Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Sidney 8" jointer?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Floydada, Tx
    Posts
    1,941

    Sidney 8" jointer?

    I am looking at a 8" sidney jointer that is in exellent shape and runs great. I looked on owwm.com and did not find much on it. The owner says it is has a 6'+ bed, 3h.p. 3ph motor, round head, made in 1828. Asking price is $650 obo. I will upload pics later. Just wondering what says the old iron feans, yes or no?

  2. #2
    Don't know anything about it Al....did you ask in the room, someone might know something about it. I would be leary though it may have one of the square heads.
    Reg

  3. #3
    I asked maybe I can have an answer for you in the AM
    Reg

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Odessa, Tx
    Posts
    1,813
    Quote Originally Posted by Al killian View Post
    I am looking at a 8" sidney jointer that is in exellent shape and runs great. I looked on owwm.com and did not find much on it. The owner says it is has a 6'+ bed, 3h.p. 3ph motor, round head, made in 1828. Asking price is $650 obo. I will upload pics later. Just wondering what says the old iron feans, yes or no?
    Was it REALLY BUILT in 1828???????? I guess I'm not as well up on my knowledge of the Industrial Revolution that I thought I was, 'cause I sure didn't know they made anything like that 110 yrs before I was born. Gee, a machine with a round head and 3 phase motor that is 180 years old......., now that would Really be something to have.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    The Heart of Dixie
    Posts
    4,268
    The name Sidney rings a bell but I can't place it. I have my doubts about his date thought. Thats old even for old arn.

    As for square head I have one in my jointer and use it. Just with the greatest of respect! And no one by me uses it either.
    God grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway,
    the good fortune to run into the ones I do,
    and the eyesight to tell the difference.


    Kudzu Craft Lightweight Skin on frame Kayaks.
    Custom built boats and Kits

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    The Heart of Dixie
    Posts
    4,268


    Take a look-see here. I think I found one just like it.

    Sidney jointer 1828
    God grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway,
    the good fortune to run into the ones I do,
    and the eyesight to tell the difference.


    Kudzu Craft Lightweight Skin on frame Kayaks.
    Custom built boats and Kits

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
    Posts
    583
    Sounds like it's been upgraded over the years. The round cutter head is good - do you know if it's a clamshell or the more typical slot w/ jib and lock screw configuration? The latter is generally considered safer, but with some regular attention the clamshell should serve you just fine. Both are considered "safety heads". Actually, the worst jointer accident i know about was caused by one of the newer round slotted heads. Anything can happen.

    I would look carefully at the bearings. The originals would likely be babbit bearings. If they're still on the machine, make sure they have no slop in them. It's better if there is still some shim separating the upper casting from the lower. This indicates that there's still some wear life left in them. With babbits, often come drip or wick oilers. I'd see that they're still there.

    If the cutter has been upgraded, there's a good chance that the babbit bearings may have been replaced with ball bearings and pillow blocks. Not OEM, but certainly won't effect the function of the machine. Also, ball bearings are typically a lot easier to replace than babbits.

    Often, on these older machines, the cutter guard is missing. If it's not there, you'll likely want to replace it. In this case you'll be making your own. It'll probably cost you an afternoon, a spring, and some bits from your scrap bin - maybe a few nuts and bolts.

    When you inspect the machine, you'll want to bring the longest straight edge you can put your hands on, a pair of winding sticks, and a reliable machinist's square. Use the striaght edge to check that the infeed and outfeed beds are flat and co-planer along their length. Lay the straight edge along the top each of the beds near each side, down the middle, and diagonally across. Lay the winding sticks (parallel strips about 8 or 10 inches long) on the top of each table, one near the cutter head, the other near the other end. Sight across the top, visually aligning the tops of the winding sticks to make sure there's no warp in the tables. Then, set one across the top of the infeed table and one across the top of the outfeed table to see that the tables are co-planer across their short axis. If the tables are flat but not co-planar, it's only a matter of adjustment to get them right - probably shimming. I wouldn't think it's a deal breaker, but will prepare you for a task ahead.

    To check the bearings, remove the belt (or motor coupling if it's direct drive) and check the cutter head for slop, "bumps" during rotation, or excessive stiffness. The cutter should spin smoothly. With babbits, some end play is fine. With ball bearings, end play typically indicates that a bearing isn't seating properly in the pillow block or casting - that can be a major issue to correct as you'll probably need to replace a pillow block or overboar the bearing seat and replace the bearings with the next O.D. size up.

    If the bearings check out, take a good look at the motor - wiring, bearings, internal crud (assuming it's an open frame motor). If those look OK, flip the switch to see how it hums. Should be quiet and smooth. Listen for bearing chatter - smell for smoke.
    Now, put the belt back on (assuming it's in decent shape) or reinstall the motor.
    Make sure the bolts holding the blades in the cutterhead are all present and tight. Flip the switch to see how the head spins. It should be smooth with no wobble or chatter.
    I'd also check the table adjustments. Are all the pertinent parts there? Are any broken? If any have been repaired, does it look like a decent job? If it's a wedge bed, do the ways appear to be clear and lubricated? Crank the infeed table up and down a bit to see how it goes. If the outfeed table is adjustable, do the same with it. If the guard is present, does it work properly, gently springing back after the stock passes through?

    And then there's the fence. Check it for flatness and warp - they're notorious for having these problems. An out of flat fence can be worked with, but it does take some time and attention. Is it adjustable? If so, does it work smoothly and lock securely without any flex or wobble? How easilly will it lock square to the table?

    Has there been significant rust? Is there a noticeable pitting on the table tops? Even if there is, as long as the overall registration is flat, it won't effect function, but it will require a little extra care to keep rust away from now on.

    If the machine appears to be mechanically sound with absolutely no issues and is clean with a decent paint job, i would think $650 might be a fair price - But only if it doesn't need any work. The rule of thumb i go by is 1/2 of a new comparable machine would be the price for a plug-n-play older machine. Check the Grizzly website for their 8" machines with standard cutter heads (no helical or spiral cutters).

    I've got a shop just about full of old iron. I like it for a few reasons, not least of which is having some unknown history in my shop. I also like the idea of keeping and old dog going, and i've been able to get much higher quality older machines than what i would have ever purchased new. But you have to like working on them as well. If you're not into the mechanical end of things, the older machines can be a challenge, especially if they need some overhaul or need parts made up.

    Have fun with it and let us know how it goes.

    Paul Hubbman

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Floydada, Tx
    Posts
    1,941
    Quote Originally Posted by Jeff Horton View Post


    Take a look-see here. I think I found one just like it.

    Sidney jointer 1828
    That is the one I am looking at getting. It is either this one or a 16" Yates he has. Shipping is rather cheap for the weigth of it. Thanks all for the help.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    The Heart of Dixie
    Posts
    4,268
    Very reasonable price then IMO. Of course depending on condition.

    16" jointer, wow. Thats big. I love my 12" jointer!
    God grant me the senility to forget the people I never liked anyway,
    the good fortune to run into the ones I do,
    and the eyesight to tell the difference.


    Kudzu Craft Lightweight Skin on frame Kayaks.
    Custom built boats and Kits

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Floydada, Tx
    Posts
    1,941
    I do alot of molding and haveing a jointer with a long bed make life easier. Has any one ever converted on over to a modern hed, like a byrd cutter? This would be much safer and no longer have to worry about babbit bearings.

Similar Threads

  1. Grizzly 6"x47" jointer. Series Model G1182. 1 H.P
    By Mitch Mitchell in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 04-27-2012, 04:39 PM
  2. Thoughts on the Jet 8" & 10" B3nch Jointer/Planer Combos
    By Frank Townend in forum New Tools
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 12-29-2008, 09:34 AM
  3. 6" Jointer
    By Matt Meiser in forum Old Ads
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06-01-2008, 02:30 AM
  4. Looking at an 8" jointer
    By Bart Leetch in forum New Tools
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 03-09-2007, 08:40 PM
  5. 8" vs 12" jointer delima
    By Jeff Horton in forum New Tools
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 02-05-2007, 10:50 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •