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Thread: Motor mounted "breaker" trips on my TS

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Location
    Long Hill Township, NJ
    Posts
    467

    Motor mounted "breaker" trips on my TS

    Hello:

    I have a Jet TS with a 1-1/2 HP motor current wired 110V.

    I bought the saw used and when I was snooping through it I realized that the little circuit breaker on the wiring box of the motor had been bypassed by the previous owner.

    I hooked it back up and used the saw for months/years. Last week I was ripping a 2 x 4 for my FIL and it tripped the "breaker" on the motor. I let it cool off and reset it. It tripped again but I eventually was able to finish the cut.

    Today I was working on a cabinet project and installed my brandy new 8" stacked dado set. I fired up the saw with a 5/8" dado setup (lots of blades on the arbor) and the saw started to spin up to speed and then the little breaker on the motor trips. I was never able to get it running so I bypassed it and made the cuts. The breaker on the is saw is marked 20A. The saw is running on a 20A 110V circuit with a light and the "house" breaker didn't trip. The light I have plugged into the same circuit didn't dim.

    I suspect that the little breaker on the saw motor is junk/fried and I'm questioning the group - should I replace it or just leave it bypassed?

    If I should replace it - where can I get a quality replacement?

    I have the option of converting the saw to 220V operation - I almost did it last summer but that reduces my flexibility of location somewhat.

    Any opinions/thoughts greatly appreciated.

    Cheers

    Jim

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    somewhere east of Queen Creek, AZ - South East of Phoenix
    Posts
    8,529
    Jim, I have that saw and when I was running on 110V it would trip if I was cutting heavy hardwood. 8/4 8-12" wide or when making thick dado cuts in hard wood. I converted it to 220 and have never regretted.
    The breaker is designed to protect the motor, the nousehold CB is not rated ad a MCP (motor circuit Breaker) so it will not adaquatly protect your saw. The cause could be bearing, in the motor, or on the trunion for the saw blade, it's hard to tell or it could be a bad breaker. the fact that you've run it for several months/years leads me to believe that you either are asking to much for the saw at 110v. or you have a bearing problem.
    Personaly I like the saw running at 220 V since it starts up faster and doensn't bog down when I am cutting thick stock or dadoing. I normaly work with hardwood so to me the fact that the saw doesn't bog down it what I need, prevents burning of the wood. Spin the blade by hand and if it doesn't seem free then check for a bearing, other wise if you are going to be doing dado's and cutting hard wood then convert it to 220. I'f you need to move the saw around make a long 220 V extension cord. Make sure your plug and recepticle are the proper type for 220V.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    Posts
    1,103

    Motor mounted "breaker" trips on my TS

    Jim,

    That little "Breaker" on your motor is actually a thermal device designed to kick out if the motor over heats. Yes, they do go bad, and there are probably many motors out there without the device at all. If your motor has never tripped the 20a breaker in the line, and it doesn't get so hot you can't touch it, I don't think you would doing any harm by bypassing the thermal device at this time. (Especially seeing that is was bypassed all that time before with no ill results.)

    That's my opinion, not gosple. I am sure others will chime in soon.

    Aloha, Tony
    "You got to learn from the mistakes of others. You won't live long enough to make them all yourself". (Author unknown)

    "Time flies like..... an arrow,,,Fruit flies like..... a banana." Groucho Marx

    Ah,,,to live in Paradise!

    Registered voting member

    Fighting for all I am worth, and praying every day.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    somewhere east of Queen Creek, AZ - South East of Phoenix
    Posts
    8,529
    No offense ment Tony but with over 30 years of working with industrial motor controls I would never bypass a protection circuit. If the motor is overloaded then it is best to find the problem and fix it. If it is overload due to the cuts being made then then converting to 220 is the best solution since it will half the amperage needed. A table saw is a simple machine and it is easy diagnose a bad bearing. If it is a bad thermal switch then it is best to replace it with a new one since this is the best type of circuit for that type of a device. Hope I didn't offend you.

    Mahalo

    Don
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Location
    Honolulu, Hawaii
    Posts
    1,103

    Motor mounted "breaker" trips on my TS

    I'm steamed,,,nah nah, just kidding.

    I have to agree with you, but seeing as the motor had been run for so long with the device bypassed, I don't think it's going to hurt it any now.

    But then, that's just my somewhat educated & experienced opinion.

    As for going to 220v, the lower amps drawn may help but replaceing the device would be the most prudent way to go.

    I've got a Baldor buffer that the thermal protector device decided to not reset any more. (It only tripped one time, I reset it after letting the motor cool some and when it tripped again later, it wouldn't reset.) It will run the motor fine if I keep my finger pressing the little red button, but it won't stay in by itself. I'm looking for a replacement for it now.

    You are always most welcome to correct, or advise me when needed Don.

    Aloha, Tony
    "You got to learn from the mistakes of others. You won't live long enough to make them all yourself". (Author unknown)

    "Time flies like..... an arrow,,,Fruit flies like..... a banana." Groucho Marx

    Ah,,,to live in Paradise!

    Registered voting member

    Fighting for all I am worth, and praying every day.

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