Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: more powderhorns

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
    Posts
    11,833

    more powderhorns

    My new avatar stirred some interest so I thought I would share more of my powderhorns. The pair was given to me by my wife. They are fairly costly, she bought them separately several years apart. They are actually relief carved, not scrimshawed. Carving on horn can only be described as beyond difficult. Horn has grain, using a knife across the grain is near impossible for the beginner. These were carved by George VanDriesche. I believe George passed away a few years ago. He was a fine person. He was not a tall man but was very muscular, particularly in his forearms and hands. Making those cuts required great pressure. He was an artist almost alone at this skill. I use these horns regularly and they have taken an age patina as a result. I'm very proud of them. When not in use they stay in the gun safe. The horns hanging are part of the rest of my collection. Some are unique, some are ordinary and a couple have special meaning for me. I like powderhorns. Don't ask why. I make no excuses. Folks is funny critters.
    p.s. sorry for the poor photo. it is confusing against the ceiling of what I laughingly call my office.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails horns.jpg   George VanD horns.jpg  

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,020
    Wow, the carved pair is remarkable. Aside from the great carving, the plugs at the big end (there's surely a name for that part) had to have been very carefully fitted. Very impressive.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    2,668
    I looked at the image first and thought that the image was burned, but then I read your post.

    You said that you use them regularly.........is it used for hunting?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
    Posts
    11,833
    Quote Originally Posted by Mohammad Madha View Post
    I looked at the image first and thought that the image was burned, but then I read your post.

    You said that you use them regularly.........is it used for hunting?
    Wife and I are avid muzzle loading rifle shooters. I also do reenactments, presentations and rendezvous, plus hunting. I have slowed down a bit in recent years but for many years hardly a week went by that I didn't use the horns, and my rifle. They are well used.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
    Posts
    11,833
    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn McMillan View Post
    Wow, the carved pair is remarkable. Aside from the great carving, the plugs at the big end (there's surely a name for that part) had to have been very carefully fitted. Very impressive.
    No fancy name, just end plugs. And, yes, well fitted.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    13,361
    Those are pretty darn impressive.

    It's nice to see something so precious actually used in the way they were intended.
    Programmer - An organism that turns coffee into software.
    If all your friends are exactly like you, What an un-interesting life it must be.
    "A door is what a dog is perpetually on the wrong side of" Ogden Nash


  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    Grew up here in south Ms...the "Pinebelt"
    Posts
    42

    echo of the horn

    In my younger days following some old coonhunters through the Leaf River swamp I would marvel at the horns used to call the dogs up. They are quite difficult to blow. Any idea where a horn for this purpose could be procured?
    BTY, I have never seen any that looked as good as these!
    "Humility is a strange thing, once you think you have it, you have lost it"

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    Billings Missouri near Springfield Mo
    Posts
    4,552
    Man Frank those are a fantastic score your a lucky man
    Jay

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
    Posts
    12,260
    Hi Frank

    About the horns, when you pour powder into the barrel how do you measure it out. I was trying to understand this a few days ago while talking with a visitor I had who owned and shoots (for fun) a black powder revolver. He indicated their was some sort of dosing device but I dont see how that was incorporated into a horn. Any chance you could show us the interior of one of these or are they all sealed.

    Great horns and carving. Take a look at my avatar and you will understand why this is another item on my bucket list. Except I always wanted to buy a kit and make up an old kentucky frontiersman rifle with all the brass trimmings (which he probably never had).

    So much to do too little time and definitely not the money at least right now.

    Thanks for sharing you got a nice collection there.
    cheers

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
    Posts
    11,833
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Keeble View Post
    Hi Frank

    About the horns, when you pour powder into the barrel how do you measure it out. I was trying to understand this a few days ago while talking with a visitor I had who owned and shoots (for fun) a black powder revolver. He indicated their was some sort of dosing device but I dont see how that was incorporated into a horn. Any chance you could show us the interior of one of these or are they all sealed.

    Great horns and carving. Take a look at my avatar and you will understand why this is another item on my bucket list. Except I always wanted to buy a kit and make up an old kentucky frontiersman rifle with all the brass trimmings (which he probably never had).

    So much to do too little time and definitely not the money at least right now.

    Thanks for sharing you got a nice collection there.

    Rob, for safety, a powder measure is always used. At the range for formal target shooting, I use an adjustable brass measure. Hunting or at rendezvous, I'll use wood ones I make or something from a horn tip.
    Pouring directly from the horn into the barrel is one of the biggest 'no-no's' in black powder shooting.
    If there is a lingering hot coal in the barrel and you pour directly from the flask you could have the whole thing blow up in yer face. That can ruin the whole day fer ye.
    If yer pouring from a measure there is just a big, scary, flash off at the muzzle. And, a wise shooter doesn't keep his face hanging over the muzzle while loading.
    Loading for a revolver is sometimes done differently but I don't recommend it. Those revolver flask/spout measures are for use in war where folks got hurt. Potentially dangerous.
    They are all sealed. Nothing so show inside, just bare horn.
    BTW, there is no law that sez it has to be cow horn. Bison, mountain sheep, goat, anything naturally found on this continent is just fine.
    If you have bp or muzzle loading questions, ask me anytime.
    To keep this from getting too long, I'll pm you later.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •