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Thread: Finishing Arborite Edges/Corners.....???

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Finishing Arborite Edges/Corners.....???

    I'm putting the Arborite on the wing tables of the SCMS Saw Station and I'm wondering how you guys do it.

    For example.........

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    On the faces, I use a laminate flush trim bit, but on any corner that is not at a 90, you cannot use the flush trim bit.

    What I do is I try to cut and glue the piece as close as possible, then I use a file to bring it down flush. Is there a better way?

    Just asking what you guys do, I learned most of this stuff a long time ago, and maybe there is a better way to do it now

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    810
    Hi Stu,

    1. Flush trim cutter (straight with a bearing)
    2. Bevel cutter (with bearing - any angle you're happy with) and set router height so the cutter doesn't go into the substrate - should leave a very skimpy edge hanging over
    3. File by hand or sand by hand to be smooth, slightly rounded if you wish, but just finish flush to the substrate - don't cut into the substrate or it will show


    That's how I was taught to do it in the cabinet shop. Others may have different approaches.

    cheers

    John

  3. #3
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    Oct 2006
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    ozarks
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    either file or sand......(and cuss)
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Pa
    Posts
    186
    Got a Rotozip or a Dremel

    A tracing bit or guide point bit may work?
    If not you could try a thin strip of aluminum sheet taped
    to the top and run the tip of a wood cutting bit on top
    of the aluminum strip.

    How about and odd shaped router bit with a bearing,
    like maybe a ogee bit ?
    Donít have the best tools, don't use the best woods and projects donít always turnout perfeck.
    I just feel the need to work with wood!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    16
    In our cabinet shop, where we do tons of laminate work, we do it one of two ways............

    first you can cut it close and use a block sander to bring it down to flush (similar to waht you are doing with the file)

    2. you can take the base off of your trim router and free hand it and a bearing bit. You will still have to sand it flush but it gets it close.

    Not sure what kind of router you are using but Porter Cable makes a tilt base for their trim router that will work.

    http://www.deltaportercable.com/Prod...roductID=16383

    http://www.deltaportercable.com/Prod...roductID=11108
    Michael

    "It's hard to soar with eagles when you fly with buzzards"
    GO STARS

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
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    Pa
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    Heres one by Bosch that offers several bases.
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000EJX202
    Donít have the best tools, don't use the best woods and projects donít always turnout perfeck.
    I just feel the need to work with wood!

  7. #7
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    Tokyo Japan
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    Tilt base, I have never seen one of them, I guess if you had a lot to do, that would be the way, I've only got a couple to do, so I'll stick the the file

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Odessa, Tx
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    1,813
    I've always just used a file or sandpaper on a wood block, But, I guess if you have a Pattern Bit that is long enough, (would depend on the angle), you could cut a block of wood to match the angle and double stick tape it to the router base, and trim away. ('course with only two to do, you'll probably have them finished before you could make the angle block anyhow).

  9. #9
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    The block is a good cheap way to make the angle for the router, thanks for the idea Norman

    This is the rest of my "Method" such as it is.....


    The piece is glued on, I use stinky contact cement....


    ...I trim the sides I can with the router, flush trim bit, then I put masking tape on the area that I want to protect, just in case. I also wrap a few turns of masking tape around the tip of the file, to make it slide easily over the masking tape on the face of the piece, this also creates a very slight angle to the edge.


    Once I get it filed down close, the edge of the tape starts to come off, this tells you that you are really close to being flush.


    All done, not maybe the fastest way, or the best, but it works for me .
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

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