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Thread: Volcano #2

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Orem, Utah
    Posts
    935

    Volcano #2

    Gee - it feels like I've been gone for ... 4 months? Must have something to do with the fact that we've been on dial-up () for about that long. Today I got my backdoor neighbor's help in connecting to his in-home wireless setup. Ahhh ... back online (for now)!

    Seems like the last time I came back from a "sabbatical" it was to share my [first Volcano shaker]. How time flies....

    Anyway, I recently cranked out Volcano Shaker #2. It's meant to be half of a set; we'll see if its reverse-colored twin ever gets made.




    The light-colored wood is ash; the top and bottom pieces are makore (pronounced mack'-oh-ray, according to the local turning club member who handed out several dozen 2" cube offcuts).

    Here are a couple more pics:





    Notice that I didn't glue the top on this time, although I made it a pretty tight fit. I figured it would make for easier "maintenance".

    ======

    Here's the design, penciled onto the torn-from-a-roll sheet of paper that covers most of my workbench:



    The design started out as a rectangle (kinda like the first one) but I kept saying, "Hmmm. There's no reason to have a 90-degree corner there. That surface doesn't need to be flat." And so on. On the other hand, the actual "volcano" part is more of a geometric cone than my first one.


    Thoughts? Impressions?

    I never did put the fake holes in the top. Not quite sure how to go about that....
    Last edited by Kerry Burton; 07-23-2009 at 10:09 PM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Louisville, Kentucky
    Posts
    161
    Nice looking job Kerry even if I don't understand the project. Would someone please explain how a Volcano shaker works? I am looking at the drawing but its not sinking in even a little bit.
    thanks
    Larry

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Goodland, Kansas
    Posts
    4,834
    Well Kerry good to see ya back and that is a beauty. I am like Larry as I am not sure how it works but maybe it's has to due with my age.
    Bernie W.

    Retirement: Thats when you return from work one day
    and say, Hi, Honey, Im home forever.

    To succeed in life, you need three things: a wishbone, a backbone and a funnybone.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Floydada, Tx
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    1,941
    Me three looks good,but the country boy doesnt get it. Need more input.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    194
    See the link in the 2nd paragraph of the OP to see the explanation. It's rather clever.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    Very nice Kerry!

    That is on my list of things to do on the lathe!

    A tight fitting top is great, but with the huge humidity swings here in Japan, I wonder if it would work

    I guess I'll have to learn, to chase threads at some point

    the pointy part with the hole in it that leads to the hole in the bottom of the shaker sits upright, the salt, sits around the base of the pointy part, when you "Shake" the shaker, the salts goes up in the air, inside the unit, and some of it lands on the little cup at the top of the pointy thing, and then falls down the hole to emerge out the bottom of the shaker.

    I think these would make great Christmas gifts, and as it is only 5 months until Christmas Eve, this is a timely post
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Floydada, Tx
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    1,941
    Sweet, Now I have something to practice on my lathe.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Orem, Utah
    Posts
    935
    Here is the sequence for making the shaker:

    1) Mount middle piece (part A) in Chuck #1, rough it to slightly oversize, drill it out, sand the open end FLAT with large sanding block. Leave part A in the chuck.

    2) Mount bottom piece (part B) in Chuck #2, rough it to slightly oversize, drill the 3/32" through hole, shape the volcano and fit the joint to part A. Check the fit OFTEN as you remove tiny bits of material. Remove part B from Chuck #2.

    3) Remount Chuck #1 with part A still attached. Glue part B into part A. Finish-turn the bottom of part B. Part off cylinder A near the chuck, making sure to get the top edge FLAT. Take a slow, fine cut and clean up on a flat surface with fine sandpaper.


    ** Alternate, single-chuck approach **
    At the end of step 1, remove part A from the chuck.
    In step 2, leave part B in the chuck, glue part A to it, and do a nicer job of finishing the upper edge of part A.
    Reverse-chuck the A/B assembly into a jam chuck to finish the bottom of part B.



    4) Chuck the lid piece (part C) last, rough it to slightly oversize, shape the inside of the lid ... and fit the completed A/B assembly to it. This is the configuration needed for the final "assembly sanding", to make sure the lid and body will fit together with no "stair step" at the joint.

    5) Make a jam chuck to (tightly) fit the underside of part C, so you can finish-turn the top of the lid. My completed lid didn't want to come out of the jam chuck, so I had to carefully cut away most of the chuck around the joint.

    I haven't applied any finish yet. Still thinking about it....

    PS - If you don't mind filling the shaker through the bottom hole, go ahead and glue the lid on. Or, get fancy and make a threaded connection like Stu mentioned.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    Live in Homeland, GA
    Posts
    11
    Kerry, I agree, nice project. I've made several of the salt shakers, but I like your design better. I don't put fake holes, leaves more to conversation when someone picks it up to use it. Have had a good time with it. Also several request to make for other people. Thanks for sharing your design.
    Sandra

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Orem, Utah
    Posts
    935

    My first woodturning "profit"

    Well waddayaknow? Volcano shaker #2 made me $10 tonight!

    The Utah Woodturners club receives gift certificates from Craft Supplies USA, to re-gift to members as appropriate. The club president chooses a "Turner's Challenge" theme for each club meeting, and acts as sole judge to award gift certificates to the best examples of the theme.

    Tonight's theme was Useful Boxes. I thought, "What the heck?" and brought my shaker along. At the end of the evening, I went to retrieve the shaker from the display table and found a $10 CSUSA certificate underneath it. Score!



    By sheer coincidence (?) the turning project being demonstrated tonight was ... Volcano Shakers! The presenter was Stuart Davey, the same guy who demo'd these shakers at my other local club a year ago, and inspired me to make my first one. Due largely to an unfortunate choice of blank, things went south on him near the end of his demo - he experienced a catch of some kind and ripped a sizeable piece out of the upper part of his 2-piece shaker.

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