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Thread: Need your input prior to...

  1. #1

    Need your input prior to...

    Hello all:

    My shop building is up (finally) and the insulation is almost finished. (Long hours at work has slowed progress on this phase.) Ground breaking occurred Oct 31, 2007.

    I have all the tools shown (in storage in a attached garage) except the cyclone and the various work benches, cabinets, countertops. (First sketch)

    The walls shaded in are in place. The others are proposed. The tools are laid out based on a work flow of wood sizes I would expect (second post), in and out of each tool.

    Because I work at an A/E firm, I will get one the Mechanical Engineers to layout and size dust collection and cyclone. But before I enlisted his help in that phase, I want to lock down all the equipment locations and make sure I am not leaving anything else out.

    The shop ceilings are 10'. Each tool will get a separate electrical feed back to one of two panels. All the wire, conduit, fittings, receptacles, circuit breakers and panels have been bought based on this general arrangement.

    I will have piped compressed air lines space around 20' on center around the shop and will have regular intervals of standard 20A-120v duplex receptacles and reel spool receptacle drops above the fixed work bench in the center of the room.

    Any thing out of wack or any suggests are welcome.

    Thanks,

    Rob
    Attached Files Attached Files

  2. #2

    work flow of wood

    Second pic.

    Rob
    Attached Files Attached Files

  3. #3
    Good Point about the dust getting in the finishing room. I had the door going to the hall way at first, but got concerned that if I had long piece not making the turn down the hall into the finishing room.

    Rob

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,020
    Looks like it's gonna be a sweet setup, Rob. The only suggestion that comes to mind is the distance between the compressor and the finishing room. You may already have this in mind, but I've seen recommendations saying that having 50' or so of hardline (and some properly placed moisture traps) between the compressor and the spray gun helps to cut down on the moisture at the end of the line. Based on that, I'd probably have the finishing room supplied at the end of the loop that goes around the perimeter of the shop. In other words, counter-clockwise from the lower left corner of your drawing, ending at the finishing room.

    Congrats on getting close to done with the shop.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  5. #5
    Vaughn,

    I was looking into getting a refrigerated air dryer to mount next to the air compressor to address the moist air. It can get really humid here in VA. The shop will be air conditioned. The air compressor will do about 25 scfm at 150 psi, so I will find something to match up with that.

    Rob

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Kea'au Hawaii. Just down the road from Hilo town!
    Posts
    1,357
    Rob, is this shop being built for a business or hobby? Looks nice so far! If you are using this as a business where is your material storage? Also if you're building cabinets, where will you keep them while the others are being assembled? Nice selection of tools you have! One last question.... explane the door on the rt end of the building. Is that a man door inside of a larger door that can be opened??
    Last edited by Royall Clark; 03-15-2009 at 03:32 AM.
    Aloha,

    What goes around, comes around.

  7. #7
    Royall,

    -Hobby now, business upon retirement from the job that is paying for all this.

    -What's not shown is a 10' x 50' concrete slab that will be covered that will be attached to the top of the building plan for stacking/drying. I was planning on securing the panelsaw top frame to the wall and thus allowing the two rear leg supports to be removed and thus allow nearly 24" deep of two piles of sheet goods stack vertically behind the panel saw. Post cut down sheet goods would be racked in below the out feed table of the table saw (48" x 72"). Dried lumber would be racked on the wall above the RAS and on the left wall in the finishing room. If I run out of room, I still have the attached garage at the house (that the tools are being stored in now) to stack and store.

    -Because this is in residential, I need the wall to cover the overhead door to dampen some of the sound. It will be removable, but once all the tools are in place, it shouldn't need to be removed. The roof has R-40 and the walls will have R-26 to dampen sound, so the overhead door are is the weak link.

    Rob

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Kea'au Hawaii. Just down the road from Hilo town!
    Posts
    1,357
    Just see me green! green with envy. If you take away the larger garage door, how will you get large projects out of the shop, or am I missing something? Also being a residential neighborhood, will your neighbors allow you to operate later as a business?
    Aloha,

    What goes around, comes around.

  9. #9
    Living in a rural county, there are a few "by right" home based business that you are allowed to do, as long as, you maintain the "right" work hours, don't have any "non-family" employees and don't have customers coming to the shop to "pickup".

    The other secret is, I gave one neighbor a pickup truck and another lots of left over tools and I take the other neighbors yard trimmings to the county dump/landfill when I take my loads.

    I have a chain saw and a chipper/shreader that is ready and available to help neighbors take down wayward or fallen branches. I have a riding lawn mower that I use to cut the grass up and down the permanent 20' wide easement/right-a-way that runs behind all of our properties, all summer long.

    I am building up browny points, with the "be a good neighbor" policy.

    Beside they all know that we don't live in a community with a homeowners association and I can paint the sides of the shop building any old ugly colors I want and drive down the value of all the homes in the neighborhood. (Considering, I inherited this house and thus paid nothing for it, so if the value drops, no big deal)

    Rob

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    30,020
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Damon View Post
    Vaughn,

    I was looking into getting a refrigerated air dryer to mount next to the air compressor to address the moist air. It can get really humid here in VA. The shop will be air conditioned. The air compressor will do about 25 scfm at 150 psi, so I will find something to match up with that.

    Rob
    Sounds like you've got it covered. That should make for a nice rig.

    A few of us here have used the "drying rack" approach:

    http://www.familywoodworking.org/for...ead.php?t=9521

    So far, mine has worked very well with a 21 scfm @ 100 psi compressor. I love having lots of cool, dry air. Since I got it, I've done more spraying than I'd anticipated, so I'm glad I built a good drying system.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

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