Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Fixing "Whoops" Holes

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807

    Fixing "Whoops" Holes

    Now we have all done it, I know I've done it more than most, but sometimes you drill a hole in the wrong spot, or that drill bit is too long.... etc, etc.....

    This is something that I learned along the way, heck, I might have even seen it here the first time, I dunno Or online, or a magazine etc.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	hole_plug_1.jpg 
Views:	74 
Size:	52.5 KB 
ID:	32073
    I got a couple of unsightly holes, these are from when I was trying to use the pocket hole jig to join the two pieces of wood to make my legs, I drilled the wrong piece

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	hole_plug_2.jpg 
Views:	73 
Size:	53.5 KB 
ID:	32074
    This is a 10mm bradpoint bit, the hole is a LOT bigger than the point on the bit, so it will NOT center and will just make an even bigger mess....... DAMHIKT

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	hole_plug_3.jpg 
Views:	70 
Size:	48.1 KB 
ID:	32075
    I take a block of wood, I mark the place I want the guide hole, with the pencil line first, that way, after I'm done drilling, I will know the lines are the center of the guide hole. In this case I made the hole on the piece of MDF the same distance from the edge of the side of leg as the hole I want to plug, just easier that way.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	hole_plug_4.jpg 
Views:	69 
Size:	49.6 KB 
ID:	32076
    I line up the guide block, and drill the hole, about 3/8" deep is fine, keep the drill nice and steady and level.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	hole_plug_5.jpg 
Views:	73 
Size:	53.6 KB 
ID:	32077
    I did two, notice that the holes to be plugged are not exactly in the center of the new hole? Don't matter at all.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	hole_plug_6.jpg 
Views:	76 
Size:	43.7 KB 
ID:	32078
    Put some glue on some tapered plugs and tap them into place, try to leave the plugs just a touch proud.

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	hole_plug_7.jpg 
Views:	79 
Size:	56.0 KB 
ID:	32079
    Once the glue is dry, shave the plugs off, I like a block plane for this, but a sharp chisel works too, a light sanding and you are done, easy.

    Like I said, this may be an old trick to a lot of guys, but I was doing it on the back bench, so I thought I'd take some pics and share.

    As always comments, critiques welcome

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2007
    Location
    DSM, IA
    Posts
    5,719
    Thanks Stu! I have a couple "OOPs items" that this will work great for.
    A man is rich in proportion to the number of things he can afford to let alone. -Henry David Thoreau
    My Website


  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Escondido, CA
    Posts
    5,172
    BTDT!

    I also cut my own plugs trying to match color and grain, and then align the grain when gluing them in. I know this is "shop furniture" but it is also a good place to practice!

    When I bought my plug cutter, I went through all my 3/8" brad points until one cut a hole that exactly matched the plug my cutter produced. They are now stored together!

    Just a thought.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    Alexandria, Virginia
    Posts
    1,071
    Very nice Stuart.

    I use a slightly different approach:

    Step 1. Buy new board.
    Step 2. Re-drill holes.
    Step 3. Repeat.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    No, not all of SoCal is Los Angeles!
    Posts
    9,076
    This works for "accidental" dog holes too . . .
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    Quote Originally Posted by Carol Reed View Post
    BTDT!

    I also cut my own plugs trying to match color and grain, and then align the grain when gluing them in. I know this is "shop furniture" but it is also a good place to practice!

    When I bought my plug cutter, I went through all my 3/8" brad points until one cut a hole that exactly matched the plug my cutter produced. They are now stored together!

    Just a thought.
    Carol, I had a LV tapered plug cutter, but for the life of me I cannot find the darn thing, I guess it is time to buy another one....... so I can then find the first one
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
    Posts
    5,321
    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Ablett View Post
    ...I had a LV tapered plug cutter, but for the life of me I cannot find the darn thing...
    I have a set of those, and they come in very handy.

    Right now, I'm refinishing our kitchen cabinets, and replacing the hardware. The new handles have a completely different bolt pattern than the old, so I'm using a variation of your technique to patch/plug the old holes. I've cut plugs out of face-grain oak, and then installing them, paying careful attention to grain matching, with hide glue. Once sanded and stained, thay're nearly invisible.

    Twenty-one doors and drawers done so gar - 'only' 17 more to go!
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  8. #8
    Per-zakerly the way I repaired gaping holes in a Paneled wall, Seems the "fixit man" dug out a large hole to hang a small reading lamp using Big Toggle bolts. Lamp went away but the hole stayed.

    I made a similar jig 5/8" and double sided taped it to the wall Forstner bit (I used) and drilled only as deep as the paneling (plaster board behind the paneling, Used a Plug cutter and a scrap of the paneling from behind the baseboard, oriented the grain and glued in, almost invisible patch (or should we call it a Dutchman?)


    That is a great way to Un-Oops or to repair someone else's Oops. Thanks for the posting.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    Good job on the paneling Bill, that would be a whole lot harder than regular wood
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Inside the Beltway
    Posts
    2,666
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Townend View Post
    Very nice Stuart.

    I use a slightly different approach:
    Yeah, me too! This is why the angels invented Bondo!

    And it's not just for shop furniture anymore! You should see my pantry shelves...

    Thanks,

    Bill

Similar Threads

  1. SIMPLE JIG! turns a "bowl" on "tablesaw"!
    By steve kelly in forum Carving
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-01-2015, 03:21 PM
  2. "Crime Doesn't Pay" or "No Good Deed Goes Unpunished" ?
    By hu lowery in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-21-2013, 05:57 PM
  3. Thompson "V" Versus "U" Bowl Gouges
    By Mike Turner in forum General Woodturning Q&A
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06-25-2013, 01:46 AM
  4. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 12-10-2009, 04:45 AM
  5. "Cording" the "Cordless" drill
    By Niki Avrahami in forum Jigs and Fixtures
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 10-01-2008, 03:52 AM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •