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Thread: plywood weight

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    Central (upstate) NY
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    plywood weight

    My back is recovering from a recent injury and while I was planning to do some work with plywood in the shop this weekend my wife convinced me that there'll still be plywood at the store later and maybe I shouldn't push things. From recent experience, 50 lb (as in a bag of rock salt) is a bit more than I should be handling just yet. I'm also pleasantly surprised that my back is not telling me I am stupid from moving my carboy of must yesterday with 20 lb honey and 4 gallons water.

    This has me wondering just how much a 4' by 8' sheet of 3/4" plywood weighs - does anyone here know? I will keep in mind that my body may be feeling more than just the dead weight due to torques and what not as it gets positioned for cutting.

    Thanks!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
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    17,475
    mark figure out what sizes you need and have them break it down for you some to help on the weight factor..
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Lake City, Florida
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    Last edited by Tony Falotico; 02-01-2009 at 02:32 PM.

    Tony, BCE '75

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Inside the Beltway
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    Mark,

    Given that I'm rapidly approaching my dotage, I've been having trouble with this too. I've been using a device that helps me pick a sheet up from the bottom, so much that if I forget to bring one in my car when I go to the borg, I just buy another (they cost like five bucks, but it's worth it if I have to pick up more than a sheet or two). But now, each time I have to wrestle one, I keep thinking about one of these:

    http://www.gorillagripper.com/

    It seems to be just the thing. At some point in the near future, my pain will outweigh my foolish vanity, and I'll break down and get one...

    Thanks,

    Bill

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Kea'au Hawaii. Just down the road from Hilo town!
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    1,357
    Mark it may not be the weight factor that could cause you problems moving the plywood. It is the awkward shape and size that will cause the problem. You'll be stretched out, bending and straining differently than picking up a compact 50 lbs. Listen to your wife and wait for a while.
    Aloha,

    What goes around, comes around.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Plainwell, Michigan
    Posts
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    Or at the very least, optain assistance from 1 or more helpers to move/position the ply

    Tom

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
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    OR you could just get it cut smaller :huh:
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,020
    Here ya go.

    http://tinyurl.com/cvypyu

    I'll second what Royall said...it's not only the weight, but the bending and stretching that can aggravate your back again. Be careful.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    Bellingham
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    2,450
    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn McMillan View Post
    Here ya go.

    http://tinyurl.com/cvypyu

    I'll second what Royall said...it's not only the weight, but the bending and stretching that can aggravate your back again. Be careful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Nova Scotia's beautiful south shore
    Posts
    443
    Hi

    20 -25 lbs per 1/4" surprises me a bit. I don't doubt the information, though. I can only say that it feels as light as a feather compared to a 3/4" sheet of MDF which weighs 92 lbs.

    Incidentally (or perhaps not), the workers comp regulations in the jurisdiction I used to live/work in stated that 90 lbs was the maximum weight any worker should lift on his own. I wish I had a nickel for every time I violated that reg!

    So, by my math, if 90 is the limit for someone who is not injured, I think 75 is probably pushing it when you're still mending.
    All the best,
    Ian G

    **Now holding auditions for a catchy new signature**

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