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Thread: Thanks Jeff Horton and update on the electrical

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    Thanks Jeff Horton and update on the electrical

    Jeff - thanks for the woodworkers site and advice - i contacted them yesterday and they said they can rebuild the guides and if not would ship them back and or sell me replacements if they could not be repaired or if it was to expensive. So im going to ship off both the upper and lower guides to them early this next week.

    I spent yesterday with a electrician friend of mine in the garage rewiring the Davis-Wells bandsaw and was eager to see if that motor would still work.
    I originally thought with all the parts in hand i was looking at a hr or 2 at the most in rewiring. Well, after 2-3 trips to the hardware store which is a pain in the rear by itself I finally had everything. I could have rigged it up in a make-shift way but decided that im going to do this the best way i possibly can.
    I used 8g wire on it from motor up and thru the extension cord. I could have used 10g and it would have been easier to work with but i got the wire from a electrical supply house where a friend works and it would have cost me the same so i went heavier.
    Top wiring was done like this :Box is a 4x4, 2" deep with a 220 switch and rised plate. the 2" deep was easier to work with the wiring.
    Bottom near the motor: 4x4 box, 2"deep for ease and i had to cut out a large hole in the middle of it to accomodate the wiring comming out of the motor. Then drilled 4 new holes to line up with the holes on the motor for mounting it.

    I had cleaned up the greese fittings on it and lubbed them all up also.

    There is no blade on it right now as i am cleaning the wheels up and need to get the guides fixed.

    Cost: I would say around $70.00 and 4hrs to do the project but, i really like how it turned out.

    Now the moment i have been waiting for.....plugged it in and threw the switch - it starts up slowly and runs like a champ. No noises no bad sounds and hums very quietly. I think we both stood back and just watched it for several minutes and were very happy that it still works like it did.......

    Ok any comments let me know or ill keep you up on how its going.......
    Next is to send off the guides for repair, order new tires, and clean it up for repainting.................Thanks Dan
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails jse_wiring_bandsaw.jpg   jse_wiring_bandsaw_1.jpg  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    The Heart of Dixie
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    4,268
    Your welcome and glad they could help. I have to place an order with the soon. I have never heard anything but good about them.

    Wiring looks great and yea 8ga is HEAVY and way overkill on that. But it won't hurt anything either.

    BTW, I meant to reply to something you said early. Some rubber tires are epoxied in place. Some are even vulcanized onto the wheels. Mine was so bad I finally took a belt sander on the wheel at a slight angle so it would spin as I sanded. Didn't think the old stuff would come off!
    God grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway,
    the good fortune to run into the ones I do,
    and the eyesight to tell the difference.


    Kudzu Craft Lightweight Skin on frame Kayaks.
    Custom built boats and Kits

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Palm Springs, Ca
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    Jeff yeah i hear ya on the belt removal. I spent hours on getting mine off thes wheels. They looked very old, rotted, cracked and hard as a rock. I chipped the rubber off as much as i could with a old wood chisel sharpened on my Jet wet grinder and it worked very well as long as i kept the blade sharp. After getting most of it off i used a razor blade and slowly scrapped the rest of the bumps and such best i could. When i was done with that i used a chemical wood stripper and soaked the face of the wheels and waited a bit for the stuff to work - again using a razor blade and scrapping the glue (or whatever they used - like concrete really) off.
    Finally, very fine emery to shine it up and make it look new. very nice when it was done and shiney.......but hours to do two wheels.......Dan

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
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    30,008
    Alright! Glad to see the motor fired up. That's a big step in the right direction. And kudos on the decision to "do it right" with the wiring. I've never regretted doing things that way, but I've had plenty of regrets the times I tried to cut corners.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Palm Springs, Ca
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    1,167
    Thanks Vaughn and ill keep you posted on how the rest goes.....always use the help/advice ya know.......

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