Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 22

Thread: Going Into Hock to Eat Unhealthy?

  1. #1

    Going Into Hock to Eat Unhealthy?

    I have never paid much attention to food prices really. A minor squabble here and there and maybe a whine about the prices of food, but as I got into trying to figure out a market for my Lamb, I really started to look at food costs. Our food bill per week hoovers in the 80-100 buck range. Now keep in mind Alyson eats 90% organic food, while we eat healthy fruits and veggies, but 90% conventional (or non-organic food). Not bad really.

    So then I started snooping and seeing what the prices of other peoples grocery bills were. An interesting thing emerged from my crude food price scan. The people that ate a lot of junk food, pre-processed foods and pre-made "ready to eat frozen dinners and stuff", had grocery bills in the 150-180 dollar range. Now maybe that should not be surprising, but I noticed something else. Alyson NEVER sees her DR, at least not because of being sick. She just does not get sick. Its not hard to fathom that those people with high grocery bills more then likely have high health care costs as well.

    With all the problems I have had with my heart and my seizures I got a pretty good appreciation for the cost of modern health care. Adding to that is a grocery bill that is quite a bit higher then mine,and you really have to wonder...

    What is the TRUE cost of good food?

    I know in a recent study the USDA tested a modern city (Hartford CT) and mapped out one square mile. In that one square mile there was 14 places that served food, and only 1 that served fresh fruits and veggies. When they interviewed the store owner he said that even being the only one, he had a hard time competing with the fast food restaurants and stuff, and thus served fried food to his customers too. The elderly were the ones buying the fresh produce.

    So where am I going with all this? Well I am wondering what the true cost of good nutritious food really is? At the same time what is the availability of this good food, and will people buy it even if they can get it? More importantly, what do the people of Family Woodworking think of the foods they eat? Can many of you get access to organic food, naturally grown foods, or have plenty of local farm stand foods, or is it hard to find anything other then fast food? The reason I ask is, a recent study said Maine had the highest availability to organic food, and it is probably true. For every conventional food, in the rack next to it is a locally grown organic variety, and this is at the big supermarket. I might have it good, but does anyone else?
    Last edited by Travis Johnson; 10-13-2008 at 12:04 AM.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Michigan
    Posts
    2,436
    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Johnson View Post

    What is the TRUE cost of good food?
    That depends on the individuals interpretation of what good food is. For as long as I can remember I have heard people want cheap food.....just the other day one of my roofing crew asked me if it was cheaper to grow pork or just go the supermarket and buy it ready to eat.

    The answer is that it is cheaper to go to the supermarket and buy your food, but it will never equal the taste of your own grown food.

    I try to eat healthy, I grow a large garden, we put away food from the garden, I grow chickens to eat and some to lay eggs, I grow my own pork....wife wants me to raise a beef (nope...done enough of that, I'll buy from my friend instead) Point is I grow what I can, but I still go to the fast food joints cause they are convienient, not because I want to. I generally am working near town so it is closer than coming home.

    I'm not organic by any means....I think organic is misunderstood by a lot of folks who think natural is organic....but I try to grow my own food and I do it without growth hormones just good quality feed.....I like to think I am better off for it.
    A very wise man once said.......
    "I'll take my chances with Misseurs Smith and Wesson. "

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Rio Rancho, NM
    Posts
    1,417
    Quote Originally Posted by Chuck Thoits View Post
    INothing personal Travis but their is no way I mean no way I am ever eating lamb again.
    I have to agree with Chuck that if I NEVER see another lamb chop, it will be too soon. I've eaten lamb once in my life, over 40 years ago, and if all lamb tastes like those chops tasted, I'll pass. Every time I think about that meal, I can almost taste that lamb again. It was not good.
    Nancy Laird
    dandnspecialties@msn.com
    FWW Registered Voter and Voting Member
    Woodworker, turner, laser engraver; RETIRED!!


    A veteran is someone who, at one point in his life, wrote a blank check made payable to his country for an amount of 'up to and including my life.' If you love your country, thank a vet.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    13,360
    Wow, There must be something about lamb that turns some people off, I guess.

    Not sure if they've ever tasted properly prepared lamb, or if they actually had mutton. (I've never had mutton, so I don't know).

    I love a good should blade lamb chop marinated in olive oil, sliced onions, garlic, salt and pepper. Grilled it tastes great.

    But then again, I'm a hunter (Birds mostly) and actually like the gamey wild flavor of wild ducks and pheasants and quail and chukar.

    I like to garden and cook, and just put away our final batch of tomatoes and Jalapenos. I'm actually thinking of trying some of the jalapeno jelly I made as a glaze on some lamb chops this week....

    We don't eat much pre-processed food, but that's because I like to cook. To me, convenience foods aren't satisfying. My job is related to computers, so I don't get much tangible proof that I've accomplished anything at the end of the day. Cooking and wood working helps me to get that feeling of accomplishment that my day job doesn't provide.
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  5. #5
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    13,442
    We've got a couple of local farm markets. Some of the stuff is organic, most is not. For the most part, simply washing the veggies and fruit takes care of the non-organic stuff.

    Been thinking about doing a garden this next spring though. Dont think anyone in the neighborhood has one, so will probably stir the pot a little with the city folk. Might just do it as a raised bed rather than tearing up the sod though.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    583
    Travis,
    i generally don't do the food shopping in our house, but my wife and i do try to keep simple with food - buying ingredients instead of prepared foods. We live in the city, but do grow some of our own food and share quite a bit with various neighbors - no chemicals used. We also have the benefit of a huge farmers market (open all year) pretty close to the house. A lot of the produce, meats, and cheeses are not local, but you can get organic if you want, and shopping there is a good deal cheaper than at the grocery stores. We also have a smaller organic farmers market in our neighborhood during the warmer months. Organic meat really does taste different than the typical "off-the-shelf" stuff. It's pennies more per pound.
    We've been looking for a good source for organic milk. It's available here, but is really expensive (around $8 per gallon) at the grocery stores. We still buy it, but not all the time.
    Standard stuff we pick up at Aldi's (baking ingredients, cereals, etc.). Our food bill for the 4 of us is about the same as yours.
    We've also got a bunch of small sausage shops in the Italian neighborhood next to us. These really are old family owned small places. Wednesdays and thursdays are the typical "packing" days in those places. Great good stuff. I like my salsizza and capicola - just can't have it too often.
    paulh

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Inside the Beltway
    Posts
    2,666
    Travis,

    If you're really serious about this, you should read this article. It sure opened *my* eyes...

    http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/28/ma...in&oref=slogin

    Thanks,

    Bill

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Westphalia, Michigan
    Posts
    955
    We try yo eat healthy but end up just eating what's available. I just bought a side of beef from a friend and it's organically raised. I got it because it is the best tasting beef I've had and the cost was good. We also get some of our milk organic, from a local farm. My garden was a near disaster this year. Mostly from neglect.

    We plan on putting 10-15 deer in the freezer or canned this year. That's double the normal number but I got orders to "kill as many 'corn rats' as possible". I'm also thinking about trying to stock up on salmon soon.

    We used to raise chickens for eggs and meat but found it wasn't worth the money sunk into feed to be worth it. I could make a case for having another go of it if I can grow my own feed.

    In the end, food pretty much just disappears around the "hoard of locusts" that pass for my kids. Most food decisions are $ driven. You really don't want to know what we spend on food in a month.

  9. #9
    Interesting stuff guys, though I must say I was NOT trying to peddle Lamb. In fact I could raise 1300 lambs a year and get rid of every one. The market in the USA is pretty good. In fact 50% of Lamb has to be imported to keep up with demand.

    Nancy: You cannot judge the nasty old mutton of 40 years ago with the Lamb of today, but that is a different thread

    Its good to hear some natural and organic food is available to a lot of people out there. I do admit we don't have a garden at this house. We still get plenty of food from people that do,and its not uncommon in mid-august to lock your car when at the store because well-meaning neighbors will fill it full of garden veggies. We call it getting "zukinied".

    Organic has its place and we do buy it for Alyson, but at the same time as a farm we are not organic. This is in regards to the sheep, the corn and the hay ground. For starters is almost impossible to raise sheep organically because of the parasites they get because of the grazing they do so close to the ground. It takes chemical dewormers to rid them of that.

    I still think there is a difference in home raised livestock, even if its not grass fed only,which is a big rage here. As I type this the sheep are eating on corn, green chopped alfalfa and fresh grass. Of course all of it was raised within ¼ mile of where the sheep are spending their days. Its a ratio that my sheep nutritionist and I came up with, which means they are healthy. In my opinion, an animal that is healthy and non-stressed is the best tasting.

    If you are laughing about the sheep nutritionist, you should be. My sheep have their hay,corn and green chop tested at a lab and then analyzed by a sheep nutritionist for content. I use corn because it has lots of energy (sugar) which mixes well with protein from the alfalfa green chop and hay. Trace minerals get mixed in with their daily feed like selenium, molybdenum and sodium. It costs money but ultimately they are getting what they need. The real question is not why, but why many of us do not have a nutritionist analyzing what we eat.
    I have no intention of traveling from birth to the grave in a manicured and well preserved body; but rather I will skid in sideways, totally beat up, completely worn out, utterly exhausted and jump off my tractor and loudly yell, "Wow, this is what it took to feed a nation!"

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Rio Rancho, NM
    Posts
    1,417
    Quote Originally Posted by Travis Johnson View Post
    Nancy: You cannot judge the nasty old mutton of 40 years ago with the Lamb of today, but that is a different thread
    Here's the funny part, Travis. I can remember when I was a teenager and went with my grandparents to visit some distant relative, and they had a mutton roast on the table for Sunday dinner and I truly enjoyed it. I have to believe that the lamb chops that were fed to me 40-plus years ago were probably bad--maybe a little "dated." All I know is that they turned me away from lamb in a big way---for all these years. If I knew where to get some good lamb--roast, preferably--I'd probably try it again and who knows, I'd probably like it, since I eat just about anything that won't bite back!!
    Nancy Laird
    dandnspecialties@msn.com
    FWW Registered Voter and Voting Member
    Woodworker, turner, laser engraver; RETIRED!!


    A veteran is someone who, at one point in his life, wrote a blank check made payable to his country for an amount of 'up to and including my life.' If you love your country, thank a vet.

Similar Threads

  1. Hock Kitchen Knife Kits
    By Bill Satko in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 11-29-2013, 09:47 PM
  2. Roll up neaders shoulder plane kits @ Hock Tools
    By Rob Keeble in forum Neander Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-05-2010, 03:59 AM
  3. Build of a Krenov Style plane (Ron Hock Kit)
    By Brent Dowell in forum Neander Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 21
    Last Post: 05-05-2010, 12:53 PM
  4. Ron Hock's Sharpening Blog
    By Bill Satko in forum Neander Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-11-2009, 01:55 AM
  5. Hock or Lee Valley A2 Plane Blades?
    By Vaughn McMillan in forum Neander Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 04-07-2008, 04:35 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •