Page 1 of 4 1234 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 33

Thread: I have (finally) decided on a table-mounted router

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, CANADA
    Posts
    2,332

    I have (finally) decided on a table-mounted router

    For the last two years, I have been dithering about whether or not to get a router table, a shaper, or neither. Then there are the follow on questions:
    1) Which brand of router or shaper?

    2) If a router, make or buy a table.

    3) If buying a table, which one.
    Today I finally made these decisions.

    Recently, I have been hearing really good things about the Triton 2.25 hp router.
    Bill Esposito (who is my favourite reviewer) has a very thorough review of the router by at: http://nhwoodworker.com/triton2/index.html. He really likes it. And, in a recent review of table mounted routers in Fine Woodworking, it won hands down.

    Today I Visited Rick Thom and tried out his 2.25 hp Triton router. The main thing that I had been concerned about was whether or not the router would have enough power. So, I tried routing a piece of oak using a 1.5 inch straight bit at a depth of over Ĺ inch on Rick's router table. The router did this with absolutely no slow down. Thatís sufficient power for any job that I will be throwing at it.

    The first thing that I did after leaving Rickís was to visit the nearby Busy Bee Tools and purchase the router for $200 (Canadian). Rick has his router mounted on an inexpensive ($125 Canadian) router table top (model B1680N) from Busy Bee for which he has made a cabinet. That table top worked well for me today, so I decided to buy one of those as well. The only problem is that they are out of stock I have a deposit on a top that they tell me should arrive by the end of January. I think I will build some sort of rolling table that will accommodate the router table top, a spindle sander, and some sharpening equipment.

    This turns out to be a gloat, so I need some pictures:

    Here is one of the router:

    Attachment 3165

    Someone in something I read said that the router reminded him of a Suma Wrestler and I can certainly see what that person means.

    Here is a picture of the router and its myriad of accessories in itís carrying case:

    Attachment 3166
    Cheers, Frank

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Indianapolis area
    Posts
    1,697

    Congrats on the purchase!

    I can tell by your post that you are excited about this addition to your shop. Be sure to let us know how you feel about it after your table arrives. I'm sure you will be pleased.

  3. #3
    Alan DuBoff is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    711
    I guess depending on the type of lift you use, having a plunge router in a table might not be an issue.

    I have only one router, a DeWalt 621 (previously an ELU), which is also a plunge. It is a great router, but the worst router for a table, although I used it in the router table extension of my contractor table saw I just sold. I would need to wrap the handle with string as it required a trigger to be depressed to turn it on, so it was not ideal, and yours will most likely handle that better.

    For a 2 1/4 HP, I would probably lean towards the Millwakee fixed base, but that's me. I think a 3 HP is more desirable in a table, and having used a 2 1/4 HP in a table, I would certainly say that's a 3 HP would be a good thing. As long as you don't try to take too much in a single pass, 2 1/4 HP is fine. Not ideal for raised panels if you want to do that, IMO, but can work with patience.

    EDIT: in looking at the picture of it in the case, it's pretty short, and that's a good thing for a table, IMO.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, CANADA
    Posts
    2,332
    Quote Originally Posted by Alan DuBoff View Post
    I guess depending on the type of lift you use, having a plunge router in a table might not be an issue.
    Alan, no lift is needed. The router is designed for table use even though it is a plunge router. The bits can easily be changed with only one wrench about the table, and it is very easy to raise and lower the bits above the table. All, without a lift!

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan DuBoff View Post
    I have only one router, a DeWalt 621 (previously an ELU), which is also a plunge. It is a great router, but the worst router for a table, although I used it in the router table extension of my contractor table saw I just sold. I would need to wrap the handle with string as it required a trigger to be depressed to turn it on, so it was not ideal, and yours will most likely handle that better.
    The Triton is a very different plunge router. Look at the review by Bill Esposito that I referenced in order to see what I mean by this.

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan DuBoff View Post
    For a 2 1/4 HP, I would probably lean towards the Millwakee fixed base, but that's me. I think a 3 HP is more desirable in a table, and having used a 2 1/4 HP in a table, I would certainly say that's a 3 HP would be a good thing. As long as you don't try to take too much in a single pass, 2 1/4 HP is fine. Not ideal for raised panels if you want to do that, IMO, but can work with patience.
    I thought the router might be underpowered too, until I tested it today. I am sure that it has more power than I will ever need.

    Quote Originally Posted by Alan DuBoff View Post
    EDIT: in looking at the picture of it in the case, it's pretty short, and that's a good thing for a table, IMO.
    Yep, it's a good thing!
    Cheers, Frank

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, CANADA
    Posts
    2,332
    Quote Originally Posted by Ron Jones View Post
    I can tell by your post that you are excited about this addition to your shop. Be sure to let us know how you feel about it after your table arrives. I'm sure you will be pleased.
    I have already used the identical router in the identical table (both owned by Rick Thom), so I know that I will be pleased.
    Cheers, Frank

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Charlotte, NC
    Posts
    1,487
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Pellow View Post
    Alan, no lift is needed. The router is designed for table use even though it is a plunge router. The bits can easily be changed with only one wrench about the table, and it is very easy to raise and lower the bits above the table. All, without a lift!
    I have been eyeing those for the very reasons you mentioned! My PC does OK, but I'd like the additional HP. Congrats on the gloat and thanks for the review! That will probably be my next router!

  7. #7
    Congrats on the new tool Frank

    I'm curious about this comment

    Today I Visited Rick Thom and tried out his 2.25 hp Triton router. The main thing that I had been concerned about was whether or not the router would have enough power. So, I tried routing a piece of oak using a 1.5 inch straight bit at a depth of over Ĺ inch on Rick's router table. The router did this with absolutely no slow down. Thatís sufficient power for any job that I will be throwing at it.

    I was of the opinion that lighter cuts are desirable when routing, less chance of tearing things up and/or breaking a bit. Would it be common practice to route something this big (1.5 in diameter) that deep in one pass?

    I don't think I've ever seen a straight cutting router bit that was that large in diameter, but then, I"ve never done a complete survey of what appear to be THOUSANDS of bits on display at a woodworking show!

    Or are you talking about a 1/2" in diameter bit that is 1 1/2" long that you used to route a 1/2" deep dado?

    It is late, I'm obviously tired and confused........ help me out here!

    Jay

    Jay

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Toronto, Ontario, CANADA
    Posts
    2,332
    Quote Originally Posted by Jay Knoll View Post
    Congrats on the new tool Frank

    I'm curious about this comment

    Today I Visited Rick Thom and tried out his 2.25 hp Triton router. The main thing that I had been concerned about was whether or not the router would have enough power. So, I tried routing a piece of oak using a 1.5 inch straight bit at a depth of over Ĺ inch on Rick's router table. The router did this with absolutely no slow down. Thatís sufficient power for any job that I will be throwing at it.

    I was of the opinion that lighter cuts are desirable when routing, less chance of tearing things up and/or breaking a bit. Would it be common practice to route something this big (1.5 in diameter) that deep in one pass?

    I don't think I've ever seen a straight cutting router bit that was that large in diameter, but then, I"ve never done a complete survey of what appear to be THOUSANDS of bits on display at a woodworking show!

    Or are you talking about a 1/2" in diameter bit that is 1 1/2" long that you used to route a 1/2" deep dado?

    It is late, I'm obviously tired and confused........ help me out here!

    Jay

    Jay
    Jay the bit has a diameter of 1.5 inches. I would not normally cut a groove this deep with that bit in only one pass. I was trying to put the router under stress in order to see if it had sufficient power. It did!
    Cheers, Frank

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    ABQ NM
    Posts
    29,083
    Congrats on the new router and soon-to-be table, Frank. I wondered when you were going to finally pull the trigger. I've read good things about the Triton, and I'm sure you'll be happy with it. I think you'll also be glad to have a router table at your disposal. It sure does come in handy for me.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  10. #10
    Alan DuBoff is offline Former Member (by the member's request)
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Posts
    711
    Quote Originally Posted by Frank Pellow View Post
    The Triton is a very different plunge router. Look at the review by Bill Esposito that I referenced in order to see what I mean by this.
    I will say it's certainly different. It looks like a good router...stout and powerful.
    I thought the router might be underpowered too, until I tested it today. I am sure that it has more power than I will ever need.
    And you would definitely know that best for yourself. It certainly looks like a good tool, no question about that.

Similar Threads

  1. Finally got my router plate.
    By Tom Baugues in forum General Woodworking Q&A
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 05-22-2012, 10:47 PM
  2. Ryobi tabletop router table and router combo
    By allen levine in forum Off Topic Discussion
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-05-2010, 01:02 AM
  3. Finally finished my Router Table
    By Brent Dowell in forum Jigs and Fixtures
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 09-23-2008, 12:11 PM
  4. Rockler Router Table and Router Startup Special
    By glenn bradley in forum Hot Deals
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-22-2008, 02:56 PM
  5. Finally Decided....
    By Corey Hallagan in forum New Tools
    Replies: 15
    Last Post: 10-21-2007, 05:54 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •