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Thread: Ideas for transporting tools to jobs for installs

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    La Habra Hts. CA
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    Ideas for transporting tools to jobs for installs

    I find when I get ready to install a kitchen it's a major ordeal to gather, organize, stow and transport all my tools to the jobsite. Right now I use a couple of portable toolboxes and a couple of buckets. Half the time I always seem to forget things. So I'm looking to get some of the small tools dedicated for job installs only. The big stuff just gets put in back if the truck...chop saw, portable table saw, 3 levels, saw horses etc. I'm looking for a way to make the experience easier. I'm leaning towards some type of stackable drawers that can be transported independently. Then when I get to the job unload them separately, stack them and lock them together and then strap them to some type of dolly. Any thoughts?

    Doug

  2. #2
    We use small step ladders instead of full size ladders. We rarely need to go over an 8 foot reach. We also use 4 inch PVC pipe to hold levels and short trim for convenience and protection. We also shop built carry trays with an assortment of screws and nails that we need as well as wood putty and wood glue. Other suggestions are cord reels for extension cords that are stowed easily and tangle free. It is important to roll up the cords with the female plug first so we only roll out as much cord as we need after plugging in the male end. Use cord reels for air hoses. While we have not yet implemented we have considered using PVC pipe bolted to the side of the delivery trailer to carry crown moulding. 3 way plug splitters are a must. Our tools are not stored in vehicles. They are stored in our storage building but we have dedicated install tools. In this storage area we have a clip board that holds a check list for what to bring on an installation. If we find that we need something next time, we add it to the list. One argument is that you can bring the whole shop to the job site but we have learned it is much better to "have it and not need it than it is to need it and not have it" so we bring the essentials. When I occasionally had to "split" installation crews, I purchased a very small and cheap compressor from Harbor Freight. I only expected it to be for occasional use but my guys grab it first because it is so light and easy to carry. The only problem I have with this is if it goes belly up on the job then we have to return with the "normal" compressor. Purchase a decent but small miter saw. The smallest you can comfortably work with. They are lighter and take up less space. We have an 8 inch Delta and a 10 inch Ryobi. The 12 inch Dewalts stay in the shop. Multipurpose tools are helpful like multibit screwdrivers etc. If you can swing it get the fuel cell type nail guns and you will cut down on your compressor, extension cord and air hose hassles.

    I hope this helps you.

    Todd

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    La Habra Hts. CA
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    399
    Quote Originally Posted by Todd Gilly View Post
    We use small step ladders instead of full size ladders. We rarely need to go over an 8 foot reach. We also use 4 inch PVC pipe to hold levels and short trim for convenience and protection. We also shop built carry trays with an assortment of screws and nails that we need as well as wood putty and wood glue. Other suggestions are cord reels for extension cords that are stowed easily and tangle free. It is important to roll up the cords with the female plug first so we only roll out as much cord as we need after plugging in the male end. Use cord reels for air hoses. While we have not yet implemented we have considered using PVC pipe bolted to the side of the delivery trailer to carry crown moulding. 3 way plug splitters are a must. Our tools are not stored in vehicles. They are stored in our storage building but we have dedicated install tools. In this storage area we have a clip board that holds a check list for what to bring on an installation. If we find that we need something next time, we add it to the list. One argument is that you can bring the whole shop to the job site but we have learned it is much better to "have it and not need it than it is to need it and not have it" so we bring the essentials. When I occasionally had to "split" installation crews, I purchased a very small and cheap compressor from Harbor Freight. I only expected it to be for occasional use but my guys grab it first because it is so light and easy to carry. The only problem I have with this is if it goes belly up on the job then we have to return with the "normal" compressor. Purchase a decent but small miter saw. The smallest you can comfortably work with. They are lighter and take up less space. We have an 8 inch Delta and a 10 inch Ryobi. The 12 inch Dewalts stay in the shop. Multipurpose tools are helpful like multibit screwdrivers etc. If you can swing it get the fuel cell type nail guns and you will cut down on your compressor, extension cord and air hose hassles.

    I hope this helps you.

    Todd
    Lots of good points Todd. Right now I do use a 12" dewalt for installs a smaller ligher one would be good. I do use a fuel cell nail gun but rarley use it for installs on cabinets. I do use the micro pinner a lot so I did puchase a very small and light senco compressor with about a 10 foot coil hose and that is convenient. I need to streamline all the drills I use and hauling all the chargers around. That is where I would like to design some kind of shop tray for like you said, screws, glue, drill bits, countersinks, chisels etc.

    Doug

  4. #4
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    new york city burbs
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    ooopss..sorry.
    Last edited by allen levine; 10-23-2008 at 05:59 PM.

  5. #5
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    Nov 2006
    Location
    Southern Louisiana
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    hey doug, i am alot like Todd, i bring everything. mainly because i always seem to run into some problem that needs a special tool to fix it.

    i personally use two of those big stanley roll around tool cases that they sell at lowes. i got tired of making 30 trips to the truck, this brought it to 2 trips, plus a few for the saw, compressor, etc.

    if you wanted you could take the time to make individual drawer boxes, kinda like a stackable tool box, basically it would be a deep box, laying on one side with drawer guides in it. the top and bottom could be indexed somehow so that they stack on each other, i'm thinking maybe a void underneath with indexing blocks on top, that way they can't slip off. you could decide which would be the bottom and attach some nice dolly type wheels to it. and even a long handle, just like a dolly. as i type this i wonder if it would be worth the time though, maybe just make the indexable drawer boxes and stack em and use a dolly to roll em around. i am gonna keep thinking about it.


    by the way, these kitchens you speak of....i haven't seen any pics...



    hey todd, welcome to the family!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    La Habra Hts. CA
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Mire View Post
    hey doug, i am alot like Todd, i bring everything. mainly because i always seem to run into some problem that needs a special tool to fix it.

    i personally use two of those big stanley roll around tool cases that they sell at lowes. i got tired of making 30 trips to the truck, this brought it to 2 trips, plus a few for the saw, compressor, etc.

    if you wanted you could take the time to make individual drawer boxes, kinda like a stackable tool box, basically it would be a deep box, laying on one side with drawer guides in it. the top and bottom could be indexed somehow so that they stack on each other, i'm thinking maybe a void underneath with indexing blocks on top, that way they can't slip off. you could decide which would be the bottom and attach some nice dolly type wheels to it. and even a long handle, just like a dolly. as i type this i wonder if it would be worth the time though, maybe just make the indexable drawer boxes and stack em and use a dolly to roll em around. i am gonna keep thinking about it.


    by the way, these kitchens you speak of....i haven't seen any pics...



    hey todd, welcome to the family!!
    Chris I'm bad about getting the pictures. I'll see what I can do about about posting some.

    Doug

  7. #7
    Join Date
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    Southern Louisiana
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    947
    doug, i'm just kiddin ya. i haven't posted many in awhile either. sometimes there just isn't enough time in the day.

    i will be postin some soon though, of the ones i put in my house. maybe first of next week

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Mountain Home, Arkansas
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    11,833
    I don't have to consider the matters you are asking about. But, the first thought that came to mind when I read these posts was security. I believe that I wouldn't want to have much left permanently on a truck that had value. 'Stuff' can vanish quickly if left unattended. Big city or rural, it's hard trust anyone these days.
    OTOH, I understand it is lost time and money loading and unloading repeatedly.
    Get a pit bull for traveling companion, maybe?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris Mire View Post
    doug, i'm just kiddin ya. i haven't posted many in awhile either. sometimes there just isn't enough time in the day.

    i will be postin some soon though, of the ones i put in my house. maybe first of next week
    That's my problem Chris I always forget the camera and always to busy. I'm doing a computer station in my house now so maybe I will post something.

    Doug

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Fusco View Post
    I don't have to consider the matters you are asking about. But, the first thought that came to mind when I read these posts was security. I believe that I wouldn't want to have much left permanently on a truck that had value. 'Stuff' can vanish quickly if left unattended. Big city or rural, it's hard trust anyone these days.
    OTOH, I understand it is lost time and money loading and unloading repeatedly.
    Get a pit bull for traveling companion, maybe?

    Frank I'm not considering leaving tools in a truck. Just a way to organize and transport to the job for installs.

    Doug

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