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Thread: Collet issue

  1. #1
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    Collet issue

    I used my Milwaukee 5615 to cut a bunch of mortices, and left the bit (1/2 inch shank, 3/8 upcut) in the collet, anticipating more of the same work. Today I decided to use that router to do a table top edge roundover, and I was unable to loosen the collet nut. I've tried WD40, heating the nut slightly, and using more force than I'm comfortable with, with no results. I can try wrenches with longer handles, I suppose, but I'm hoping someone has a better idea. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

    Thanks, Tony.

    P.S. I bought the router in May of this year, and have used it only in the plunge base to cut mortices. I hope I can solve the problem without damaging the bit; it's a CMT with one inch cutting length, and cost half what I paid for the router set.
    Last edited by Tony Maio; 07-25-2009 at 08:33 PM.
    The optimist says the glass is half full.
    The pessimist says it's half empty.
    I say the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.

  2. #2
    Remove the router from the base so you have a clearer access to the nut and shaft. You can use a longer wrench but you might try, turn the router on its side snd give the collet nut a hard rap, with the wrench, this may break free the small bit of rust securing the collet.

  3. #3
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    Unhappy

    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Simpson View Post
    Remove the router from the base so you have a clearer access to the nut and shaft. You can use a longer wrench but you might try, turn the router on its side snd give the collet nut a hard rap, with the wrench, this may break free the small bit of rust securing the collet.
    Tried that; no luck.

    Tony
    The optimist says the glass is half full.
    The pessimist says it's half empty.
    I say the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.

  4. #4
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    Freeze it. This migth shrink the metal enough to pull the rust appart.

  5. #5
    Bob Wiggins is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tony Maio View Post
    I used my Milwaukee 5615 to cut a bunch of mortices, and left the bit (1/2 inch shank, 3/8 upcut) in the collet, anticipating more of the same work. Today I decided to use that router to do a table top edge roundover, and I was unable to loosen the collet nut. I've tried WD40, heating the nut slightly, and using more force than I'm comfortable with, with no results. I can try wrenches with longer handles, I suppose, but I'm hoping someone has a better idea. Any suggestions would be appreciated.

    Thanks, Tony.

    P.S. I bought the router in May of this year, and have used it only in the plunge base to cut mortices. I hope I can solve the problem without damaging the bit; it's a CMT with one inch cutting length, and cost half what I paid for the router set.
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------
    Apply continuous torque to the nut before any heat is applied. I realize it may be difficult to apply the heat to only the outer periphery of the nut but that is where the heat needs to be concentrated to expand the nut.

  6. #6
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    Understanding that you've given this your undivided attention for awhile and not intending to repeat anything you've already done . . . Since this is a two wrench collet setup I would feel comfortable with way more torque than in other situations. Just be sure the torque is nut to arbor and don't lever against anything else. Longer wrenches used with finesse would actually feel safer to me than brute force with the standard ones.

    Despite all the wonderful things WD-40 does it is not a very refined penetrating oil. With the router standing on its plate, apply a little penetrating oil around the lip of the nut. Let it stand overnight in a room-temperature (or warmer) area and give it another go. While I was waiting for the oil to penetrate I would email or call Milwaukee tech support just in case there is a known issue with a certain run of routers, etc.

    As to closing the barn door after the cows are out; I only tighten my collet as tight as I can by gripping both wrenches in one hand. My 3 Mils will really hang on with this amount of pressure (whether using 1/4" or 1/2" collets) but loosening can be done with the reverse of the one hand method. Also, never bottom out your bits and all that stuff you probably already know
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    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
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  7. #7
    I have a friend who has a theory (and it actually works) If you use sustained force (hold it a long time) it will let go. I have seen him hold pressure on a set screw that was Loctite seated for almost a minute and then all of a sudden it "pops"

    I have tried his theory and had some success, as well. Give it a try get comfortable apply wrenches and hold on us as much pressure as you cn for as long as you can...
    .
    Good Luck.

  8. #8
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    Glenn said, in part: "....never bottom out your bits.....".

    Why? Why not?

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Fusco View Post
    Glenn said, in part: "....never bottom out your bits.....".

    Why? Why not?
    Part of the action of the collet when the nut is tightened is to pull down on the bit. This occurs as the collet is pulled (or pushed?) into the cone that causes the compression onto the bit shaft. If your bit is bottomed out it can become jammed against the "bottom" of the shaft area.

    I have yet to find a bit that will bottom out in the Mil routers as the hole is over 2-1/2" deep but, my Bosch, Ryobi and De Walts could certainly have this problem. I use O-rings on the shafts to prevent the bits from dropping in too far (or in the case of the Mil, with 1/2" and smaller straight bits, dropping clear into the hole).
    Any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.
    - Arthur C. Clarke

  10. #10
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    Success!

    I used the bench vise as a "persuader"; it worked. Thanks for your comments and suggestions.

    Tony
    The optimist says the glass is half full.
    The pessimist says it's half empty.
    I say the glass is twice as big as it needs to be.

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