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Thread: Dining Table build-40x60 inch

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    new york city burbs
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    I already asked my buddy that was here this morning, if he knows anyone around, a contractor, or a cabinet maker that would let me rent some time or me pay them to joint a few pieces of wood now and then.
    Im sorry about the complaining.
    Its looking at the amazing work here, that drives me foward.

    I had a talk with the wood today() and told it flat out if it doesnt start cooperating with me right now, its going to be heating someones home shortly.
    I recut, yes, I must have recut 1/8th off this wood 27 times, but I got a glueable edge finally, with a touch of very light sanding to get out 4 or 5 burn marks.
    Only time will tell.
    I only have to glue up the two pieces now.I glued the 2 pieces today to one of the other glueups.
    I did not cut the final two 3.5 inch, I just left them at 6 and 5 inches approx since I needed to make a final width of or near 40 inches(whether Im an inch or 1.5 inch narrower, will not make any difference, the client is easy)

    with everything in the middle of the garage, and everything out, its very time consuming to have to shift from one operation to another. I dont have table space to just put everything on, so its a constant shift of everything, and I try to plan 4-5 steps in front so I only have to move stuff around minimal times.
    This cuts my actual work time a couple of hours each day I devote to woodworking. That and cleanup, which I have to do a little every day to keep the garage in breathable condition.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails wood stuff 323 (Medium).jpg  
    Last edited by allen levine; 11-17-2008 at 07:12 PM.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
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    16,508

    By George(Allen)

    i think you got there !!! see i told you that you could ride again allen the next thing you should look for is a space heater to keep you comfy in your shop.. do you have propane or natural gas? i got a small electric space heater that looks like a old style raditor that i thinkis filled with oil any way they heat pretty nice and dont have open flame to cause trouble.. might be a good way to take the chill off... that sure looks like a table top to me now there allen
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  3. #33
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    new york city burbs
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    I have two of those radiator/oil filled heaters.
    They take way too long to heat a cold area like the garage, and the pull is like running a table saw all day long, the cost and everytime I plug in and run a tool, I get blacked out.
    Giving up 10-12 weeks a year is ok, I have so much other stuff to keep me busy.

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    new york city burbs
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    I got started very early today, had tons of errands, no work, so its most of the daylight hours devoted to messing up all that mahogany.
    Glued up the final 2 pieces, the tabletop is all glued, and although I wont call it anything but a second hand glueup, its holding, and looks good.
    I got some good news this morning, the guys will be digging the trench for my new wiring in around 2 weeks, The damage is 100 bucks, but it will be my pleasure, since its 32 feet of tough tree roots and I know its miserable work.(Ill even be able to plug in a new dust collector by next springtime)

    Cut the mortises on the legs, and decided I wanted to off center them ever so slightly, maybe 1/16th to one side so I can cut the tenons a bit longer.
    Visually, it wont make much difference.
    But being the dufus I am, I cut them all to match on the short end, and I cant even figure out how I made such a huge error. so the tenons will have to be around a inch long instead of one and an eigth.
    Cut the aprons, spreading the legs approx 6 inches from each end of table, both length and width wise, I dont know any better, I do it by looking at what looks good.

    Ill put up a few pics, I left the camera downstairs, I should have the tenons cut and fitted mostly, even with the slight errors I made, but I have to do some cruddy work like throwing out all the mums and flowers that are dead.
    Gotta clean out all the pots and planters, and get that nonsense out of the way while Im cutting Dado plates and tenons.
    Just keeping the flow of the table updated.

  5. #35
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    Mar 2008
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    table top is all glued and ready for next step.[ATTACH] hereClick image for larger version. 

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    I like the new fence, its solid and every tenon came out perfectly straight.Click image for larger version. 

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    Some dry fittingClick image for larger version. 

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    the problem I mentioned, cutting mortises on inside , the tenons were too long, so I cut them downClick image for larger version. 

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    all fixed up, ready for glueClick image for larger version. 

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    PUt it back for another dayClick image for larger version. 

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    but I got most of what I wanted done today(and the flowers and plants are gone, and I scraped off all that moss, need to go buy that clorox stuff)

    I also cut an extra support apron piece for center, where I have the level laying. Im not sure if I need additional support in center of table, I was going to MT joint it to lengthwise aprons. (the top is one inch thick, and its heavy)

    Hey, Im sorry if I bore any of the pros, but Im having some fun now. (at least until I have to start sanding and finishing.
    Didnt they eat on raw wood tables 500 years ago?)

    I am a bit sorry about the quality of the pics, its a decent 5 megapix camera, but I cant hold a camera steady, and if I put a tripod in the garage, well, I just dont have the patience, Ill try to rest camera to improve the shots for more detail.
    Its a very attractive wood. Id like to share more of it in the raw, unfinished, unsanded, it just looks great.
    Last edited by allen levine; 11-18-2008 at 08:00 PM.

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Odessa, Tx
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    1,813
    Glad you had a "Good Day" in the shop today, Allen. It's looking good.

    When you said before that you had to cut the tenons off, I'm sorry it didn't register with me at the time, so I'll give you a tip for "Future Reference". If the mortises intersect with each other, you just bevel the ends of the tenons at a 45* angle so they fit against, or just clear each other inside the mortises. A lot of folks used to make them this way intentionally, (and some still do), just not as much now as in the past I think.

    Another tip I have is that in your picture where you show the fence setup for using the dado making the tenons, you have the mdf that is attached to the fence going full length past the blade, Buuuuut....... if you will only clamp a short block to the fence to reference the length of the tenon against, (that stops "Before" the wood would get to the sawblade), it will eliminate any "tendency" for the tenon to "Drag" on the fence and possibly skew the workpiece as it passes through the cut and cause you to not have a perfectly square "Shoulder" on the workpiece which could leave a gap between the workpiece and the leg on one side or edge of the tenon when it is fitted into the mortise. (Hope I described this so it is understandable).

    Keep up the good work.
    Last edited by Norman Hitt; 11-18-2008 at 09:10 PM.

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Plainwell, Michigan
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    4,192
    Table's looking good Allen keep the pics comming. Looking forward to the final product, I'm betting it will be spectacular

    Tom

  8. #38
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    Mar 2008
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    new york city burbs
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    thanx tom, norman, 2 hours too late, and cutting the tenons that way, well, not a tuff thing to do, Ill keep it in mind for the next one.
    Ill be cutting tons of tenons with all this wood I bought, and Im going to change that mdf tomorrow. Thats probably why I had the few tenons snag up and that rounded off type of shoulder mistake on the ipe chairs.
    Hey, what I dont know could fill a book, so I greatly appreciate these little tips, anything to improve my work.
    Thankyou sir.

  9. #39
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    Mar 2008
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    I have to cut a straight edge on each end of the table, and cut it down to size............do I have to build a giant sled?
    (Is there a reason I cant use a metal straight edge and a circular saw?)

  10. #40
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    Nov 2006
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    Odessa, Tx
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    Quote Originally Posted by allen levine View Post
    I have to cut a straight edge on each end of the table, and cut it down to size............do I have to build a giant sled?
    (Is there a reason I cant use a metal straight edge and a circular saw?)
    Not a reason in the world, Allen. Just be sure when using the Circular saw that you place the Top (face) side down so any splintering would be on the bottom side, (unless you are going to use a router to put a decorative edge around the top side edges, then you would put the bottom side down and the routing would get rid of any splintering on the top edge of the cut).

    (I almost always use a Circular Saw and a straight edge to cut off the ends of table tops) I do lay out and mark the cut line, (and sometimes scribe that line to prevent tearout) before making the cut with the CS.

    PS: Use a GOOD SHARP crosscut blade in your CS.

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