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Thread: I need help - the rest of the story....

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    I need help - the rest of the story....

    I purchased a Harris tools travisher from a woodworker in Ohio via another forum. He seems like an honest fellow. He told me that he bought it in a group of tools - sold all or none. Anyway, it was unused, came packed safer than Fort Knox, and looked great.


    so then I started to look more closely at it.


    the iron is unhoned, and looks new.
    but as I carefully extended the iron, a crack appears.


    Now, like I said, the seller is an honest guy. He offered to do whatever I like to make it right. He is even willing to pay for a new iron - which will cost just a few buck less than I paid for it. I think I'd rather just send it back to him. Do any of you think this can be fixed? If yes, how? I've thought of epoxy or solder, possibly even welding. Looking at the iron though, it looks to me like the design is really poor, with almost no steel around the threaded rod, and therefore, a manufacturing defect. I wrote to Harris tools, but they have not responded yet.

    Before anyone says it, I know that with a travisher or spokeshave, one must advance the iron a little at a time on each side, so as not to stress the threaded posts. I was very careful, and did not damage the tool.

    So what would you do?
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails travisher small.jpg   IMG_1533small.jpg   IMG_1535small.jpg   IMG_1536small.jpg   IMG_1538small.jpg  

    Last edited by ken werner; 01-03-2009 at 12:55 PM. Reason: follow-up

  2. #2
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    Jan 2007
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    Ack - that looks like it broke right in its weakest spot ... that can't be good. I wonder if the wood moved enough to cause that (since it's an unused tool, afterall). I'd probably give it back if I were you.
    Jason Beam
    Sacramento, CA

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    Delton, Michigan
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    give it back and start over! it might be fixable but then your looking at another one thats new for just touch more correct? new one ,,who is to say how long the other side is going to hold up
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  4. #4
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    The problem with doing any welding on the iron is that it's likely to destroy the temper of the metal (make it soft). So it'd have to be welded, then re-tempered. Probably not worth it.

    It *might* be possible to wrap the majority of the iron in a wet rag and braze the end. And braze is almost as strong as a weld.

    If you're going to return it to him, tell him I'll buy it cheap and take the risk of fixing it. That way, he can get a few dollars out of it - and maybe I'll get a travisher (of course, maybe I'll get a mess).

    Mike
    Ancora imparo
    Go into the world and do well. But more importantly, go into the world and do good.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    I think you should return it.

    If it were me, with shipping charges and all that jazz, I'd fix it, I know I could MIG weld it without destroying the temper, there is this jelly that you can buy, it is really thick, and you can load it onto the steel, even on the underside, I'd buy a pot of this jelly and then I'd weld it up, I'd also most likely change the design a bit and add a bit of steel in the area that it broke, and adjust the wooden handle part.

    Best of luck!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  6. #6
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    Wish I knew how to braze and weld. Just not in my current skill set...

  7. #7
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    is there someone you know that brazes near you? if so that would be an option.. like stu said it could be welded as well with the right setup,, i would braze it less heat,,and adjust the wood like stu suggested,, but thats becasue i can braze and have the stuff to do it
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  8. #8
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    I don't know any brazers around here. Maybe I can check out some welders. But this job will require a light touch and some fair skill, it seems to me.

    Larry - do you really think it could be brazed to be strong and also not damaged in the process? Might you be interested in doing me a favor?

    Thanks,
    Ken

  9. #9
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    eek!

    is this a antique or a tool that can be gotten most anywhere? theyre arent any folks near you??? i would try ken but i am fair jaunt from you over in New york and the shipping would be something that you are looking at as well... i am not saying i wouldnt do you a favor, i am always willing to help out.. but his doesnt look like a logical one here
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  10. #10
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by larry merlau View Post
    is this a antique or a tool that can be gotten most anywhere? theyre arent any folks near you???
    Well it isn't an antique - it's new [unused but pre-owned] but it's not something that's readily available, hard to find one in good shape that's been used.

    I'll see if I can find someone around here who can do good quality brazing.

    Thanks anyway Larry.

    Ken

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