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Thread: What is this, and it it worth $100.....?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Tokyo Japan
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    15,807

    What is this, and it it worth $100.....?

    It has "Stanley Rule & Level Co" but the seller has no other info on it.

    Total length is 15" the sole is about 2 1/2" wide by 3" long.

    I've not seen anything like this before, I'm thinking that maybe it is NOT a woodworking tool....?

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    I am stuck in the L shop, and I was trolling Yahoo auctions, I came upon this.

    I also found these...........
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    Looks like a Miller Falls #17 block plane and a Stanley #5C (I think?) with the corrugated bottom. The set is at $20 right now, so I bid on it, what do you think these are worth?

    I know that they may be worth a lot less in the US, but I seldom see this kind of plane here, and not ones that are in need of so much TLC.

    I'm looking for users here, so as long as I can tune them up, I'm not worried, heck even at that price, if I had to replace the blades, I'd still be ahead, don't you think?

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
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    Tokyo Japan
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    15,807
    Well, a little looking and I found that the first one is a
    #70 Box scraper, 13"L, 2"W, 1lbs, 1877-1958

    Click image for larger version. 

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    from www.supertool.com/StanleyBG/stan9.htm#num70

    This is a tool used to scrape the markings from the wooden shipping boxes, which were the most common way of packing goods prior to the invention of corrugated folding cardboard boxes, styrofoam peanuts, bubble pack, and all sorts of modern wonderful shipping products. The owner or user of this tool could scrape the previous shipper's markings off and use the box over. It would be swell to think that Stanley was being environmentally conscious here, but given their fetish for raping the rosewood reserves, that notion of eco-fundamentalism is fantasy. The scraper also can be used to scrape floors or other rough surfaces (you folks in the northern climes, use it as a windshield scraper at your own risk). It has a long, simply turned, maple (or similar hardwood) handle that has a lacquer finish on the earlier examples and a deep red paint on later examples. A japanned forked metal casting is fixed into the handle. At the end of the casting is a carrier for the cutter that can pivot 360 degrees to permit the tool to be pushed or pulled. A captive lever cap, activated by a simple thumb screw, holds the single cutter in place. The sole is slightly convex along the front and leading edges, and is also slightly convex over its width. The cutter is ground and honed with a shallow radius to the cutting edge, permiting the tool to work uneven surfaces; shipping boxes aren't perfectly flat (imagine that), and the convex cutting edge allows the tool to work these surfaces easier. The tool has a relatively wide mouth.
    No one has yet written a definitive type study on these critters (don't understand why), but the logos stamped into cutters of these things pretty much follow the chronology of those on the common bench planes. Other than the noted change in the handle's finish, this tool remained unmodified from its birth to its death.
    Box scraping is a rugged profession, and this tool doesn't often show signs of physical damage save for a check or two in the handle or a break in the brass ferrule (it's sometimes missing), but cosmetically it often looks like it was used to scrape barnacles off rocks. It certainly isn't a very elegant tool, but it is a useful one if you're into scraping boxes or whatever. I've never used it to scale a fish, but I don't see why it wouldn't tackle that job rather effectively. Be sure to rinse and pat dry after use.
    Interesting tool, but I don't know if I want to part with $100 for it
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Kansas City, Missouri
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    13,450
    Interesting. I've seen them before, but had no idea what they were. Thanks for posting, will have to keep an eye out for them now.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    oswego county , upstate n.y.
    Posts
    280
    hi stuart ,

    i have a #70 , i got it for about $55. 10 years ago . it does come in handy if your wood comes with those annoying price stickers on it. or scraping magic marker off , but i only use mine once or twice a year , is it really worth it ? ........ probably not unless your building an "everything stanley ever made" collection .
    what are you building today ??

    GRIZZLY

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    falcon heights, minnesota
    Posts
    5,610
    i thought it must have been for real light work, since it was one handed like that. that or someone finally found larry's razor that he lost...
    benedictione omnes bene

    www.burroviejowoodworking.com

    check out my etsy store, buroviejowoodworking

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
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    5,321
    The Stanley #70 box label scraper is worth about US$35.00, in very good condition. I have two of them.

    The #5C and the MF block plane are probably worth about US$ 40~50 together. The #5C looks pretty rough, so maybe $20 for it, and $30 for the block plane.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    Thanks guys!

    Do remember, I'm in Japan, and these things used are rarely on auction, but I'll not over pay. I've set my limit on the two planes, the #17 and #5C at about $50, so we shall see.

    Cheers!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2007
    Location
    lutefisk capitol, USA
    Posts
    485
    And here I thought it was a cheese slicer.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Dale Johnson View Post
    And here I thought it was a cheese slicer.
    Don't feel bad Dale, so did I, LOL.
    Go ahead and run clown, with those big floppy shoes, you won't get far.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    U.K.
    Posts
    112

    Talking

    Should work great for removing
    hard skin on your heels/feet.

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