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Thread: More boring again

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug 2008
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    More boring again

    I know we just hit this, but using my Jet mini for 10-12" peppermills with a forstner bit is leaving me about an inch short in the middle. Would an auger bit work better? I bore half from the top and half from the bottom to equalize any deflection. I ordered an extension for my forstner bits, but would the auger do the same thing for boring out the core using the same method? Bit sizes are 1" and 1.25".
    Your Respiratory Therapist wears Combat boots

  2. #2
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    Because you are "meeting in the middle" I don't see any issues using an auger bit. There would be too much tear out if you were going all the way through in one pass. Always back out the bit once in a while to reduce heat and chip build up.



  3. #3
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    When I started making duck and game calls, I found that Forstner (style) bits were not the best thing for end grain drilling/boring on hard-hardwoods. I much prefer brad points. With those, you can easily add an extension for what you are trying to do. Augers will work but, if hand held they are very difficult to keep straight. BTW, spade bits are not bad if kept sharp and they tend to run cooler.

  4. #4
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    I tried a spade bit that was sharp and got a lot of abuse from it. I'm using a jacobs chuck in the tailstock, as it should be used, at about 500 rpm. I'm wondering if the extension on the forstner will wander more or if the auger will be ok doing the half and half . Are brad points made in 1" and 1 5/8" sizes?
    Your Respiratory Therapist wears Combat boots

  5. #5
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    Nov 2008
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    Tampa & NC
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    more boreing again

    I use the extention with my forestner bits and they work pretty good.They recommend that for a 1" forestner bit to keep the speed around 200 rpm,if your lathe doesn't go that slow,then you just have to take you time and go slow,keeping the chips clear.I'v never had a spade bit that would go straight.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Drums, PA
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    I use forstner bits and extensions when needed. I start by just letting the tip touch the wood and when it finds it's center I start drilling. Seems to work for me.

    Here is a video of me drilling into the endgrain of hard bubinga. It is a 2" bit and the lathe is running at around 500 rpms.

    Drilling endgrain

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Burr View Post
    I tried a spade bit that was sharp and got a lot of abuse from it. I'm using a jacobs chuck in the tailstock, as it should be used, at about 500 rpm. I'm wondering if the extension on the forstner will wander more or if the auger will be ok doing the half and half . Are brad points made in 1" and 1 5/8" sizes?
    Yes, large brad points are made but they are costly.
    Forstners, if used on end grain should run r-e-a-l r-e-a-l slowly. Forstners are not designed for end grain work.
    Now, I'll qualify a bit. There are a number of Forstner 'style' hole saws on the market with different teeth and cutting abilities. My experience is with original Forstners and original Forstner style bits. I do not like for end grain, especially on hard-hardwoods.
    Brad points rule.

  8. #8
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    Jim I got a set of these bits from MCLS but see they don't have them on there website anymore. That is to bad as with a extension these things are hefty and don't drift like the regular forstner bits do. They have carbide tips and a screw tip in the middle. Glad I got mine when I did. Haven't been able to find them anywhere else on the net.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Forsner bits.jpg  
    Bernie W.

    Retirement: Thats when you return from work one day
    and say, Hi, Honey, Im home forever.

    To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.

  9. #9
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    Try some out on end grain boring of a hard-hardwood. Give us a review.

  10. #10
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    Already have Frank and they are slick. They cut real well and like I said don't wonder. Did this on some end grain black locust. That is about as hard as you can get without turning concrete.
    Bernie W.

    Retirement: Thats when you return from work one day
    and say, Hi, Honey, Im home forever.

    To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.

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