Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23

Thread: reinforced miter joints

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Central (upstate) NY
    Posts
    1,457

    reinforced miter joints

    I'm adding some purpleheart to slots cut into a miter joint. I ripped the slots on my RAS (I'll post pics of the setup on Boxing Day - it is quite entertaining) and am getting ready to cut the purpleheart inserts. I am looking for input as to the best grain orientation of the purpleheart. The exposed section will be the diagonal to the grain, but I do not know if it is better for the flat part hidden inside the joint to be with grain (this is what I would do left to my own devices for a little extra strength even though the purpleheart is primarily decorative) or if that hidden span should be cross grain.

    The project is a jewelry box about 6" by 8" by 3" tall (maybe closer to 5" with top and bottom attached).

    I hope my wording is understandable. Happy holidays to everyone!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Central (upstate) NY
    Posts
    1,457
    Took some pictures.

    Here is the setup I used on my RAS to cut the spline slots. (Why couldn't I think of the word "spline" last night for my first post?? ) I wanted to use a climb cut for quality and I would have needed the work piece considerably more forward to have the blade fully behind the workpiece to do an anti-climb cut. As it was, I needed to put a spacer piece between the workpiece and the RAS fence in order for the rear of the cut to be fully cut through (for the spline to be flat across and not have an unfinished cut "blade curve" at the rear.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	RAS_setup.JPG 
Views:	139 
Size:	34.1 KB 
ID:	27068

    Doesn't that 12" Delta FTG rip blade look scary without the guard? The blade is made by Leitz and was stolen from their excess tool department for $10 plus $5 for the professional bushing iirc (the blade, like almost all 12" stock blades had 1" bore but my saw, a Delta 33-890 has 5/8" arbor). I had to make this cut without the guard, so I thought out ahead of time how I could possibly lose an arm with this operation before proceeding. I spent Far longer waiting for the blade to stop spinning between cuts than the actual cutting or even measuring / setup.

    My original post is to determine which orientation of the purpleheart is best. Please feel free to let me know if there are special words to describe these two possibilities.

    This is what I mean by cross grain hidden:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	purpleheart_crossgrain.JPG 
Views:	62 
Size:	14.4 KB 
ID:	27066

    And this is what I mean by with grain hidden:

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	purpleheart_withgrain.JPG 
Views:	53 
Size:	15.2 KB 
ID:	27067

    Thanks!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Muskegon,Mi.
    Posts
    111
    Mark That J-Box looks it's comming right along ,and the miter cuts look good.
    I like the way the spline cut looks very well done. The rip blade looks scary without the guard? Be carefull!!
    SOMEDAY is not a day of the week

  4. #4
    Either way you put it, the grain is going to be at 45 degrees to the grain of the sides, some end grain and some length grain. The direction to choose would be which ever provides the most contrast (if that is what you are looking for) The strength of the spline would be to place it with the long grain spanning across the joint.
    Last edited by Bill Simpson; 12-25-2008 at 05:49 PM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
    Posts
    17,475
    mark your nuts!!!!! using that RSaw without guard isnt safe at all.... you could have done that cut witha table saw much safer... as for the oreintation i think either will look god but like Mr simpson the strength is better to have long grain to long grain...
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
    Posts
    5,323
    Yow! That setup looks scary!

    The slots look great, though. As for the grain, you want it running across the slot - with the grain running parallel to the back edge of the slot. That way, you'll have end grain showing on both edges, and will add the most strength to the joint.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Central (upstate) NY
    Posts
    1,457
    I may make a guard to use if I put the saw in horizontal blade mode in the future. I couldn't use the factory guard this time as it would've been in the way of the cut - something wiggles in my memory about a molder guard accessory available for this saw - might look into that too. What I did do was to turn the key to lockout the power switch (testing it each time by trying to turn on the switch) each time I rotated the work piece. Then I still made sure that my arm wasn't in contact or too near the blade (with the carriage travel knob locked to prevent motion along the carriage) while making the workpiece adjustments.

    Larry, I don't have a tablesaw - feel free to bring me one and build me a bigger shop so I have room for one!

    I thought about doing this on the router table - even bought a slot cutter bit - but didn't think the slot cutter bit was deep enough for what I wanted to do, especially since I would lose depth from what I needed to do to properly align the workpiece for a 45 degree cut. With the tools I have on hand, it seemed like the RAS was the best choice. At any rate, the job got done with no injury, so I'm calling it a success!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Inside the Beltway
    Posts
    2,666
    Mark,

    You're a braver man than I am. I would look at that set up and say to myself "no amount of joint strength is worth the risk of that spinning blade!"

    The box looks good, but be careful!

    Thanks,

    Bill

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
    Posts
    13,464
    Sometimes setting up jigs and such are more fun than building the box itself, even when they are scary looking. At least it looks to be pretty well controlled and limited. Looks like that joint will add a lot of strength to to piece.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
    Posts
    11,833
    I don't have enough knowledge to speak to the strength question.
    From your description, I sounds like you took diligent measures to stay away from that exposed blade. Nonetheless, I wouldn't have done it that way. Yes, it looks scary. Meaning dangerous.
    That box is small enough you could have cut those miters with an ordinary handsaw in, probably, less time than it took to set up that flesh eater.

Similar Threads

  1. Chair joints
    By Dietrich Trenner in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 09-14-2011, 09:54 PM
  2. Finger joints
    By Bill McQueen in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 02-21-2010, 02:31 AM
  3. Box joints hard ones
    By Bill McQueen in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 02-02-2010, 05:45 AM
  4. Half-lap joints
    By Dietrich Trenner in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-20-2008, 03:27 PM
  5. Box Joints Anyone?
    By Dave Richards in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 04-15-2007, 09:56 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •