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Thread: Crib Delima

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
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    Indiana
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    Crib Delima

    Well the wife and I got talking about the crib last night and we starting figuring out how we wanted it to look, I explained that the tools I have donít do "curvesĒ I have a router but thatís not going to work all that well cutting out such a large piece probably But she wants the crib to look like the attached picture; the headboard has the biggest curve in it. She understands that this will probably be imposable for me to do it with what I have but wanted me to look into it and ask around for a way I could pull it off, if not we will just redesign it with a flat top headboard.

    I know I donít have the money for a large band saw, about the best I could afford would be DeWalt band saw or Jig Saw the problem I can see with the handheld band saw is the fact its a metal cutting band saw, handheld, not a lot of clearance for the wood. The Jig saw has a short blade and probably not as much cutting power. Oh and yes all my other tools are Dewalt, I try to ceep thing the same like that

    I've been mulling around different ways I could do the curve.
    1.) Steam the wood and bend it, never done it and donít have the equipment so not possible.
    2.) Stack the wood and then cut it out with a jigsaw/band saw. Iíve seen that done about 7 months ago on this forum. I think someone was doing wood work for an old car but for the life of me I canít find it.
    3.) Same as before but first cut the pattern from thin plywood, Tack it to the back and use the router to clean it off after cutting off the excess with the jigsaw/band saw

    Iím still thinking though Iím probably out of luck and should just make it easy on myself by flatting out the design, and I'm sure it also all depends on how thick the pieces will be also. Iím going to try and get some more details worked out this weekend while the paint drys.

    Let me know what you think.

    Thanks a ton

    Chris
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails crib.JPG  

  2. #2
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    do you own a router?
    a jigsaw will cut a pattern well, use the pattern to guide a flushcut top-bearing bit, cut from both sides if need be.
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  3. #3
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    I don't know what a "handheld bandsaw" is so cannot comment.
    But, sorry, your reasons for not wanting a jig saw come across as excuses to me. A moderate priced, new or used, jig saw will do the job.
    Please your wife and get a DeWalt another day.

  4. #4
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    Crib Delima

    Chris, That band saw is for cutting metal. Forget that one.

    The jig saw should do well enough to get the cuts done that you show in your drawing. Do like Tod says. Make a pattern, out of paper and transfer that to a piece of plywood or MDF, and with the jig saw, cut your design, as accurately as possible and then file with a rasp and sand the edge smooth until you have the exact contour you are looking for. I would only do 1/2 of the shape, because you can reverse the pattern to make the other half. Right Tod? Then use your router, with the pattern bit, as Tod said, to cut your finish pieces. If it would be easier on you, cut the top cap finish pieces in two half sections and add a center block (help me out here Tod, what's that block called?), possibly with a little finial on top between the two sections. That would go well with your design.

    Hope this helps.

    Aloha, Tony
    Last edited by Tony Baideme; 02-27-2009 at 08:35 PM.
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  5. #5
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    Between a jigsaw and a router, flush-trim bit, and 1/4" plywood template I think you could get it done.

    Even though you are partial to DeWalt, I'd really recommend looking at the Bosch 15XX series of saws:

    http://bosch.cpotools.com/saws/jig_s...rded_jig_saws/

    They are the jigsaws most others are compared to, and after using one, I can see why. Brand loyalty is fine, but personally I wouldn't do it at the expense of tool quality.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  6. #6
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    Been looking over the portable band saw and the jig saw since I posted, the portable wont be an option, looks like it 'is' only for metal, as I can not find any wood blades.

    The jig saw I was looking at for the other option is DeWalt, the comment I made was due to about any tool I ask about or link to are DeWalts I wasn't ruling it out due to not being one.

    My other concern about the router was the bit not being long enough as was my thinking about the jig saw not able to due the job if it was to thick but for some reason when I was writing the post about my third option I didnít think to use a flush cut bottom bearing bit with the pattern down, then switch to a top-bearing and flip the whole thing over using the part i just cut as an extension of the pattern to use as a guide. That should take care of it if its to thick for just the top-bearing.

    Thank you both for your responses , It helps a lot when Iím thinking of to many things I totally over look the simple answers Oh and I'm sure my wife thanks you also

    make that a thank you to all of you, looks like I type responces way to slow
    Last edited by Chris Marlor; 02-27-2009 at 09:03 PM.

  7. #7
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    I think you've got a good set of recommendations here. My Bosch 1591 has no problem cutting 2-3/4" ash for a recent project. I set the speed low which increases my accuracy (that's me though). The power is more than adequate to slowly walk along the line.

    However, I would be tempted to use the jigsaw to cut a template out of 1/4" MDF and file or sand to the line. MDF has no layers or grain to it shapes easily.

    I would then use a pattern bit. If your material is thicker than your pattern bit will handle you could pattern cut about an inch or so and then flip your material and use a flush bit to complete the cut. The template bit cut would serve as your flush bit's reference surface to complete the work.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  8. #8
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    a few extra votes here..the bosch jig saws are great and worth the cost. and as for the pattern work goes the info is right on the money. the pattern can be clamped or stuck on with carpet tape.. the jig saw can cut 2" white oak as well as the ask glenn mentioned the new bits for it (the "308" )are pricey but man do they cut nice..lowes and i think depot carry them.
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
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  9. #9
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    Thumbs up Another vote for the Bosch

    Although I really like, and wouldn't replace the Dewalt Tools I own and use regularly, (5 of them), I took the advise of the folks here when my 30 yr old "Skil Vibrator" (jigsaw) finally bit the dust, and bought the Bosch jigsaw. I couldn't be more pleased with the results of that choice. I don't think you could find a better or more capable one for all around use. I agree with Glenn about running it at slow speed for better control for delicate/accurate cuts, and I am still amazed at how easily it cuts at the slower speeds too. Cuts that I always dreaded to make with a jig saw are now a pleasant experience. This tool definitely gets

  10. #10
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    Jul 2008
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    Thanks again everyone, I'm going to be heading over to lowes today to pick up some fine sanding paper for the walls i'm painting and while there i'll check out what they have.

    I'll look at all the options and might even pick it up, but I will warn you I do have a bit of an ocd if you couldnt tell, its not so much brand loyalty as the visual "sameness" for example for the last 10-15 year I have only wore all black, and only buying a diffrent brand of dress cloths when they stop making the ones I wear but the new stuff has to match almost exactly. Even the cloths I wore painting was black dress cloths that had a couple tears in them so they wasnt "work work" sutable.

    probobly to much info but thought you should know the kind of personality your dealing with.

    Thanks again

    Chris

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