frame square, but then you'd have clearence and a great look to the floor.

    The whole thing would be an awful lot of trouble, turning what is essentially a simple carpentry project into a woodworking project. But it would also be fun, and nobody in your neighborhood would have a floor like that!

    Thanks,

    Bill
    Not really that silly at all. It would look nice. The problem I see is that I'm not sure how I would connect the border to the individual planks - no locking lip on the 45 cut ends.
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Hubbman View Post
    Last summer i installed a new 3/4" white oak t&g floor in the ground level of our house. The subfloor was off by an inch and a half in some areas, so i tore up sections of the diagonal plank sublfoor, sistered in new joists to level things up, and installed new subflooring. I also put in many hundreds of ring shank nails and screws to tighten up the remaining original subfloor. Then came the felt paper and installation. I'd never done one before, but with narrow plank flooring (1-1/2" wide), it took several days to get the floor down.
    Driving the last nail was a proud moment. After the finish was on, it looked great.
    Have fun with it. Hope all goes well.
    paulh
    WOW - I hope I don't need to rip up any subflooring! Sounds like you got a lot more than you bargained for.

    Quote Originally Posted by Matt Meiser View Post
    We'll be spending the weekend doing the same thing. Only ours is engineered red oak that gets stapled down. We're only doing one room, but I'm figuring 1/2 day to remove the old carpet and the 1M staples holding down the padding, 1 day to install the floor, and a 1/2 day to put the trim back around the doors and install shoe molding. Then 1 day lying around in pain.
    Sounds like you have the schedule down pat..... except for the last part. I'd allow at least 2 days!
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