Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20

Thread: Built in Storage - Work in Progress - Update #1

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Vancouver
    Posts
    191

    Built in Storage - Work in Progress - Update #1

    I've had a built-in storage project on my 'to do' list for over a year but had never had the time to do it. Until now, that is. My wife and 2 1/2 yr old son are visiting Japan for two months, visiting relatives and friends, and generally having fun, while I'm stuck here working and paying the bills

    Disclaimer: I haven't done any serious flat work for years (I fell into the bottomless pit of lathe-land!), so you'll see lots of errors, and imperfect work!

    Here's the alcove that needs the storage. Usually a dresser of some sort would got here but I'm going for something different.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC02769.JPG 
Views:	32 
Size:	27.5 KB 
ID:	23240

    I've built the carcasses for the two main storage cabinets. The first is tall, which will house the vacuum cleaner, and has a little cubby hole at the top. I'll put some ply later: maybe some painted peg board? The left panel is Walnut ply, already finished with shellac and WOP.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC02759.JPG 
Views:	32 
Size:	33.0 KB 
ID:	23241

    To the left, is the main cabinet. Three draws will go in the bottom, two sliding doors in the center, and two sets of two sliding doors at the top. The top is Walnut, and the inside shelving is Mahogany, which saves a bit of $$$ and the contrast should look nice IMO.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC02760.JPG 
Views:	41 
Size:	34.7 KB 
ID:	23242

    It was a tight squeeze but it fits! Oops! I dinged the wall!

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC02761.JPG 
Views:	28 
Size:	44.0 KB 
ID:	23243Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC02762.JPG 
Views:	41 
Size:	36.3 KB 
ID:	23244

    I used plugs to fill the screw holes, which is a first for me. The top bungs will end up being hidden (more on that later) but the inside ones will be visible: the contrasting Walnut/Mahogany should look nice when the finish is applied.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC02763.JPG 
Views:	20 
Size:	43.2 KB 
ID:	23245Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC02764.JPG 
Views:	25 
Size:	36.7 KB 
ID:	23246

    I plan on putting a plywood back on the main cabinet but I'm not sure what to do about the socket on the wall, so I'm looking for some advice...

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC02765.JPG 
Views:	47 
Size:	37.8 KB 
ID:	23247Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC02766.JPG 
Views:	21 
Size:	22.3 KB 
ID:	23248

    Should I just cover it up, cut a whole in the back so I can access it if need be, or something else?

    Next up - the face frames. I'll post a follow up when that part of the project is complete.

    Thanks for looking!
    -Gari
    Last edited by Gari Biasillo; 09-04-2008 at 04:04 PM. Reason: Update #1

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Vancouver
    Posts
    191
    It's in the dining room, so I doubt we'll need it for anything. Maybe a lamp? We'll store my wife's craft supplies, and misc. stuff in there, no electronics. I don't want to mess with the wiring. I'm leaning towards just cutting a hole in the back of the cabinet for access.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    13,450
    Personally I'd cut a hole for it. Never know what you might end up doing down the road (or someone else for that matter). Wouldn't have to put all the stuff out to put it in later.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Pennsylvania
    Posts
    361
    I don't know what the code is in your area but I was told that you CANNOT just cover it up. Your local hardware store or electrical supply house should have something called an extender. It'll extend the box out the width of the plywood & you can just attach the outlet to that. If you really don't like an outlet there, purchase or fabricate a removable cover for it. It must remain accessible.

    Here's a thread on SMC where I asked the same question...
    http://www.sawmillcreek.org/showthre...hlight=mudroom

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Alexandria, Virginia
    Posts
    1,071
    Rob beat me to it, but he is right, you can't 'just' cover a live outlet. I'm also with the others, best to cut access holes in the back of the shelves for future use. Rockler (and others) sells grommets.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Vancouver
    Posts
    191
    Thanks you all for the info. I wasn't really keen on covering it up, so yes, I'll be cutting an access hole. And thanks for the grommet link - I didn't even think of them but I think I'll add a couple to the top just in case.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    Looks good so far Gari!

    I've asked my Dad about the plug in the wall, he was a provincial electrical inspector in BC for about 30 years, so I'm sure I'll get the right answer for you!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Vancouver
    Posts
    191
    Thanks Stu. I'm sure the guys advice here is right (it sounds unsafe to just cover up a socket) but would be great to hear it from a pro from the same province that I live in.

    Another option could be to simply not have a back on the cabinet. I'll be securing it with screws to the left end right, so it should hold up well.

    BTW - I'm not sure if I posted this to the correct forum, so please move if it's not!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    Here you go Gari..........

    Quote Originally Posted by Stu's Dad
    Stuart:
    The outlet is required to remain accessible, which would require an access through the back of the cabinet. Remove the receptacle and install a blank cover. Like you state; With a hole in the back of the cabinet. If the larger area showing the plug location would be to accommodate a TV or stereo equipment the plug could remain as is. The whole idea is to be able to determine there is an electrical outlet there. Imagine if there was a problem with that circuit and trying to determine where that problem may be.

    Dad
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Vancouver
    Posts
    191
    Thanks! and please pass on my thanks to your dad!

    I spend some time making the face frame for the cabinet. I wanted dovetailed joints, which I accomplished with my router that I have mounted in my TS wing. the added benefit of mounting on the TS is that you can reuse the fence.

    The pins are easiest - just push the rails through in one pass. I bit of fuzzies was left behind but nothing a bit of sandpaper can't fix.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC02776.JPG 
Views:	24 
Size:	79.6 KB 
ID:	23316Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC02777.JPG 
Views:	19 
Size:	44.1 KB 
ID:	23317

    The tails are a little more involved but easy enough with a jig. Fist pass...
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC02770.JPG 
Views:	22 
Size:	90.8 KB 
ID:	23312Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC02772.JPG 
Views:	16 
Size:	49.0 KB 
ID:	23313

    Second pass...
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC02774.JPG 
Views:	15 
Size:	80.7 KB 
ID:	23314Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC02775.JPG 
Views:	14 
Size:	50.7 KB 
ID:	23315

    I also routed dados in the middle rails for the sliding doors. Here's a picture of the rails and styles ready to be assembled...
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC02778.JPG 
Views:	21 
Size:	81.8 KB 
ID:	23318

    I biscuit joined the frame to the case, clamped it all up...
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	DSC02780.JPG 
Views:	42 
Size:	66.9 KB 
ID:	23319

    Now, in my first post, I said that I'd make mistakes...and did! The eagle-eyed among us will notice that I completely forgot to make the styles for the top divider and bottom draw dividers! I'll have to just glue them in later. Oh well, shouldn't look to bad...I hope!

    Next up? Not sure yet - either the doors for the cabinet or the frame for the tall cabinet, depending on which takes my fancy.

Similar Threads

  1. Built in Linen storage - Finished
    By Rennie Heuer in forum Flatwork Project Showcase
    Replies: 31
    Last Post: 03-14-2014, 09:54 PM
  2. Need sketch up help Update Bookcase built
    By Bob Gibson in forum Designs, Plans and Sketches
    Replies: 54
    Last Post: 02-11-2014, 02:48 AM
  3. My doghouse the wife built update
    By Alan Bienlein in forum Shop Tours
    Replies: 35
    Last Post: 11-25-2012, 02:55 PM
  4. shop built wood storage rack, stationary.
    By Jim O'Dell in forum Carpentry and Construction
    Replies: 13
    Last Post: 12-06-2010, 04:27 PM
  5. ?s on my built in work bench assembly.
    By Jim O'Dell in forum Carpentry and Construction
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 04-23-2007, 11:39 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •