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Thread: Grizzly G0440 vs. G0441 Cyclones

  1. #1
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    Grizzly G0440 vs. G0441 Cyclones

    I hate to start another thread about DC but, its time to get on with it so I'll try to be specific. The curve, cost and size differences of the 440 vs. the 441 doesn't seem to match the $450 price difference. Knowing full well that this is one of the areas where bigger is better (and I fully support that view) I will ask:

    Anyone with a 2HP (or machine in this performance range) cyclone that has remorse over not going that extra bit to get a 3HP?

    The $450 is a decent chunk when comparing the machines only. The difference starts to become less distinct if you look at the total cost of an installation. I am specifically trying to avoid that "I should have" syndrome.

    My shop is about 21 x 31. 10" TS under and over, 8" jointer, 13" planer, 17" under and over & 10" under only BS, RT under and over, a pair of DP's, belt disc sander and what-not. I may re-deploy the current 1 HP unit to "jointer or jointer/planer status only" so the bulk of DC need would then be the TS, Large BS and RT.

    TIA for your time and input.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  2. #2
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    Can't answer you question. But what you need to look at is airflow/CFM requirements. Not Horsepower, even though they are related to each other. But more HP doesn't necessarily mean more air flow.
    God grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway,
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Horton View Post
    Can't answer you question. But what you need to look at is airflow/CFM requirements. Not Horsepower, even though they are related to each other. But more HP doesn't necessarily mean more air flow.
    I agree but, CFM and the methods that the numbers are arrived at seem to spawn endless side discussions ;-) So we'll take it like HP ratings on routers and shop vacs; just an indicator of basic size. Let's assume I've been down the road of all the curve studies, Bill's website, Clearvue and all that and am pretty well decided on one of these two beasts.

    There is a gain of 300 CFM on the 441 but 'at rated' and maximum static press goes down/up, impeller size increase, etc. etc. So, the question is; anybody feel like they went through everything that I've gone through, thought they had it all sewn up and then come to find out after install that they should have gone just a bit further? Otherwise, the 2HP seems like it should be fine.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  4. #4
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    glenn, in line with my "cast iron-n-horsepower" slogan for dust collection go with the largest impeller with a sturdy design that you can afford....all the cyclone does is separate the particles, it`s the "pump" that does the work..
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  5. #5
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    Hi Glenn

    I bought my dust collector even before building my shop. Everything I have done to date has centered around the enviromental aspect of my woodworking. I started in the basement and after a few atempts at cutting MDF with no dust collector and ignoring the dust as I had done in my earlier years,...... I got laid up with chest and breathing issues from the MDF dust. Then I discovered Bill Pentzs site and gained an appreciation for the impact of fine dust. I have to admit to being ignorant of the facts up until that point.

    Thats when I decided to resolve the dust issue properly to have a comfortable wooworking life in the future. Hobby shops are sealed up the dust collector circulates the captive air and that is what I never considered in the equation of breathing the fine dust. If the filter is no good then bang your lungs are going to take a hit given the exposure guys like us have to wood dust.

    My research led me to buy American and I bought an Oneida 3HP Gorilla. I decided on 3HP even though I could probably get by fine with a 2HP.

    Here is a guy in Nova Scotia that contributed to my decision.

    Take a look at his site he has a write up about his purchase

    http://www.picframer.ca/

    Some of the issues I considered.

    1) I wanted to get rid of fine dust with a really good filter.
    2) I wanted to be able to one day have my son work with me in the shop if he felt like it and put a machine on at the same time as me and not have to worry about dust collector power.
    3) I did not want to have the wish I had syndrome as I only intend to buy these items once for the rest of my woodworking time.
    4) If I had something catastrophic happen to me and my LOML had to dispose of my tools I wanted them to be sought after items as best as I could.
    5) I was determined to buy either Canadian or USA made product.
    6)I wanted a company that trully supports their product .
    7) I wanted to support a specialist company who has invested in developing solutions for this market specifically.

    I also considered the clear vue unit but prefered the idea of metal and a balanced impeller. You really have to see the Oneida unit up close to realize the quality.

    http://www.oneida-air.com/

    Of course this course of action cost me a great deal especially living in Canada where there is only junk available for sale. You would think not given our woodworking industry but the hobby market is small relative to US.

    I hope my post presents some food for thought.

    Lastly I go back to the philosophy of buying tools once in my hobby. I learnt the bitter taste of poor quality lingers long after the cheap price.
    Of course this supposes you can afford to do this in the first place.


    By the way to add to your post, Stu posted about the effects of a Kerosene heater and the reduction of oxygen and potential hazards. There is also this aspect to consider in the heating and that is the vapors from stains and varnishes. This is the reason I again spent a large amount of money on my shop heater. It is a sealed unit and draws air in from outside and vents the combusted fumes to the outside. At the end of the day you only have one life you have to ask what its worth.

    So HEALTH AND SAFETY is my number one consideration in woodworking.
    cheers

  6. #6
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    Glenn,

    Just spent a few minutes comparing the two. Now, remember, I just glanced at the specs, because I'll never be able to afford something like that.

    First, as you mention, the price difference is small when comparing the overall cost of the system. I imagine the piping, etc, will cost as much again as the cyclone. I'd hate to go to all that trouble only to be constantly thinking to myself "I wish I'd gotten the bigger one." That mental peace is worth $400 right there...

    Second, I notice a difference in intake size. Is there a price difference between 7" and 8" piping? Or is one easier to find than another?

    Third: noise! Will the 3 HP be way louder than the 2 hp? Are you planning on enclosing the thing? Or building an outbuilding to house the cyclone and maybe a compressor? If you are, the cost differential goes down even further...

    Not that I'm trying to spend your money, but since *I* don't have any to spend...

    Thanks,

    Bill

  7. #7
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    Rob, you reaffirm my feelings about long term health. I'd like to be doing this for awhile and the cost difference is about the amount of a local lumber run. I was sold on the Oneida but was one of those doofus guys that didn't click OK before the price hike. Now I've had to do some re-thinking. ;-( I believe the Oneida is a superior built machine it just got priced beyond what it is, for me. I don't drive a BMW either but they are very nice and very well made but, the jury is still out.
    Last edited by glenn bradley; 11-08-2008 at 10:21 PM.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

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