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Thread: Finish Compatibillty

  1. #1
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    Finish Compatibillty

    ok i am not the one to ask but there are many in our family with the knowlege to do this.. i am asking for a sticky or some such methode to have a chart made up from those in the know of what should and should not be done witht he finishes we are using today.. i know there are books out there from author 1 and many others tha thave there veiws but there has to be a few major guide lines that could be a instant refernce for those of us that arent as well vrsd in this finsih world.. kinda like the yellow pages you go there first to find the resturant your lookin for to get the hours.. is there something that we could come up with threw a community effort and then have it compiled in a sigle chart and made public to all of us.

    P.S some wize fella told me i wasnt the only one that has made finishing mistakes so lets see if we can change our world one step at time
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  2. #2
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    I'll start the Ball Rolling

    I found this list of descriptions of different finishes on the Web. Perhaps it can give us a place to start the discussion on compatibility.

    • Varnish (Brush-On and Spray) - Varnish is similar to the drying oils but have specialized resins that provide faster drying and a much harder finish. These are available in a wide array of sheens and degrees of hardness. Plus, some varieties are great for exterior use. Most applications are a multi-step process. Applying varnish produces a tough film on the surface of the wood.
    • Polyurethane (Brush-On and Spray) - Polyurethane is very popular now days, available everywhere and not to expensive. This clear topcoat is best suited for new wood applications. Basically polyurethane is a plastic coating, with interior and exterior uses. Some poly's can also be tinted for special effects. Applying polyurethane is the same as varnish, needing a few steps to do it right.
    • Acrylic Urethane (Brush-On and Spray) - Acrylic Urethane is rather new to the market. Best suited for interior use, but exterior varieties are now being produced. I like this type of finish. It doesnít smell bad and dries fast. The best part is it cleans up with soap and water. Usually takes a few coats to achieve a good film thickness. Applying acrylic urethane is easy, can be brushed or sprayed.
    • Lacquer (Spray Only and Brush-On) - Lacquer is a common interior wood finish that is available with varying degrees of hardness. Typically this is a spray only finish. Spraying lacquer will require some finesse. Brushing lacquers are rarely used today with so many other alternatives.
    • Catalyzed Clear Topcoats (Spray Only) - Catalyzed topcoats are a little different than anything else you will ever encounter. These are 2 part wood finishes that are difficult to use. Usually very hard and durable, this is a common finish used on cabinets. Rarely used by the do-it-yourselfer, but still a good choice for wood surfaces that needs extra protection and abrasion resistance.
    • Shellac (Brush-On) - Shellac is a natural resin dissolved in denatured alcohol and is applied with a brush. Shellac has good durability but is a little difficult to apply, it dries within seconds. Even though this is a natural resin it isnít recommended for food contact surfaces.



  3. #3
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    Getting there

    • Lacquer, and other "hot" finishes, will damage the other film forming finishes causing cracking and possible flaking.
    • Tung and linseed oil can be applied over themselves but not over anything else.
    • A good wood varnish can be applied over polyurethane, lacquer, water base finishes and any other film forming wood finish.
    • Polyurethane must be applied over itself only.



  4. #4
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    Thumbs up yup this is going dwn the right road

    thanks frank and any others that can conrribute to this and then after its got a fair amount of info in it that can be sorted and compiled by a willing memebr to apply on the finish forum top of list some how.. thansk again for your contibution
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  5. #5
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    A nice discussion here from Popular Woodworking:

    Finish Compatibility



  6. #6
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Townend View Post
    [*]Shellac (Brush-On) - Shellac is a natural resin dissolved in denatured alcohol and is applied with a brush. Shellac has good durability but is a little difficult to apply, it dries within seconds. Even though this is a natural resin it isn’t recommended for food contact surfaces.[/LIST]
    I've gotta take exception to that one. Shellac is very easy to apply if it's padded on - not brushed.

    More importantly, shellac is used extensively in the food and pharmaceutical industries as a coating for candies, fruits, and pillls. Ever wonder why those M&Ms 'melt in your mouth, not in your hand?' Yep! Shellac!
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  8. #8
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    Excellent follow-up Jim, thank you!



  9. #9
    Ever wonder why those M&Ms 'melt in your mouth, not in your hand?' Yep! Shellac!
    But who said M&Ms was good for you?

    Where do you know this from? About the M&Ms?


    I agree with both of you on the ease of application, If you don't get the right mix it a royal pain, but if conditions are right it is a smooth task.
    Last edited by Bill Simpson; 09-27-2008 at 04:07 PM.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Simpson View Post
    But who said M&Ms was good for you?

    Where do you know this from? About the M&Ms? ...
    Chocolate is good for you...isn't it?

    Learned about it during a factory tour many years ago.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

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