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Thread: What to do with a gnarly old Elm board? (mostly for newbies...)

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    810

    What to do with a gnarly old Elm board? (mostly for newbies...)

    .,.,.,
    Last edited by John Bartley; 11-26-2010 at 01:05 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
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    Kea'au Hawaii. Just down the road from Hilo town!
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    Good tutorial John. Love your big green sander!
    Aloha,

    What goes around, comes around.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
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    Delton, Michigan
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    ok john whats that big chunk of old iron in the back ground???? the one with the big wheel starun at us..you know better than tease some of us like that
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Thanks for the tutorial, John.

    You call that shop messy? I can still see the floor. That ain't messy.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  5. #5
    Is it that bandsaw that Toni took a picture of in off topic disscusions. Sure does look similar.

  6. #6
    I'm thinking about doing some cutting boards for Christmas gifts. What's best to use to seal those, or do you just leave them raw like that?
    Go ahead and run clown, with those big floppy shoes, you won't get far.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Grimm View Post
    I'm thinking about doing some cutting boards for Christmas gifts. What's best to use to seal those, or do you just leave them raw like that?
    Mike, you'll likely get various opinions, but my recommendation is for plain ol' pharmaceutical mineral oil. It protects the wood, doesn't go rancid like some vegetable-based oils can, and it's easily renewable after the board gets some use. I've used it on dozens of cutting boards with no complaints.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Vaughn McMillan View Post
    Mike, you'll likely get various opinions, but my recommendation is for plain ol' pharmaceutical mineral oil. It protects the wood, doesn't go rancid like some vegetable-based oils can, and it's easily renewable after the board gets some use. I've used it on dozens of cutting boards with no complaints.
    So no stain or anything, just the mineral oil then? Can you give me a run down of the application process?
    Go ahead and run clown, with those big floppy shoes, you won't get far.

  9. #9
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    Oct 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mike Grimm View Post
    So no stain or anything, just the mineral oil then? Can you give me a run down of the application process?
    I'd recommend no stain, since that's something that could possibly be transferred to the food. For the oil, I just sand to 400 or 600 grit, then slather on the mineral oil real thick on both sides, and let it sit for a day or so in a shallow container like a cookie pan. Every once in a while I'll turn the board over and add more oil as it soaks it up. Page 5 of this tutorial shows a picture of how I soak a cutting board. Then after a day or so of soaking, I wipe it off with paper towels until it's "dry" and let it sit for another day or so wrapped in a towel to soak up any excess that bleeds from the wood. At that point it's good to go. Over time and with use, the wood will start to dry out. Just a bit of mineral oil wiped on with a paper towel will freshen up the look, and continue protecting the wood.

    Some folks like to mix the oil with a bit of melted beeswax or paraffin wax before applying it, then they scrape off the excess wax after it cools. I haven't tried this method, but those who use it like it as much as I like straight mineral oil.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  10. #10
    thanks Vaughn!
    Go ahead and run clown, with those big floppy shoes, you won't get far.

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