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Thread: Door threshold question

  1. #1
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    Sep 2008
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    Boston, MA
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    Door threshold question

    What's the best way to install an oak (shy of 3/4" thick) interior door threshold? I just refinished the oak floors in a small room in our house and removed the old threshold because it was in bad shape. I tossed the nails that came out with it so don't have a reference point and couldn't find this info readily online. At least I did one smart thing--I didn't toss the old threshold and used it as a template--still was a bit challenging. I have some 6d 2 1/2 inch finish nails and was thinking of using them (hammer and countersink, fill, finish). My 15 g finish nailer isn't available right now. Do people pre-drill holes to avoid splitting or is that not an issue? Does anyone use trim screws? Construction adhesive in addition to (or instead of) nails?

    I realize it's less common now to use thresholds for interior doors--this one was originally installed because the hallway was carpeted. It's not anymore, but I'd have to too much repair work under where the threshold goes to not have one.
    --Rob

  2. #2
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    I just put one in about an hour ago. Transitions from the oak parquet floor of the entry to the tile of the now dead "Pink Room". I was tight enough between the door facings that it isn't moving. I had brought an old tube of clear silicone in to put about 6 dabs across the mounting surface, but didn't need it. Kind of glad because now I don't have to try to clean silicone off the concrete before I tile the entry way.
    If I was going to use anything that created a hole in the threshold, I think I'd get some decorative brass screws and countersink them, but I'd prefer not to nail it if I could. Never have been a big fan of filling the holes knowing it won't match. If you have it as a tight fit, try that for a while. I doubt it will move, at least not much. If it does move, use a few dabs of silicone to hold it down. Jim.
    Coolmeadow Setters...
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  3. #3
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    Nov 2006
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    Delton, Michigan
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    use some contruction adhesive and pressure for abit and wont go anywhere.
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
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    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  4. #4
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    Mar 2007
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    Long Hill Township, NJ
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    Rob:

    I just countersink 3 screws and screw the threshold down. I've used the standard McFeely's square drive screws in the brown/bronze color and they look fine. I'm no fine carpenter but it looks fine to me . . .

    The prior suggestions of a little caulk and some pressure would give you the fastener fee look.

    I might try that on the transition I need to make for the middle bathroom - we removed the carpet and had the hardwood floors refinished. The marble threshold is a little high relative to the oak floor, so an oak transition might look better.

    Jim
    Last edited by Jim Mattheiss; 12-01-2008 at 12:00 AM. Reason: added another comment

  5. #5
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    Thanks for the suggestions. I'm not too worried about nail holes since the floors themselves have a pretty good number (filled). I'm also curious about how 'reversible' construction adhesive is. For example, if I want to one day remove the threshold as I did for the old one, prying wasn't too difficult with it just nailed, but with adhesive will I have a much harder time removing it?

  6. #6
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    Delton, Michigan
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    possibly yes,,but you want it to stay dont you? and i was going the route to avoid nails.. if you want to change it out frequently and have nails already in the floor, go with nails.. my suggestion though would be the finish screws and plugs or filler. holds fast and you can just see wood when your done,clearner looking in my opinion
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  7. #7
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    Sep 2008
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    Another concern I had with construction adhesive: we have wide swings in humidity seasonally and you can see that reflected in an increase in gaps in the floor in the drier winter. Would adhesive be like gluing and be more apt to cause splits whereas nails might permit some wood expansion? Just wondering.

  8. #8
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    Delton, Michigan
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    your location isnt on your profile or the thread so as for your humidty swings. i am in area where the weather changes alittle too and it has worked for me.
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  9. #9
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    Nov 2007
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    Southwest Michigan
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    I would Pre-drill your Reducer strip, but also if there is a tounge or a grove avalible in you flooring I would use that to your benifit. by using that it will help prevent rubbing from the .750" back edge of the reducer against the flooring, you can glue it to the flooring with the tounge and groove.
    If it can be Moulded I'll Mould It.
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  10. #10
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    Sep 2008
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    Boston, MA
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    Larry-I'm in the Boston area (I fixed my profile). Not huge swings but not small. Winter gets really dry since we heat with forced hot air and our house humidifier is weak. But it sounds like I wouldn't have to worry about it.

    Jim-sorry but I'm not sure I understand your suggestions. The threshold isn't for changing heights of two floors, they are at the same height but have some gaps right under the threshold. And the floors are tongue and groove but that's not visible to me so I'm not sure how I would use that.

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