Page 1 of 7 12345 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 65

Thread: Jointer inquiry

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    new york city burbs
    Posts
    10,188

    Jointer inquiry

    Im getting a grip on a jointer now, understanding the way it straightens a board, how the blades work, etc....

    Im not going to bother going for a tabletop model simply because I have no more table space and Im going to have it mobile on its own base, so I might as well buy one that has its own, and purchase the dolly/mobile base.
    Im going to rip out some floor to ceiling cabinets, around 6 feet worth, and push the jointer against the wall when not in use, so I have full use of the space.(to park the car)

    Ive been reading alot, and seems like most woodworkers, not the pros, have 6-8 inch jointers in their shop.
    How do you face joint a board that is more than 8 inches with that?
    80% of the rough lumber I bought was 10 inches wide.
    Is it worth the money for me to go out and buy a 12 inch jointer, quite a big jump I think.
    I cant imagine my needs would be greater than anyone here, and that was one thing Im confused about.
    Am I missing something?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Constantine, MI
    Posts
    7,891
    Allen,

    If you have the bucks, something like this, or this would fill your needs and have minimum impact on your square footage.
    Host of the 2017 Family Woodworking Gathering - Sunken Wood

    “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk
    www.wrworkshop.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    London, Ontario
    Posts
    3,383
    Quote Originally Posted by allen levine View Post
    How do you face joint a board that is more than 8 inches with that?
    80% of the rough lumber I bought was 10 inches wide.
    Is it worth the money for me to go out and buy a 12 inch jointer, quite a big jump I think.
    I cant imagine my needs would be greater than anyone here, and that was one thing Im confused about.
    Am I missing something?
    You don't.
    You're not missing anything.

    For stock wider than your jointer you can either rip your boards down to fit your jointer, or you can learn to use a #7/8 hand plane, or you can use a sled to "joint" the board with your planer, or you can be picky about your wood and just run it through the planer.

    Or you can save and save and buy a wide jointer (or combination jointer/planer)

    ...art
    There's usually more than one way to do it...
    www.wordsnwood.com ........ facebook.com/wordsnwood

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    The Heart of Dixie
    Posts
    4,268
    There is a method that allows you do that. I just don't remember the details of how you do it. But it is possible.

    The guys on woodnet have posted it several times. I just never pay attention.
    God grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway,
    the good fortune to run into the ones I do,
    and the eyesight to tell the difference.


    Kudzu Craft Lightweight Skin on frame Kayaks.
    Custom built boats and Kits

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    No, not all of SoCal is Los Angeles!
    Posts
    9,076
    Quote Originally Posted by allen levine View Post
    Im not going to bother going for a tabletop model simply because I have no more table space and Im going to have it mobile on its own base, so I might as well buy one that has its own, and purchase the dolly/mobile base.
    You are a wise man who will benefit from the pain of other$, including me ;-)

    Quote Originally Posted by allen levine View Post
    Im going to rip out some floor to ceiling cabinets, around 6 feet worth, and push the jointer against the wall when not in use, so I have full use of the space.(to park the car)
    Your plan is solid. My G0490X stands parallel to my lumber storage wall and moves easily out of the way when I need lumber and goes right back when I am done (felt pen marks on the floor).

    Quote Originally Posted by allen levine View Post
    Ive been reading alot, and seems like most woodworkers, not the pros, have 6-8 inch jointers in their shop.
    How do you face joint a board that is more than 8 inches with that?
    80% of the rough lumber I bought was 10 inches wide.
    Although I buy lumber wider than 8" I rarely require a part that is wider than 8". You want your parts rough cut to approximate size to reduce the effects of cup, bow, etc. by lessening their span. I just finished face and edge jointing a large number of parts in QSWO; they all fit. On those rare times I need to joint wide, I use this.

    Quote Originally Posted by allen levine View Post
    Is it worth the money for me to go out and buy a 12 inch jointer, quite a big jump I think. I cant imagine my needs would be greater than anyone here, and that was one thing Im confused about.
    Am I missing something?
    Alas, only you can answer this one. I worked this over quite a bit as well and went 8". If I had the money I would have gone 12" but mobility becomes a larger (no pun intended) issue. My near 400 lb machine moves easily on my current shop floor. My previous floor would have been a challenge. A 600 lb to 900 lb machine increases this challenge.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Billings Missouri near Springfield Mo
    Posts
    4,552
    The lumber you get now days should be ripped down in width to no more than 5" and that is pushing it in most cases. The reason is due to cupping of the boards or panels you are gluing up. The pro shops wont go over 3 1/2" for boards in glue ups to help stabilize the panels. If you get a 12" jointer then you will come up with a lot of 16" board it just seems to work that way. I would save the money and buy a better 8" jointer and if you need something wider than that have it flattened at a pro shop on the big stuff.

    Jay

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
    Posts
    17,472
    allen ,, do you have access to a pro shop or lumber yard that will flatten for you? if so then take alook at how much wood your gonna be going threw that needs to be flattened.. sometimes the use of a tool isnt sufficient to warrant the cost of it.. in my expeiernce i started witha old 6" good tool and i made do with it for some time,, but as i got more into it i realized that a 6" isnt nearly as useful as a 8".. but if you ask tod you dont need a jointer at all.. the new saw blades that are availble will make your glue lines fine...been there done that, its not hip allen they do a good smooth cut.. you can get a good used jointer, but you being alittle new at this you might want get a trust worthy person to look at the used ones for you..maybe that carpenter neighbor you have.. as jeff mentioned you can flatten aboard wider than 8" on a 8" jpinter but its not nearly as good as doing it on a larger jointer.. those that say , the majority of your work is gonna be smaller stuff and to precut are right on the money..on the blotchy cherry box i made i had the door stiles cut out of some wide stock and before i ever planed them, i flattened them waited for a week, and they moved some more. then i finished flattening them.. once you take and break the surface of any board it can move again...so be on the lookout for it.. so to shorten this up, my vote would be a 8" but look at the cost of tooling vrs use...
    Last edited by larry merlau; 12-04-2008 at 11:38 PM.
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    new york city burbs
    Posts
    10,188
    Now IM really confused.(btw, I bought the Freud Glue line rip blade for the table)

    I figured I can go with something in the 6-8 hundred range, I know Ill get use out of it.
    Even store bought s4s lumber isnt that straight sometimes. I thought a jointer is a quick solution to this, even if Im building simple stuff like outdoor chairs with screws.
    Used equipment is not something Im comfortable with if its over 100 bucks.
    I wouldnt know if the machine had 10 hours use or 1000 hours use by looking at the motor and such.(just being upfront about what I know)

    Before I was typing that the local tool guy near me sells Jet and Im pretty sure Powermatic jointers.
    I've seen Jet on display in his store, along with alot of brands I never heard of. Alot of equipment
    Im going to measure the actual width of the machine to see if I can fit it where Id like to.
    Id like to get it into the garage before March, so I can play with it a bit, figure it out, and start getting ready for my cabinet build.
    Its a bit overwhelming having to make a decision on so many different quality brands, models, sizes.
    I dont really know enough about blades, motors, and so on to make a hands on educated decision.
    I have to trust what I read and what Im told, as in explanations. I never want to rely on a salesman word, since I never know if theres any other motive behind his push other than my immediate needs.
    Ill compare the prices, but would prefer the 8 inch. What woodworker wouldnt want the extra 2 inches?
    Last edited by allen levine; 12-04-2008 at 11:54 PM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Waterford, MI
    Posts
    773
    I'm kicking the tires on the idea of going with a 12" jointer/planer,not so much because I think I need 12" jointer capability all that often but because I'm currently in another never ending battle to condense my tool storage space. Getting rid of my 6" jointer and 12" benchtop planer for one machine has some real appeal. Conventional wisdom says to get a jointer as wide as your bandsaw's resaw capability but a 16" J/P to match my MM16's resaw height just aint in the cards (or budget). No matter what you get, there's always something that wont fit though and Art's handplane option is the only real option (I'd add a scrub plane to his list though). I dealt with a 22" wide pine board that wouldn't fit much of anything I've seen locally machine-wise. Couldn't convince the board owner to rip-it-and-flip-it, so I flattened it the hard way as a favor.
    --------------------------------------------
    Link to my ongoing ClearVue DC Install on CV's site: http://www.gallery2.clearvuecyclones...s-Mini-CV1400/

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    new york city burbs
    Posts
    10,188
    If I can fit the jointer under the rear cabinets, Ill have plenty of room when I rip out some of the wall cabinets on the other side to fit a band saw.
    I have around 22-30 inches from wall of use, so I think Ill squeeze it in there on a base.(Just have to rip out that work shelf which I don't use anyway)Click image for larger version. 

Name:	wood stuff 390 (Medium).jpg 
Views:	38 
Size:	69.5 KB 
ID:	26312

    Im not a tool junkie, nor know much about any tools.

    This is my only plane.(nope, its not a nail file)Click image for larger version. 

Name:	wood stuff 391 (Medium).jpg 
Views:	35 
Size:	31.6 KB 
ID:	26313I have 2 of them, and I dont have a clue why I even have one.

Similar Threads

  1. New jointer....maybe?
    By Rennie Heuer in forum New Tools
    Replies: 27
    Last Post: 11-01-2009, 03:29 AM
  2. New/old jointer
    By Frank Fusco in forum Old Iron
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 06-06-2008, 01:34 PM
  3. No Big Jointer?
    By glenn bradley in forum Jigs and Fixtures
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 03-30-2008, 08:41 PM
  4. Tell me about your jointer
    By Ed Nelson in forum New Tools
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: 05-18-2007, 08:09 PM
  5. Jointer RPM
    By Travis Johnson in forum Old Iron
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-24-2007, 02:58 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •