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Thread: bulls eye sanding sealer

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Southern Louisiana

    bulls eye sanding sealer

    i was using this stuff to put some seal coats on a few items for the house. well it was quite cool and windy this weekend and hence it seems it was taking longer to cure. the can recommends 1 hours before resanding and second coat. so i waited 2, when i went to sand with a fine sanding block, it kept getting "stuck" on the finish. the finish was dry to the touch but felt different than usual. also the finish would leave permanent finger prints if i pressed my finger into it. i left the second coat to dry for 4 hours. still the same thing? now when i say cool i am talkin bout lousiana weather here. it probably was in the high 50's yesterday, humidity was probably pretty high though, didn't check the reading but i could tell.

    so anyone else have problems like this? it says it is 100% dewaxed shellac

    decided to leave it over night and all day today and try to resand tonight.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Delton, Michigan
    my expeirnce with shellac chriss is that usually is dry before i get outof the finish room... the temp doesnt seem bad but the humidity would cause troubles... but evne then shellac seems t handle about everything better than your tellun us.. is the sealer old? they do say it has shelf life but jim delaney says he hasnt had any trouble with it in his use of it. that was shellac from flakes i has some that was year old and worked fine... what are using for the top coat? i would suggest to use that as the sealer and just use more coats chriss.
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Constantine, MI
    My thoughts were the same as Larry's - humidity and age. Otherwise shellac is a pretty dependable and easy to use finish.
    “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    new york city burbs
    I can tell you from my small experiences, using a coating of poly takes 4 times as long to dry good and dry outside then it does inside.
    If the humidity is up, the stuff can take 3-4 days to dry properly.
    Dont know about shellac, but Id guess its similar.
    fingerprints, it aint dry, and aint ready to be sanded.

  5. #5
    Humidity and age was already stated, so I'll repeat: Humidity and age, if you were older you would have known it was too damp for old Shellac...

    Here is my solution: I have a flexible gooseneck lamp, outfitted with a 100 watt light bulb and an aluminum reflector. I place this looming over the project, not too close but close enough to feel the warmth (but not to Bake or cook the piece) just enough to maintain a warm dry habitat. I find this is very useful when finishing projects in the winter where (although in the confinds of my heated basement shop) outside weather conditions are reflected in ambiant conditions.
    Last edited by Bill Simpson; 12-01-2008 at 03:13 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
    SealCoat® has an expiration date on the bottom of the can. What does yours say?
    Jim D.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    No, not all of SoCal is Los Angeles!
    I assume we're talking Zinsser's 'Seal Coat' here. Check the date on the bottom of the can. The local BORG had some on the shelf that was 6 months over the date. I pointed this out and they just shrugged.

    I hit my Seal Coat 1:1 with DNA when using it as a sealer. It is dry to sand or continue in 30 minutes or so. Normally I don't sand between coats of shellac as it is a 100% burn-in finish.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Southern Louisiana
    thanks everyone

    i checked both cans, they had a manufacturer date on the lid, one was aug and one was sept of 08. it was dry this evening so i sanded it again and put on another coat.

    i was suprised to see how glossy this stuff gets after a few coats. i only wanted to put 2 coats, but i had some runs to sands out so now i think i will end up with 4.

    thanks again


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