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Thread: Sanding Gizmo Advice

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Sanding Gizmo Advice

    Here's another request for a recommendation.

    Looking for recomendations for a way to sand my Bowls and such.

    I've seen the sanding pads on an angled handle for ~40$. Are those any good?

    Vaughn, I saw you had a pneumatic RO little guy? Would that be a better choice? (I do have an enormous compressor 80gal IR 2 stage).

    Or, is there something else?

    Thanks!
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  2. #2
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    I use these:



    Premium green hook & loop (H&L) wavy sanding discs are designed to sand without gouging on curved or contoured surfaces:


    Wavy edge hangs over holder approximately 1/4" and flexes against contours for more edge sanding control when repairing or touching up.
    2" and 3" for smaller areas or turnings; 5" for larger surfaces or turnings.
    Lubricant resists loading.
    USA.
    I have a small Bosch drill driver with a cone-shaped "thing" (I don't know what to call it) and put the disc on and turn on the Bosch--does a great job.
    Nancy Laird
    dandnspecialties@msn.com
    FWW Registered Voter and Voting Member
    Woodworker, turner, laser engraver; RETIRED!!


    A veteran is someone who, at one point in his life, wrote a blank check made payable to his country for an amount of 'up to and including my life.' If you love your country, thank a vet.

  3. #3
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    Brent, I have the "sander on a stick" (sanding pad on an angled handle), and it's handy for reaching into the insides of hollow forms (if the opening is big enough). I don't find it as effective as other sanding tools on other pieces, though.

    I also have a Harbor Freight "close quarters" drill with a 2" sanding pad that's handy for more aggressive material removal. Unfortunately, it's a Harbor Freight tool, so its a roll of the dice whether it'll last or not. Stu and I got the same drill as the same time (from the same store), and although mine has worked for over a year, Stu's self-destructed in less than a month. There are other, higher-quality angled drills available, though. Any of them have the potential for leaving swirl marks due to the orbital sanding action.

    My favorite, especially for finish sanding, is the little Grex ROS. Since it uses random orbits, the swirl marks are a lot less likely to happen.

    http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx?familyid=20343

    It's not quiet, but it sure works nicely. You do need a serious compressor to power it, though. I used mine for over a year with a little Auto Zone buzz-bomb compressor, and I spent more time waiting for the compressor to catch up than I did sanding. Now that I have a real compressor, that's not a problem. Sounds like you have ample air to power one.

    There's also this Metabo electric ROS that I know at least one production bowl turner uses and recommends:

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00004YBX5

    Due to its geometry, it can't reach inside a real deep (or small) bowl, but it's also probably quieter than the Grex pneumatic.

    For most of my sanding, I like the wave disks that Nancy mentioned, although I prefer the yellow ones over the green ones. I also use the wave backing pads, too.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  4. #4
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    Well, Tomorrow is my day to go to town, so I might just have to swing by wood craft....

    And Dang ole Harbor freight is on the way too.

    My wallet is feeling lighter already...
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  5. #5
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    Brent I got a 3/8" angle drill from Harbour Freight for I think $29. I have run that thing to death and it just keeps on going. I use the wavy disc's because they don't gouge the wood if you aren't carefully while sanding. Sand lightly and let the paper do the work.
    Bernie W.

    Retirement: Thats when you return from work one day
    and say, Hi, Honey, Im home forever.

    To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.

  6. #6
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    Sounds Good. Cheap angle drill at HF and wavy disks at Woodcraft. Shaping up to be a good day tomorrow.

    (And Rain on Saturday = Shop Time )
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  7. #7
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    Don't forget a sanding pad. And I'd recommend against getting one of the real soft ones. (I can't tell from the Woodcraft site, but it looks like the Sorby pad they sell is the soft open cell foam, and not the more firm closed cell foam.)

    I think the HF drill will be good for your needs. It sounds like HF is not too far from you, so if you do have problems, it's easy to return it until you get one that works.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  8. #8
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    I've actually had fairly good luck with most Harbor freight purchases.

    If it's a power tool or something, I treat them as kits that need work before you use it. I go over them and make sure to lubricate them or whatever. Been lucky so far, but then, what I do buy I treat as disposable, so....

    I'll keep an eye on the foam pad and try and make sure I get one that's not quite so soft. If not, I'll at least get the hook and loop pads. I've got bolts, and wood, and old mouse pads around that I could make a little 2" 'thingy' with.
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  9. #9
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    Brent the pads are not hard to make at all.........

    >> Dungeon Made Sanding Pad <<

    I was using the remains of a destroyed sanding pad, but you could certainly use a fender washer and a bolt.

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  10. #10
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    I'm getting great results with these and $10 corded drill. The price is good too.

    http://www.woodturnerscatalog.com/st..._holders?Args=
    Your Respiratory Therapist wears Combat boots

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