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Thread: To everything, urn, urn, urn...

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    To everything, urn, urn, urn...

    WARNING - Some may see this as morbid. Those sensitive to such things should not read beyond this point.

    ________________________________________

    As many of you know my wife is suffering from an incurable cancer. Being the very practical and forward looking pair that we are we recently decided that we should visit the local crematory and make arrangements for the both of us, prepaying for the service so when the time comes our wishes can be put into motion with a single phone call.

    While there I was looking at the various wooden urns available for outrageous prices and only mediocre craftsmanship. A dovetailed pine box was $195. We're talking about a box that is 10" x 8" x 6"! I informed them that we just wanted the plastic bag inside the plastic box (made in China) and that I would be making the urns myself.

    Don't get ahead of me.... Of course I asked if they would consider purchasing urns from a local craftsman, and the answer was YES! I described my design to them and they said to bring one by when I had it completed!

    I'm thinking of something Greene & Greene, cloud lifts and ebony plugs. The design is still in my head right now, but I hope to have something on paper in a couple of weeks.

    Talk about turning a bad situation to the good!
    Host of the 2017 Family Woodworking Gathering - Sunken Wood

    “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk
    www.wrworkshop.com

  2. #2
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    Best of luck with that, and I don't think it is morbid at all, it is all part of life.

    Stu
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Location
    GTA Ontario Canada
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    Rennie

    You should have a look at the pictures that Mack Cameron posted. He too makes the odd urn for the local funeral guys.

    See this link

    I think the laser engraving is a nice touch and potential added value opportunity.

    I would love to see if something like Stus carver could do something like that engraving.

    I too am practical and wife and i have discussed the same. Its a reality and i would rather negotiate the whole thing while i still can and i am unemotional about it.

    Hey if one can provide ones own box what the heck at least its not made in China that would kill me.

    Best of luck with the venture. By the way i would not get too carried away with design style. Think more of how to improve on what they have without adding to much cost and work. Small steps of improvement will have them at your door forever. Do the design improvement incrementally. Add the option to your site by the way.

    Best of luck with the urn sales.
    cheers

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Central Illinois
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    Congratulations on two fronts!

    First - Getting everything ready for when you pass on. My parents did this and were able to make decisions clear headed rather than things are clouded by a VERY emtional time. Barb and I did the same thing about 10 years ago. Our son doesn't even want to contemplate our passing let alone make sound judgments when it happens. He has an envelope to open which has everything in it, including the phone number to call, when needed.

    I strongly urge averyone to seriously consider doing this.

    Secondly - I, too, have seen the ridiculous prices for urns and am considering making some for local funeral homes. Just need to get big enough pieces of wood. I believe that you will, if interested, find a market that will be hard to keep supplied.

    Bruce
    Bruce Shiverdecker - Retired Starving Artist ( No longer a Part timer at Woodcraft, Peoria, Il.)

    "The great thing about turning is that all you have to do is remove what's not needed and you have something beautiful. Nature does the hard part!"

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    Indianola, Ia about 12 miles south of Des Moines
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    440
    I think that it more of a serious thought than morbid. We had a local turner in out club than turned his own urn. He was saying 1sq.in. for every 1lb. of weight. I also build caskets for premee babies. When I am building them it is a very sobering time of thought and prayer for the infant and family. I have thought of building my own casket.

  6. #6
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    Most important is you and your wife doing what feels right for you and your family.
    I had a rather jaded attitude about formal funerals but when our son died my feelings changed dramatically. I wanted to get the cheapest casket they had. But, my wife and son objected strongly. Of course, I relented and they got a nice one. As the planning and service progressed, I realized, and appreciated, that this was all for the living left behind.
    Please keep us informed about all that is happening with you and your wife.
    PM sent.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rob Keeble View Post

    Best of luck with the venture. By the way i would not get too carried away with design style. Think more of how to improve on what they have without adding to much cost and work. Small steps of improvement will have them at your door forever. Do the design improvement incrementally. Add the option to your site by the way.

    Best of luck with the urn sales.
    Quality of finish (no blemishes and no 'plastic' look would be an improvement over what they had. They had one Bombay style with a jewelry tray in the top for over $500! and the finish had a sag in it!

    I think that there would be a market for something that was less "Wal-Mart jewelry box shiny plastic looking finish" and more real wood looking. Something that had a texture and feel that did not remind you of Tupperware.
    Host of the 2017 Family Woodworking Gathering - Sunken Wood

    “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk
    www.wrworkshop.com

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rennie Heuer View Post
    Quality of finish (no blemishes and no 'plastic' look would be an improvement over what they had. They had one Bombay style with a jewelry tray in the top for over $500! and the finish had a sag in it!

    I think that there would be a market for something that was less "Wal-Mart jewelry box shiny plastic looking finish" and more real wood looking. Something that had a texture and feel that did not remind you of Tupperware.
    To spend an eternity in "Tupperware".......... ugh, what a thought
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Ablett View Post
    To spend an eternity in "Tupperware".......... ugh, what a thought
    How about a Chok-full-of-nuts can like in "Bucket List"?
    Host of the 2017 Family Woodworking Gathering - Sunken Wood

    “We all die. The goal isn't to live forever; the goal is to create something that will.” - Chuck Palahniuk
    www.wrworkshop.com

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    810
    .,.,.,
    Last edited by John Bartley; 12-05-2010 at 10:15 PM.

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