Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 14

Thread: Centerless Pen Turning

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Melbourne, FL
    Posts
    472

    Centerless Pen Turning

    Here are a few pics of Centerless Pen Turning. I am totally sold on this method and have the bushings for most of the common pens that I make and definately all my high end pens.

    I think Frank F. will also say he likes this method.


    The old pen mandrel looks more like a crankshaft with the amount of flex you can easily get in the middle.

    This method is right on the money. I have not measured runout with this method but I bet it is close to zero.

    The bushings fit so perfect that you get a definate pop when you remove them from the tubes. Glue run into your tubes - you better not with these bushings as the fit is perfect.

    I do not sell the bushings. I get them from John Gooden. The standard set up is a hard steel set plus a Delrin set turned just a little undersize used for sandind and finishing. Delrin so that CA and/or your finish does not stick to them.

    What makes the wood turn with no solid connection? Friction of the 60 degree centers pushing up against the bushings.

    Try it sometime - you will like it.

    BTW - The wood shown is Morton Bay Fig from T. Edisons house in Ft Myers, FL.


    1 st - picture is the wood on a standard mandrel. No need for this to turn this pen Just shown for comparision.

    2 nd - Using centerless bushing

    3 rd - out of bushings to show the set up

    4 th - engraved Edison box

    5 th - Set of bushings
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails edison1.jpg   edison2.jpg   edison3.jpg   edison4.jpg   edison6.jpg  

    Last edited by Pete Simmons; 12-14-2008 at 05:48 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    North West Indiana
    Posts
    6,097
    I have read and thought a lot about this type of turning. Glad you found you like it. Am eventually going to buy myself a small bench metal lathe so I can make my own bushings for whatever it is I want to turn. Thanks for showing and love the pen box. Your engraving is beautiful as always.
    Jon

    God and family, the rest is icing on the cake. I'm so far behind, I think I'm in first place!

    Host of the 2015 FAMILY WOODWORKING GATHERING

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    13,357
    Looks interesting. Is there some reason you can't just use the regular bushings that would ordinarily go on a mandrel?

    I've got a collet chuck and figure it'd be pretty easy to fit one of my 60 centers in that do do the 'driving'.

    For my nicer pens, I've been 'choking' up on the mandrel with the collet chuck and doing only one side of the pen at a time. I find that greatly reduced the runout. I'd then put them both on the mandrel for finishing.

    This method seems to eliminate the run out entirely.
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Melbourne, FL
    Posts
    472

    Bushings

    Maybe could use regular bushings but these have a 60 degree cut into the end for a great fit.

    These are also much better bushings. Right on the money size wise and made from a harder steel so they last.

    With your regular bushings is there sometimes a little slop in the bushing to pen tube fit? Not with these they fit the pen tubes perfect!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    13,357
    I hear you on the bushings. I've got some for a pen kit that are just flat out the wrong size for the pen kit they are for. They are 'close', but a few thou can really make a differenct.
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
    Posts
    11,825
    Yeppers, very interesting.
    I'll study yer post and get back later.
    Have to go out and join the real world now for a while.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Melbourne, FL
    Posts
    472

    Edison Pen

    Finished Edison Pen - Morton Bay Fig Tree wood.



    And a little more info ( Frank if you may know more on this please help)

    J Gooden may not be making the bushings any more. Paul Huffman (of Huffman pen vise fame ) may now be making these bushings.

    If I find out any more info I will post.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails edison9.jpg  

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,008
    That looks like a method I should try. I've about quit turning pens because I was getting frustrated in my attempts to get the pieces turned without runout. (I need to also try the 'one piece at a time' approach that Brent mentioned.)

    Beautiful pen and box, too, Pete.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
    Posts
    11,825
    First: Knock-out fine pen. Results speak loudly.
    The term "centerless" threw me. I have heard it before but never knew exactly what it meant. I have had 'centerless ground' items and just accepted that is was good thing.
    The special bushings you are referring to are new to me. I do like the idea of very precise bushings made from hard steel. Where can we get?
    But, I have made all my pens to date with the standard bushings that come from the popular sources. e.g. CS, PSI, etc.
    Now, for clarification, the method, and term "no mandrel turning" was not invented by me. Someone else first posted the method on one of the penturning forums a number of years ago. Then the idea sorta went silent. One day I tried it, liked it and posted my results and thoughts. Then the method, for whatever reason, got very popular. I have been incorrectly credited with originating the method. I can't take credit for it.
    Except for 7mm pens (Slimlines, Europeans, etc.) I now do all my pens with the 'no mandrel' method. Eliminating the mandrel also eliminates sloppy fit of bushing to the rod and flexing in the rod. This eliminates out-of-round finished pens.
    As Pete showed, quality goes up.
    When I turn, I use the bushing for guidance as to size. And, me not being a visual person, needs the bushing to help see what the final product will look like. I turn the ends to a couple thou oversize and hit the corner with a slight bevel, very slight. I then remove the bushings, replace the turned blank onto the centers and sand down. After doing just a few this way one can sand down quite accurately without measuring. And, that tiny bevel helps 'cheat' in acquiring a perfect mate with the kit fittings. It takes more time than using the mandrel but makes a much better pen. I have less blank failures with the no mandrel method. Not sure why. Mebbe not having rod flex eliminates some vibration that results in catches that cause blanks to blow up. Just mebbe. Dunno. But, that might make up for time lost otherwise.
    Ennyhow, I'm hijacking the thread here. Will just say, if you make, or are trying to make, nice pens, like Jr. Gents, Statesmen, etc. do try the no mandrel method, you will like it.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Goodland, Kansas
    Posts
    4,834
    Pete that is a beautiful pen. As I told you I also quit turning pens because it didn't seem to make any difference which mandrel I used I never could get them to come out symetrical. One side was always wider than the rest. I didn't want to mess with a bunch of this and that to correct it so I just don't turn pens much. I would definitely be interested if you find any info on who makes them.
    Bernie W.

    Retirement: Thats when you return from work one day
    and say, Hi, Honey, Im home forever.

    To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.

Similar Threads

  1. Turning, turning turning .......woodside .........
    By Dave Hawksford in forum Turning Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 04-09-2014, 04:17 AM
  2. Really Big Turning
    By Ted Calver in forum Lathe Project Showcase
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 09-26-2013, 02:22 AM
  3. Another Day off and More Turning
    By Dan Mosley in forum Turning Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 07-11-2009, 10:48 PM
  4. 1st turning
    By Lee Clock in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 10-14-2008, 07:29 AM
  5. Off-Bed Turning
    By Sandy Navas in forum Turning Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 04-02-2007, 03:15 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •