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Thread: Dining Table build-40x60 inch

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Odessa, Tx
    Posts
    1,813
    Hey Allen, Don't feel like the "Lone Stranger", 'cause we ALL have days like this sometimes. (I just chalk it up to the "Moon" not being Right or something, and quit for the day). About a month ago, I had TWO of those days in a row, then things smoothed out again. It's frustrating, but ya can't let it get ya down.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    SW Idaho
    Posts
    6,702
    Been there - done that - not fun.
    Tomorrow will be better.
    “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk
    Soon to have a web presence! www.reynoldswoodcraft.com (under construction - a long way from done)

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Plainwell, Michigan
    Posts
    4,190
    Oh ya, there has been more than a few times I have came up from my shop scratching my head wondering what I had accomplished , pile of wood on the floor unusable. It happens, blow the dust off, better days to come, i still know when your done with the table, it will be a fine one

    Tom

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Bellingham
    Posts
    2,207
    Allen, like everyone else has said, we have all been there. Now I just walk away from the project for a while. It seems to help. Curious as to what your problem is on the table saw. I am fortunate that I have hand planes, which allow me to fine tune any edge problems during glue ups. I would have used my jointer plane to re-joint the edges. I could not imagine doing without my hand tools. They don't replace the machines (like table saws), they compliment them.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    new york city burbs
    Posts
    8,936
    I believe if the opportunity comes up, I will make a valid attempt to attend classes with hands on training how to use certain hand tools, planing is sure something Id love to understand and work with.

    I find the difference between making an adirondack chair and trying to glue up a table top straight and gap free is almost like night and day for me.

    I havent gone back out to the garage at all today, figured let it sit for a day or two.
    Im fighting cold weather now. As soon as the temps drop below freezing, its going to be difficult for me to get much work time with any real commitment.(I hate to leave things undone and sit all winter)

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Long Hill Township, NJ
    Posts
    467
    Hang in there Allen, WW is supposed to an enjoyable hobby!

    My moment was during a simple picture frame. I had plenty of stock prepped before the first miter cut. I had made frames before without issue. By the time I got the miters working I had wasted too much of my stock. The stock is still sitting on a table in the garage. I should just offer a sacrifice to the wood gods and burn it in the fire pit.

    Keep posting your progress on the project.

    Cheers

    Jim

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
    Posts
    9,708
    Hey Allen, I feel for you. Its times like this when I thank my teachers at school in shop class. But like everyone has said we all have days like this. It is also a lot easier when one has all the space, clamps and shop comforts.

    If it makes you feel any better I had a similar time doing drywall. Nearly got myself killed. Two sons and no help so in typical stubborn John Wayne style figured I will do it all on my "Pat Malone". That was until 10 sheets of 5/8 drywall came crashing down on me and the only thing that save my life was a folding leg table which I had rescued off the side of the road from someone elses garbage. I have never registered the exact weight of 54"x 12ft x5/8 drywall...all I know is if the table had not been there for me to fall under I would be pushing up daisys. Table leg too the hit and broke but it stopped the drywall from crushing me. Just had the table leg welded by a friend of mine this weekend.

    Moral of the story we all have days like this. As Larry says get hold of some of the taunton books. I have seen them at our local library so you need not have to buy them. Best of luck when you get back out there.
    Rob .....Alias John Wayne now Pasquinell da trapper.

    "forget the apples slap some bacon on a biscuit and lets go...

    We're burning daylight"

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    new york city burbs
    Posts
    8,936
    Things started off better today, then sunk as fast as the titanic.
    I couldnt change out the blade in the TS.
    I noticed the first time the wrenches supplied arent the greatest, but I must have over tightened the nut(I never had this problem), and I could not loosen it. I had the inside nut strip a drop, so I finally just jammed a piece of wood under the blade and tugged till I got it loose.
    Right before I switched to the wood under the blade, the wrench slipped off and I took out a chunk of my right pinky as my arm flung back and my hand got caught on the teeth.(freud doesnt kid around with blades)

    My wife came home for lunch, told me I need a stitch, cause after over an hour it wouldnt stop bleeding. (yeah, I did take a picture, of the blood coming through the bandage, but decided it doesnt need to be shared)

    My buddy who shuts down my sprinkler system came over,(he is a contractor first, does alot of side jobs), he looked over the TS and the nut and arbor, said it looks ok, just not to over tighten it.

    I put a butterfly on the booboo, Im not sitting in an emergency room for 8 hours on Long Island waiting for a stitch.

    I was very close today to junking this project, and shutting down my work area till Springtime. Very, close, I still couldnt get a new board straight.
    Managed to get one straight, and realized if I want to build tabletops of even poor quality, I will eventually need a jointer to stop killing myself and getting frustrated.
    Im going back to do another glueup. If ya hear any wrenchs smashing through windows, well, at least I didnt give up.

    Who said this is easy?(I told my wife dont be so fast to give away our table yet, Im far from being in Schaeffer City)

    I didnt do much better with the planer today, still suffered a bit of snipe and wood getting stuck halfway, but I got smooth surfaces eventually.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Bellingham
    Posts
    2,207
    Allen,

    Any chance you could borrow the use of a jointer? Maybe a cabinet shop near by that would allow the use of theirs? I forgot that you did not have one. You amaze and inspire me with your determination to move forward with your projects. I am going to hit the projects hard when I get home tonight. Thanks for inspiration.

    On those stuck arbor nuts, I use a soft impact hammer and gently tap the end of the wrench to break the nut free. It does not take much action with the hammer. Make sure you wedge the blade with a stick. I could not help but wince when I read the part of your hand slipping onto the blade!
    Last edited by Bill Satko; 11-17-2008 at 06:28 PM.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Inside the Beltway
    Posts
    2,666
    Allen,

    We've all been there. I'm *still* there most days. To the untrained eye, it all looks so simple, I mean, what is there to cutting a few boards straight and gluing them up?

    I went through some of the exact same problems. My table saw kept tripping the breaker... didn't solve that one until a ran a subpanel to the shop. That took many days that might have been better spent working wood, but at least I don't have *that* problem any more... and now all the shop power is GFCI'd. Then, even when I'd aligned the sawblade and the fence to the miter slot, things kept coming out bowed or crooked. No, I didn't have a jointer, so I made a jointer sled.

    Not perfect, but closer. Got even closer when I made some magnetic featherboards for the opposite rip cut. For me, those aren't safety devices, they're accuracy devices.

    Don't tell anybody, but I ended up putting a little wax on my saw arbor. It's probably a really bad idea, but since I did that I stopped cutting myself every time I changed a blade. I actually put it inside the nut, and then screwed the nut back on. On the other hand, my biscuit cutter has sat on the shelf for the last couple years. Never could get the durned thing to align properly, and one time I slipped with it and almost had one of those horrific accidents we hear about. Haven't picked it up since!

    I often have the impression other people don't have these problems. But if you take them down to the local pub, and prod them a little, by the third beer they'll likely confess to even worse...

    Thanks,

    Bill
    Last edited by Bill Lantry; 11-17-2008 at 06:58 PM.

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