Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 26

Thread: An exercise in neander

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Canberra Australia
    Posts
    8

    An exercise in neander

    Hi all,
    After 3 or so months of part time woodworking, the change table is complete (our first is due in 2 weeks !!!).
    I decided from early on, that the whole project was to be completed with hand tools only. About the only exception is the knobs that were turned on a lathe (does that count ?).
    I don't normally build things from scratch, I'm more into restoring. It was a great opportunity to use just about all of my vintage hand tool collection.
    I also decided to use all Australian timbers.
    Timbers used were Australian Red Cedar and Australian Rosewood, with a recycled Redgum shelf. Drawer knobs are turned from Blackwood. Drawer case was made with recycled pine out of a 19th century Australian chest of drawers (no restoration hope for this chest ).
    All the timber was re-sawn with my Disston D4 handsaw, sized and finished with hand planes. All 34 of the mortise and tenons were hand cut. The drawer is Cedar fronted with half blind dovetails, and pine casing.
    The backboard, which is Cedar with a Rosewood band, was carved by SWMBO.
    The plan is to install 2 more drawers underneath the first when it's finished being a baby change table (whenever that may be ), so we'll have a chest of drawers for the room.
    Change table was french polished (shellac) and waxed.

    Pic 1 shows the glue up....sometimes it would help to be an octopus during glue-ups
    Rest of the pics are the final product.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails IMGP2128.JPG   IMGP2204.jpg   IMGP2207.jpg   IMGP2208.jpg   IMGP2211.JPG  

    IMGP2216.jpg  
    Last edited by Stu Gillard; 02-01-2009 at 05:53 AM. Reason: More info

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Bellingham
    Posts
    2,450
    Stu, your changing table looks great. I need to look again tomorrow when my eyes are fresher (late for me here). I take it you are located in Austrialia. Big country, what part are you from? Welcome to the forum!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,020
    Now that's quite a first post there, Stu. ('Bout time you posted here.) Looks like an instant heirloom to me. Great-looking woods and the craftsmanship looks superb. Very well done.

    The knobs look lighter than the blackwood I've seen. Does blackwood have light-colored sapwood?
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Canberra Australia
    Posts
    8
    I didn't realize it was my first post, I've been lurking here for quite a while.

    Bill -I'm from Canberra, the nations capital.

    Vaughn - Tasmanian Blackwood has a well defined grain ranging from a deep black to graduating down to quite light shades (see attached pic). The knobs are quite dark in real life.
    It's a great furniture timber. Polishes well, turns well etc.
    It's also an Australian colonial timber, which is why I have stocks of it. It's also very hard, our Aussie timbers test out the finest English plane blades. Although having said that, cedar and rosewood are a joy to work.
    Same can't be said for the redgum shelf. Most of my Stanley planes are of English origin, with English blades. That shelf was a chore. I really wanted to grab the belt sander, but I resisted . Light smoothing cuts and a Stanley 12 1/2 scraper did the job.
    Mental note :
    Must buy some aftermarket tough irons for my planes, recommendations accepted

    Thanks for your kind comments.

    Cheers all,
    Stu
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails blackwood_timber.jpg  

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,020
    Thanks for the info on the blackwood. I believe your red gum is related to (or the same as) ironbark red eucalyptus, which is an Aussie import here in the LA area (and elsewhere, I'd assume). I acquired a pile of it a couple years ago for turning and I'm still working my way through the stash. It's wicked hard when dry.
    Quote Originally Posted by Stu Gillard View Post
    Mental note :
    Must buy some aftermarket tough irons for my planes, recommendations accepted
    I'm a neander novice, but I've been real happy so far with the Hock cryo-treated A2 iron I got for my granddad's old Stanley Bailey No. 3. Here's a discussion we had a while back about plane irons...

    http://familywoodworking.org/forums/...ead.php?t=8540
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    Welcome to the Family Stu

    That is a great first post, and an even better piece of work

    The carving on the headboard is very nice, does your wife do a lot of carving? You two will make quite the team!

    First kid on the way eh? Well your life is going to change

    All with handtools, that will keep you in shape.

    I look forward to more from you Stu, glad to have you here
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Canberra Australia
    Posts
    8
    Thanks for that link Vaughn...

    I had considered Hock irons, but I was a bit worried about having to get new chipbreakers, longer cap iron screws, opening the mouth etc. They are a lot thicker than the original Stanley irons. Stanley did make HSS irons for the Australian market. I have one of those in my No 5, and it works very well. But gee they're expensive now days.
    Most of my restoration work involves cedar, rosewood and Kauri pine, which are fairly soft. So I'm in no great hurry to upgrade.

    Hi Stuart,
    My wife is a textile artist by trade. Mostly weaving, dyeing, fabric printing, sewing etc.
    She has done a fair bit of wood carving just for fun. She's also just had an exhibition of her botanical watercolours for the Canberra Botanical Society. She sold every work !
    We've both always had a love of Australian timbers, of which she has rendered botanical paintings of (flowers etc), and I've sawn up

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Plainwell, Michigan
    Posts
    4,857
    First of all congratulations on your upcomming parenthood Second, that is one nice changing table, well done. I just love the grain of the top. Lots of great wood comes from Australia. I am using Jarrah to make my kitchen countertop.

    Tom

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
    Posts
    17,475

    very well done!

    and welcome to the family, your gonna fit in nicely with the group..your talents are very well shown in this piece.the top shelf is some real fine figure,and to have it all done by hand with hand tools says alot about your character,,,great job
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Nova Scotia's beautiful south shore
    Posts
    443
    Hi Stu

    Very impressive piece! It's a great example of what can be done with a combination of handtools, good taste, skill and determination.

    You really have created a unique family piece here. I can see this outliving its original purpose in your home, then passing to generations to come.

    All the best,
    Ian G

    **Now holding auditions for a catchy new signature**

Similar Threads

  1. Next Homework Exercise?
    By Dave Richards in forum Designs, Plans and Sketches
    Replies: 102
    Last Post: 03-05-2012, 07:12 AM
  2. Can you get more Neander than an axe?
    By ken werner in forum Neander Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 02-14-2012, 12:30 AM
  3. More exercise
    By Roger Newby in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 05-26-2010, 02:45 PM
  4. getting exercise
    By Frank Fusco in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 03-26-2008, 08:56 PM
  5. can i be a neander too, please please!!?
    By Chris Mire in forum Neander Tool Questions and Show & Tell
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 01-19-2007, 02:30 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •