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Thread: first drill press

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    St. Louis, MO
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    first drill press

    One other little project we're working on in Hubbman's Hide-a-way - a small drill press rebuild for my 6 year old.

    A couple of weekends ago Nick (my son) and i were walking through a resale shop full of building materials (Habitat for Humanity "Restore") looking for a kitchen wall cabinet to hang downstairs. No luck there, but when we turned the corner, there, gleaming as if illuminated from the heavens - a beacon of joy - was an old rusty 9" bench top drill press, no motor. He immediately started in "wouldn't that fit perfectly on my workbench, Dad?". "Don't you think that would be pretty useful, Dad?". "I'll bet that would work out just great, don't you Dad?"

    OK, OK. I gave it a look over - Craftsman / King Seeley made. Everything was there except the motor, but it's one of those with the motor mounted on the bench anyway, so i wasn't very surprised. New bearings were in order. No biggie, i've never seen such a basic little drill press - cintered bronze bearings througout except for a ball thrust bearing. It's a light duty machine - perfect for a kid.

    But there's no price tag.

    I tell Nick that if it's more than $10, we're not buying it (i know, i'm cheap). We find an employee to ask about it. He looks at it and say's "how bout ten bucks?" I look back at Nick, who's grinning ear to ear. I have no doubt that if the guy gave a higher number, my 6 year old would have jumped in to haggle him down.

    We brought it home and have been working on it a little bit here and there. I'll post pics when we've got it running (should be soon), but i thought someone out there might relate to the story.

    This is a multi-generational rebuild project. My dad has helped me with others, but this is the first time my son has his hand in it. Dad reinforced a weak part, my son has helped with cleanup and repainting, and i'm doing most of the dis / re assembly (with proper 6 year old supervision, of course).

    I think i'll scrounge up a clamping mechanism or two so he doesn't wind up holding anything with his bare hands. That would be good practice for me as well. Hmmm.

    Paul Hubbman
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Nick's 1st press.jpg  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
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    17,475
    thats the way to carry on a family tradition paul
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    ABQ NM
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    30,020
    Very cool, Paul. I'm sure that drill press will be remembered long after it's been replaced by something bigger.
    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Hubbman View Post
    ...I think i'll scrounge up a clamping mechanism or two so he doesn't wind up holding anything with his bare hands...
    Based on recent experience, I'd definitely vote for that idea.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Plainwell, Michigan
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    4,857
    Wow your young son sure sounds like he's already bit buy the wood bug Really cool Paul Great family project. Something you all will remember If that is the drill, be sure to put a guard around the belts and pulleys, don't want his hands wound up there either.

  5. #5
    Hi Paul
    Befor I was a woodbutcher I worked in a mirror shop putting mirror on Yatchets. We had one of those but we used it for cutting holes in glass. It was a nice DP for our use.....nice score
    Reg

  6. #6
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    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
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    12,264
    Youre da man Paul. Great project.
    cheers

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    St. Louis, MO
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    Well, i'm a bit late with the update. The press has been done for a few weeks now. Nick picked out the color, we built a base, and wired it up with a foot switch.

    Now he's showing everyone who stops by the house his work bench and new prized posession. Oh, and he's making swiss cheese out of the scrab bin contents.

    paulh
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails pic 1.JPG   pic 2.JPG  

  8. #8
    Looks good Paul. Take all that saw dust he is makeing and put it in the garden for some veggies. Might even get him started in gardening too
    Reg

  9. #9
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    Delton, Michigan
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    Quote Originally Posted by Reg Mitchell View Post
    Looks good Paul. Take all that saw dust he is makeing and put it in the garden for some veggies. Might even get him started in gardening too
    Reg
    here is a ignorant question reg,,, you are sayun that all the lanner chips and the saw dust i have been burning or haulng away is good for gardens???? if so my brother needs alot specise doesnt matter?

    oh and paul thats the way to bring up young into the tool world,, someday he will do the same for his offspring ... good job DAD!!!!
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Whittier, CA, USA
    Posts
    512
    Wow! That's awesome your son has taken such an interest in getting his own real tools. At this point my 3 and 5 year old daughters are using a vibrating sander and the shop vac to help me out in the shop.

    Do you clamp down your son's projects down for him to drill? How do you make certain he respects the exposed belt and pulley system?

    Quote Originally Posted by larry merlau View Post
    here is a ignorant question reg,,, you are sayun that all the lanner chips and the saw dust i have been burning or haulng away is good for gardens???? if so my brother needs alot specise doesnt matter?

    oh and paul thats the way to bring up young into the tool world,, someday he will do the same for his offspring ... good job DAD!!!!
    It's best to compost the chips and sawdust first as it can deplete the nitrogen in the surrounding soil for a while as it decomposes. But as part of the dry component in composting, chips and sawdust work great. (No plywood or fiber boards though).

    Cheers,
    Last edited by Dan Gonzales; 03-29-2009 at 05:30 PM.
    Dan Gonzales
    Whittier, CA, USA
    Dona nobis pacem

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