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Thread: Hey Stu in Tokyo ??

  1. #1

    Hey Stu in Tokyo ??

    How's that CNC router working? Have you at any time between apartos to play with it? Looked like it would be fun .

    Gary

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    Sadly Gary, I've not had the time, and I've had a software related problem, the software they very kindly gave me (it is worth over $1000) just simply does not like any of my three windoze computers, it should run VERY easily on them, we have checked the specs, and it should be a no brainer, but for some reason, the software just simply makes my computers all have fits and crash. I've uninstalled and reinstalled the softer ware several times, but to no avail. The software is made by a French company, it is a "Simplified Chinese" version that can be run in English too, my comptuers are Win XP Pro, run bilingual, English and Japanese and one Win 2K Pro, also running English and Japanese.

    GeeTech, the company that builds the iCarver is about ready to launch the comercial version of the machine, so they have been VERY busy, and I've not bothered them with it. I'm fairly sure that I can use other open source software and get it to work with this machine, but I too have just simply been very busy.

    Thanks for asking, I certainly do want to get it up and running at some point for sure.

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
    Posts
    12,251
    Stu, regarless of the software issues this does bring up the question as to whether this is a potential mass market tool like say a bandsaw or lathe or TS etc.

    Regardless of price and software to what extent do you think this is going to be more than a gadget type buy unless you are a woodshop with a specific need. What I am getting at is had you really needed it in what you do woodworking wise you would have got over the software issues to make it work for you or do you disagree with my assumption?
    cheers

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Keeble View Post
    Stu, regarless of the software issues this does bring up the question as to whether this is a potential mass market tool like say a bandsaw or lathe or TS etc.

    Regardless of price and software to what extent do you think this is going to be more than a gadget type buy unless you are a woodshop with a specific need. What I am getting at is had you really needed it in what you do woodworking wise you would have got over the software issues to make it work for you or do you disagree with my assumption?
    I totally disagree with you assumption

    Once I got it up and running, this could be a VERY useful tool, you really have to let go of your old style of thinking, set up right, it can and will cut just about anything you could need, so you can set it up to cut parts, punch in the numbers, place the wood blanks, and walk away, it will make part after part after part, all exactly the same, all perfect.

    How about drilling the holes in cabinets for the adjustable shelving? Dead on every time.

    Add to that the sign making function, the engraving function, and I would say that in 10 years time, a LOT of people will have this kind of machine in their shops.

    YMMV
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Austin, Texas
    Posts
    1,448
    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Ablett View Post
    I totally disagree with you assumption

    Once I got it up and running, this could be a VERY useful tool, you really have to let go of your old style of thinking, set up right, it can and will cut just about anything you could need, so you can set it up to cut parts, punch in the numbers, place the wood blanks, and walk away, it will make part after part after part, all exactly the same, all perfect.

    How about drilling the holes in cabinets for the adjustable shelving? Dead on every time.

    Add to that the sign making function, the engraving function, and I would say that in 10 years time, a LOT of people will have this kind of machine in their shops.

    YMMV
    Your unit seems destined to be a competitor to CarveWright. A friend has been evaluating the CarveWright ($1900 to start, $3000 to use), and found it (or the software) unreliable, and too often subject to overshoot or loss of position (by 1/4 inch at a time).

    Since Shop Bot has matured to having a $6000 machine that appears reliable, faster, and proven, I wonder if that will become the standard for the advanced hobbyist and solo professional.
    Charlie Plesums, Austin Texas
    (Retired early to become a custom furnituremaker)
    Lots of my free advice at www.solowoodworker.com

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
    Posts
    12,251
    Charlie I also saw a smallish unit that was launched in Canada by Gorilla and they did a deal with General who now is the official manufacturer and supplier of the Gorilla CNC. Not anywhere near the footprint of Stus unit or the Carvwright and nowhere near the cost but close to competeing with the shopbot.

    I asked the guy at the recent WWS how they stacked up regarding Shopbot as competitors. He made a very good point to me that quiet frankly i had not considered.

    When you get to the size and use of the shop bot size units and for that matter the Gorilla unit, the payback is achieved through putting the unit to work. That means orders and delivery commitments.

    Apparently and i say this with the caution that it came out of his mouth and he is a competitor, the shop bot electronics and controls are not designed with easy servicability in mind. You therefore could be down for some time if something goes pop in the controller.

    Gorillas big claim to fame besides other things is the fact that their controller is modular and they are backing the service and technical support of the unit to ensure minimal downtime.

    I guess this is an important consideration when one invests in a substantial unit and puts it to work even in a semi hobby business situation.

    The Gorilla unit is being manufactured as far as the mechanics go by General in Canada from what he told me. The electronics too but by the Gorilla guys themselves.

    What I would be interested to know is how long before maintenance of substantial type for any of these units especially the smaller units.
    cheers

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