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Thread: First HF

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Reno NV
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    First HF

    So, After my shopping trip yesterday, just had to give all the toys a try.

    This is a small HF, About 3"x3". Started off as a chunk of a redwood 4x4 post.

    Used the multi tip to hollow it out and do a little shear scraping on the inside and outside.

    Used the new angle drill and sanding disk to sand it off.

    Pretty fun stuff!

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    Alexandria, Virginia
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    Dag, nab, it Brent! What is it with you? You find a piece of wood lying on the ground, buy a new tool, learn it in 15 seconds, and turn a perfect hollow form.

    Very, very nice!
    Last edited by Frank Townend; 11-09-2008 at 03:46 PM. Reason: Thought I better spell Brent's name correctly.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
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    15,807
    Yep, that is a hollow form alright

    Nice looking wood too, and they are fun, for sure!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  4. #4
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    Kea'au Hawaii. Just down the road from Hilo town!
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    Nice job Brent, I can't wait to get a few other things done in the shop so I can start playing with my lathe. I did chop up some 8"-10" lengths of 5" ohia last week at work and brought them home to practice on. Free is nice here
    Aloha,

    What goes around, comes around.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    ABQ NM
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    I know I replied to this earlier, but I must have closed the tab before hitting Submit.

    You did great, especially for a first time. And redwood may be soft, but it's not necessarily easy to turn cleanly. The curve looks very smooth and consistent, and it looks like the new sanding toys paid off by erasing any tool (and sanding) marks.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Reno NV
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    Amazingly enough, the shear scraper tip on the multi tool worked pretty good. Made it easy to ever so gently tweak the surface.

    I had some serious issues with tear out when I was trying to part off the bottom, and some tear out on the hole. So basically the bottom is narrower than I was shooting for, and the hole is a bit wider.

    I did a test using my old method of sanding, and it left some serious lattitudinal scratches. The sanding disk and drill did a great job of cleaning them up.

    Redwood is kind of funny. Even though it is very dry and pretty soft, once its turned the different rings of wood seem to move in different ways. Hard to explain, but the lighter areas seem to 'collapse' a bit. Gives it an interesting texture.

    The sander worked pretty well too remove any scratches.

    The only downside is I handed it to my wife and she said 'What is it?'. I told her it was a hollow form and she said, 'What am I supposed to do with it? Put it on a shelf and dust it?'

    Thanks Guys!
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  7. #7
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    Jul 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by Brent Dowell View Post
    The only downside is I handed it to my wife and she said 'What is it?'. I told her it was a hollow form and she said, 'What am I supposed to do with it? Put it on a shelf and dust it?'
    Can't live with them and can't shoot them....



  8. #8
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    She's actually a pretty darn good shot herself....

    I'm sure I've had her mentally drawing a bead on my head a time or two...
    Last edited by Brent Dowell; 11-09-2008 at 04:46 PM.
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  9. #9
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    Aug 2008
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    Hey Brent, I noticed you went for the midi hollowing tool. Was not getting the bigger one a cost issue or was there another factor? Are you using it with a regular tool rest? I'm hoping to get in to HF next week so have to line up what to get. Many thanks!
    Your Respiratory Therapist wears Combat boots

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
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    Cost wasn't really an issue. I think the larger one is only a little bit more.

    I've only got a Jet Mini lathe, so I figured I'll most likely be doing smaller projects. So, I figured I'd get the midi sized one, to make it a little easier to do the small things (smaller entry hole).

    The tool is actually pretty cool and versatile. I'm using it with a regular tool rest. The tool has a flat side and a curved side. When hollowing, you use it with the flat side down. When using as a shear scraper, you can use the rounded side down so you can get it as a nice 'shearing' angle.

    Here's a link to a video on it. http://www.woodcraft.com/family.aspx...de=videos#tabs

    It's pretty much exactly what I wanted. A little tool that can do some basic hollowing.
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


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