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Thread: MDF core ply?

  1. #1
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    MDF core ply?

    I have a few cabinet jobs lined up and was told mdf core ply is a good choice for this. Has anyone used and comment on it? It is almost half the cost of standard ply. The second cabinet job is easy, it is paint grade basic cabinets.

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    Medium Density Overlay (MDO) has the advantage of being more consistent in thickness than a lot of modern plywood. The exchange on the cost savings is weight and fastener holding power. Just join it as if it were MDF and there should be no problem. Join it like the guys who did my kitchen and things will fall-down-go-boom ;-)
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    Quote Originally Posted by glenn bradley View Post
    Medium Density Overlay (MDO) has the advantage of being more consistent in thickness than a lot of modern plywood. The exchange on the cost savings is weight and fastener holding power. Just join it as if it were MDF and there should be no problem. Join it like the guys who did my kitchen and things will fall-down-go-boom ;-)
    No, it is not MDO. It is plywood with a mdf core. I have seen it used a few time and mentioned, but never had a chance to use it. Udo Schit(sp?) mentions it in his book.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Al killian View Post
    No, it is not MDO. It is plywood with a mdf core. I have seen it used a few time and mentioned, but never had a chance to use it...
    I've used it in 3/8 & 1/2 inch panels for flat panelled doors, and it works very well. Flat and stable - at least dry. I'm not sure how well it'd hold up in a moist environment. OTOH, they make whole kitchen sink cabinets out of paper covered mdf, so...
    Jim D.
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    Quote Originally Posted by glenn bradley View Post
    Medium Density Overlay (MDO) has the advantage of being more consistent in thickness than a lot of modern plywood. The exchange on the cost savings is weight and fastener holding power. Just join it as if it were MDF and there should be no problem. Join it like the guys who did my kitchen and things will fall-down-go-boom ;-)
    How do you handle the "fastener holding power" problem?
    I have encountered this with MDF and OSB on rough projects. Screws just don't do it.

  6. #6
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    They have screws (for mdf and melamine) called confirmt(sp?),. They are also called knock down screws. http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=2352
    and http://www.rockler.com/product.cfm?page=652

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    Quote Originally Posted by Al killian View Post
    No, it is not MDO. It is plywood with a mdf core. I have seen it used a few time and mentioned, but never had a chance to use it. Udo Schit(sp?) mentions it in his book.
    Sorry Al. I'm a dork. You stated quite clearly that it was combination ply .
    I have not used it but, have heard it is a good midway product. Cheaper than ply but better fastener holding power than MDF.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Fusco View Post
    How do you handle the "fastener holding power" problem?
    I have encountered this with MDF and OSB on rough projects. Screws just don't do it.
    As Al said; Confirmat screws are generally the answer. I have had success using rabbets, glue and coarse thread, straight shank screws with enough unthreaded shank to not cause 'jacking'. The pilot hole should be deeper than the screw will go and sized to the unthreaded part of the shaft so that only the teeth bite in. Other tricks with MDF include countersining the mating surfaces slightly to offset any "volcano" action the screws might create and using some form of lube. Wow, this is a near thread-jack.
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
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    Thread jack away. Dont worry I always seem to miss read info.

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