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Thread: Thought on floating wood shop floor

  1. #1
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    Thought on floating wood shop floor

    I'm considering putting down a wood floor in my shop. I'm doing it mostly for comfort. It kills my back and feet. I've tried different shoes and the rubber mats with no luck. I have seen a couple of shops with wood floors and really liked the overall affect they have on the shop.

    I wanted to run the process by you guys and get your input.

    Step 1: Lay down vapor barrier. The floor is going over concrete. There is no visqueen under the slab. So the recommended practice is to put it on top of the concrete and tape the joints to stop moisture from coming through the new floor. I am not completely comfortable doing this because I think it creates moisture putting visqueen over concrete. A gentleman from Germany recommended felt over concrete which I think I like better. But I may do nothing since I'm in CA and it's pretty dry here. What do you guys think?

    Step 2: Lay down 4x8 sheets of 1/2" thick sound board(fiber board). This is supposed to give the floor some cushion and resilience.

    Step 3: Lay down 1 1/8" tongue and groove OSB. This is put down the opposite direction of the sound board. It is glued in the tongue and groove and the ends are biscuited and glued. It is similair to a floating laminate floor. Nothing gets fastened to the concrete.

    Step 4: Sand entired floor with a floor sander. This takes out all the markings and evens the end joints.

    Step 5: Apply polyurethane or similar product. Someone recommended a product called "Traffic". It is supposed to be good for high traffic areas and has a hardener in it.

    I was told by my lumber suppier to go with 1 1/8" plywood sturdy floor. But the person I'm getting my info from did his whole shop (4,000 sq. ft.) with OSB and said it's holding up really good. He was told the same thing, to go with plywood. I think by using osb you get a little more cushion and comfort. Also there is no problem with putting heavy equipment right on top of the floor.

    Let me know what you guys think.

    Doug

  2. #2
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    i`m doing a residence right now.....wood over concrete.
    what i`ve done is rip trex decking in half and lead anchor it to the concrete 16"oc, in between the sleepers are pieces of 1"foam board.. then i screwed down 3/4" adventek using construction adhesive between the trex and adventek......currently i`m milling 2200sqft of white-oak into random width flooring that will be glued directly to the adventek, screwed and plugged before sanding.
    here`s some "firewood" ready to pass through the machines.......

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    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  3. #3
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    I'd think it would work, but would still do the moisture barrier of some sort. The materials would most likely still wick moisture out of the concrete and cause some mold.

    Was going to suggest looking for close-outs on laminate floor, might be able to find enough at a good price. Got to thinking that this would probably be a little too slick for a shop though, especially with dust on it.

    Anyway, just my .02...Good luck.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Darren Wright View Post
    I'd think it would work, but would still do the moisture barrier of some sort. The materials would most likely still wick moisture out of the concrete and cause some mold.

    Was going to suggest looking for close-outs on laminate floor, might be able to find enough at a good price. Got to thinking that this would probably be a little too slick for a shop though, especially with dust on it.

    Anyway, just my .02...Good luck.
    Darren I may take a small piece of visqueen and tape it on all four sides to the floor and see how much moisture appears. This is what I seen epoxy guys do. If I do a vappor barrier I'm leaning towards 15# felt.

    Doug

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by tod evans View Post
    i`m doing a residence right now.....wood over concrete.
    what i`ve done is rip trex decking in half and lead anchor it to the concrete 16"oc, in between the sleepers are pieces of 1"foam board.. then i screwed down 3/4" adventek using construction adhesive between the trex and adventek......currently i`m milling 2200sqft of white-oak into random width flooring that will be glued directly to the adventek, screwed and plugged before sanding.
    here`s some "firewood" ready to pass through the machines.......

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    Click image for larger version. 

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ID:	24555

    Sounds like a nice floor Tod. Did you put a vapor barrier down underneath the Trex? Just out of curiosity why are you using Trex as a sleeper?

    Doug

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by tod evans View Post
    what i`ve done is rip trex decking in half and lead anchor it to the concrete 16"oc, in between the sleepers are pieces of 1"foam board.. then i screwed down 3/4" adventek using construction adhesive between the trex and adventek......currently i`m milling 2200sqft of white-oak into random width flooring that will be glued directly to the adventek, screwed and plugged before sanding.
    Are you needing to shim the adventek sleepers (here and there) to ensure a flat floor or is the concrete floor flat enough that you don't need to worry about it?
    Last edited by Bill Satko; 10-11-2008 at 04:51 PM.

  7. #7
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    no vapor barrier, the floor is what was left of the original house, 1950`s vintage, 8" slab on top of a mountain....trex was used for two reasons,1) it`s 1-1/8" thick and works well with the foam board, 2) it`ll never rot or be affected by insects...
    as far as the floor being "flat" ....between the sleepers and the glued sheeting it`s really close, an 8` straight-edge shows less than 1/8" in the worse spots and that`s good enough for hardwood that`s sanded in place.

    as far as "moisture" goes the foam and adventek are both pretty impervious and i`d rather err on the side of some breathability than chance sandwiching moisture under the floor.....

    every installation is going to be different......for a shop in california i`d look into felt over the concrete, adventek not chip board! and flooring nailed directly to the sheeting.....for a shop, finishing like marty did with blo is a good idea, it`s easy to touch-up and not slick...

    again every install has it`s own quirks so slab conditions, drainage, interior humidity and temp difference between inside and under-slab should all be considered......
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by tod evans View Post
    no vapor barrier, the floor is what was left of the original house, 1950`s vintage, 8" slab on top of a mountain....trex was used for two reasons,1) it`s 1-1/8" thick and works well with the foam board, 2) it`ll never rot or be affected by insects...
    as far as the floor being "flat" ....between the sleepers and the glued sheeting it`s really close, an 8` straight-edge shows less than 1/8" in the worse spots and that`s good enough for hardwood that`s sanded in place.

    as far as "moisture" goes the foam and adventek are both pretty impervious and i`d rather err on the side of some breathability than chance sandwiching moisture under the floor.....

    every installation is going to be different......for a shop in california i`d look into felt over the concrete, adventek not chip board! and flooring nailed directly to the sheeting.....for a shop, finishing like marty did with blo is a good idea, it`s easy to touch-up and not slick...

    again every install has it`s own quirks so slab conditions, drainage, interior humidity and temp difference between inside and under-slab should all be considered......

    Tod I'm not putting anything over the 1 1/8" OSB...that is going to be the finished floor. I also considered advantech as well. But supposedly this system works good with the osb, maybe to give it some resilience and not make it too hard.


    Doug

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Doug Sinjem View Post
    Tod I'm not putting anything over the 1 1/8" OSB...that is going to be the finished floor. I also considered advantech as well. But supposedly this system works good with the osb, maybe to give it some resilience and not make it too hard.


    Doug
    think about clean-up........osb will flake up, heck even advantek will flake somewhat after enough abuse..how `bout baltic?
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by tod evans View Post
    think about clean-up........osb will flake up, heck even advantek will flake somewhat after enough abuse..how `bout baltic?

    I'm not sure it will if treated with a poly or something similiar. My friend in AZ has done a floor like this and has no problem. Then again he put 5 coats of polyurethane on it. Like I said he was pushed to go with 1 1/8 plywood but went with OSB instead.

    Actually osb is more stable than plywood as in less soft spots because it's engineered. So i'm assuming if I keep it sealed and dry it should hold up.

    Doug

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