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Thread: clean up tips for my new/used Bsaw

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
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    Cols, OH
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    clean up tips for my new/used Bsaw

    I just brought home my first Bsaw and the previous owner was cutting metal with it. There is some cutting oil in the usual places, and I am wondering what would be the best way to clean it up. Thanks for your help.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Delton, Michigan
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    well matt welcome to the forum and as for your bsaw,,first thing would be to blow it out well with some compressed air,, thena some mineral spirits to clean your table from the left over oil and shavings.. but as for the tires they are probally embedded with some metal shavings as well and that i am not sure of the best solution for the fix,, there are others on her more vewrsed in rehabing used equipment than me..
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
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    St. Louis, MO
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    583
    Can you give us some specifics? Brand, size, age???

    Larry's got a good approach. If the tires have metal chips imbedded in them (i'd be surprised if they don't) you'll probably want to think about new ones. The holes from the metal chips soak up the oil, and you'll never really get rid of it.

    You might wind up taking some parts off of the machine for more careful cleaning - namely the guides.

    One other thing to be aware of is that metal cutting machines spin slower than wood cutting machines. If it's "geared" for wood cutting, you can still use it for non ferrous softer metals like brass or aluminum just by swapping out the blade. Steel or iron, on the other hand, need the blade to move slower. If it was a dedicated metal machine, you may need to swap out some pulleys so that it's more efficient for working wood.

    You may also want to check any bearings you might have in the guides. Metal chips can wreak havvoc on bearing seals.

    Other general issues to look at would be the upper and lower wheel bearings. You'll also want to spend a bit of time tuning it up - making sure the blade runs perpendicular to the table, that the wheels are coplanar, and that the tires are in good enough shape to keep the blade tracking well. Check the motor bearings and the condition of the drive belt.

    Have fun with your "new" toy. I first brought home a band saw from an auction about 8 years ago only because no one was bidding on it and it went down to $5. It needed a complete tear down, paint, rebuild, etc., but i had no idea how much i'd wind up using it.

    They're pretty versatile tools.

    Paul Hubbman

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Cols, OH
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    Thanks for some great advise on such little information. Since I brought it home yesterday and just got a chance to look it over some more and get some pictures to share.
    Saw is a rigid bs14002, 3/4 hp. Everyone is probably somewhat familiar with it. It was probably aimed more at woodworking instead of metal.
    When I initially talked to the seller, it sounded as if he mostly cut wood, and had only cut a little metal with it. When I got to his shop, it was pretty clear he intended to cut metal. There was a 1" wide metal cutting blade in it, and was kind of bent up. He was trying to cut 1/4" plate steel on it. After I got a closer look today I got the blade out and saw the problem, he had the guides all wrong. Check it out - the backer guide was cranked all the way out and being used as a side guide (instead of the blocks), and the outer block was all the way in. The blade was being pinched in the back too.



    The bottom guides faired better, just kinda grungy.



    I am just learning about how these saws are set up, but that aint right. I think I may get some new guide blocks.



    The tires did have some shavings on them, as you guys both said.



    They didn't look too bad, so I grabbd a clean rag and wipped them off. They came pretty clean.



    Bottom wheel has some saw dust caked on it. Metal grit and saw dust in the bottom. I'm happy to report the wheels line up with a strait edge.




    I read some reveiws on this saw that reported some vibration issues. Beefing up the base, link belts, and balancing the wheels seem to be the cure.Top wheel has a heavy spot I'll address as I bring it back to life.

    Belt cover removed showed some dust lying around. Also, the belt has been loose; evidence is in the motor pulley, wheel side looks good. I measured the pulleys at 2 1/2" & 6" . I'm guessing they are what came with it - if anyone could confirm




    Overall this saw looks like it's been used only a couple hours, and I got it for a song I've wanted one for a long time, and can't wait to get it set up !

  5. #5
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    2 & 6" pullies, with a 1725 rpm motor gives about 2635 feet per minute blade speed. Just a tad slow - you might consider bumping the motor pulley up to a 3" one. That'll give you a blade speed of about 3160 fpm. 3000~3300 is the usually recommended speed for cutting wood.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  6. #6
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    That looks like it'll clean up and make a good saw for you. Congrats on the good deal.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  7. #7
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    Matt, one suggestion if I might, you might see if you can find a "Segmented Belt" that same size and it will actually run with better grip on the pulleys/shivs and won't have that whirring noise the link belts make and it will run just as smooth as link belts, (probably less expensive too). Close attention to Really getting both wheels balanced will really be worth the time spent, (and do that Before you add the weight below and check it for vibration) then when you add the weight below it will really settle it down. When you get all that done, be sure to add wheel brushes to keep the tires clean. One other note, if there are still some specs of metal showing in the tires, spin the wheels and hold a small brass bristle brush against the tires and that should get the remaining metal flakes off.

    Glad you found it (especially since it's previous owner obviously had no idea how to use it), so have fun with it.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Delton, Michigan
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    as a another help in the tire cleaning use some mineral spirts at the same time the brass brush,, the mienral spirts will softten the rubber a touch to help release the left over metal shavings and then when it drys off the rubber will tighten back up again..
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Central (upstate) NY
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    1,457
    Norman suggested a segmented belt - I've always called these link belts, and buy the red kind from Woodcraft.

    Once the saw is cleaned up, would it be at all helpful to rip a bunch of cheap dimensional lumber to get some saw dust all through the machine, let it sit, hopefully absorb any missed oil and reclean before using?

    Part of the reason I bought the HF 14" bandsaw was that it has a 4 speed pulley setup and I thought that I'd like to occasionally cut metal. Your saw I think only has the one speed and 2.6K fpm is way too fast for even soft metals, much less 1/4" plate. Poor saw. Poor plate steel. Glad the saw is in a better home now.

    For ferrous metals, would it help to manually spin the wheels while holding a big rare earth magnet near the tires?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2009
    Location
    Cols, OH
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    Wow, you guys are all over it. You all have given me some much needed advice
    I will take a much closer look at the motor pulley to verify that size. I may change it as suggested.
    I want to add the riser block eventually - maybe next year. I've got 4 new blades, and no money to get bigger ones. The money I saved went to get one of those Incra miter guides (v27). I figure it will go between my table saw, Bsaw, and router table. Should get a lot of use.
    On another note, I was considering buying one of the $100 tabletop Bsaws because I couldn't afford a nice 14" job. That's when I stumbled across this one. Pays off to be patient and have some cash on hand.

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