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Thread: setting up a Woverine

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    setting up a Woverine

    I am in the process of setting up a Wolverine sharpening jig. I bought it from Ed Gerhard. I thought he said is was used, but except for not having packing, it looks brand new. There is a definite learning curve with this item. Today, I'll try to make those wood setting gauges for a couple of my tools. Ran into a bit of a problem. I had to rearrange my grinding/sharpening station to set this up. To do that, I had to reverse the sharpening wheel on the motor. As I put it on, I notice that the arbor is slightly larger than the shaft causing some off-centerdness (is that a word? ). Enneyhow, it doesn't run perfect. I did use the diamond dresser to smooth up the face of the wheel. That made a big difference. I hadn't really examined that for a long time. Wadda mess. Question is: Would it be practical to put tape or something on the shaft to make the wheel arbor snug? What to do? BTW, my ancient Crafstman motor runs at 1750 rpm. Recommended is 3450. Is that a big issue? I am not really anxious to start shopping for a new motor.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails wolverine.jpg  

  2. #2
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    Frank,
    I believe they make a sleeve to go over the shaft. If the wheel isn't snug you run the risk of it exploding even though you did the dressing. I can check with my local Ace hardware. Also, unless Wolverine changed something it looks like you only got half the base unit. Mine has a holder for each side of the grinder. I run mine on a $29 low speed grinder with no problems. One thing I do is color the bevel with magic marker so I can tell when I have done the whole edge. Did you get the skew attachment? If not, I have the pieces to make them. Slow day with access to a water jet cutter and a really good brakeman.
    Dale

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dale Johnson View Post
    Frank,
    I believe they make a sleeve to go over the shaft. If the wheel isn't snug you run the risk of it exploding even though you did the dressing. I can check with my local Ace hardware. Also, unless Wolverine changed something it looks like you only got half the base unit. Mine has a holder for each side of the grinder. I run mine on a $29 low speed grinder with no problems. One thing I do is color the bevel with magic marker so I can tell when I have done the whole edge. Did you get the skew attachment? If not, I have the pieces to make them. Slow day with access to a water jet cutter and a really good brakeman.
    Dale
    I got the whole works, just not in the picture.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Fusco View Post
    [...]I notice that the arbor is slightly larger than the shaft causing some off-centerdness (is that a word? ). Enneyhow, it doesn't run perfect.[...]
    Are you looking for "runout"?

    I have the same problem. I replaced one of the original gray wheels on my 6" Delta with a Norton white wheel. The hole in the wheel was significantly larger than the shaft, so I inserted one of the plastic sleeves that came with the wheel. Still, I get a lot of vibration. I've been too lazy to do anything about it, but if tape isn't a definite no-no maybe I'll try that.

    Another option: Turn a better-fitting wooden sleeve! Bad idea?


    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Fusco View Post
    BTW, my ancient Crafstman motor runs at 1750 rpm. Recommended is 3450. Is that a big issue?
    Are you sure you didn't get those numbers backwards? If your "ancient Craftsman" really runs at 1750, keep it! Unless maybe it's an 8" grinder. They say that an 8", 1750 (slow-speed) grinder is preferred, to avoid burning your tools. But if you have a 6" high-speed grinder (like I do) it's not too bad ... you just need to use a lighter touch.

    Wheel Surface Speed in feet-per-minute
    Code:
                  1750 RPM      3450 RPM
                  -----------------------
    6"  wheel  |  2749 fpm      5419 fpm
    8"  wheel  |  3665 fpm      7225 fpm
    One nice thing about the 8" wheels is that they last longer, but if you already have a 6" grinder....

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry Burton View Post
    Are you looking for "runout"?

    I have the same problem. I replaced one of the original gray wheels on my 6" Delta with a Norton white wheel. The hole in the wheel was significantly larger than the shaft, so I inserted one of the plastic sleeves that came with the wheel. Still, I get a lot of vibration. I've been too lazy to do anything about it, but if tape isn't a definite no-no maybe I'll try that.

    Another option: Turn a better-fitting wooden sleeve! Bad idea?




    Are you sure you didn't get those numbers backwards? If your "ancient Craftsman" really runs at 1750, keep it! Unless maybe it's an 8" grinder. They say that an 8", 1750 (slow-speed) grinder is preferred, to avoid burning your tools. But if you have a 6" high-speed grinder (like I do) it's not too bad ... you just need to use a lighter touch.

    Wheel Surface Speed in feet-per-minute
    Code:
                  1750 RPM      3450 RPM
                  -----------------------
    6"  wheel  |  2749 fpm      5419 fpm
    8"  wheel  |  3665 fpm      7225 fpm
    One nice thing about the 8" wheels is that they last longer, but if you already have a 6" grinder....
    What I know about recommended sharpening speeds, from friends, experts, forums, etc., is that 1750 is preferred.
    However, Wolverine says that 3450 is their recommendation. That is what I was referring to. Doesn't make sense to me. BTW, I do use an 8".

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Fusco View Post
    What I know about recommended sharpening speeds, from friends, experts, forums, etc., is that 1750 is preferred.
    However, Wolverine says that 3450 is their recommendation. That is what I was referring to. Doesn't make sense to me.
    Yeah, I noticed that recommendation in the Wolverine setup instructions, too. I used it to calm my "gotta get a new grinder" fears ... but just barely.

    It's been a while since I set up my Wolverine jig ... do they actually recommend 3450 over 1750? Or could the 3450 recommendation just be a leftover from the "interim" days when the only choices were high-speed grinder vs Tormek? (You wouldn't want to use the Wolverine with a Tormek! )

  7. #7
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    May 2007
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    Frank,
    I also use a Woodcraft 8' Slow (1725rpm) grinder & it works perfect. I don't think I would trust myself using a 3450 rpm to quick to make a mistake also to screw up a tool. I would rather go slow & get good results.

    I know a lot of the pros use 3450 rpm that's what their comfortable with they have to sharpen & get back to turning quickly we don't. Why does Oneway suggest 3450

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