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Thread: Kitchen table redo

  1. #1

    Kitchen table redo

    After fifteen years I have recently stripped and sanded my cherry kitchen table top. I believe the top had a polyurethane finish from the factory. Now that it is back to bear wood what is my best option for putting down a finish in todays "greener" society. Obviously I want it to be durable AND low maintenance. Will an oil finish give me that or do I go back to oil based polyurethane?

  2. #2
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    Welcome aboard, Stuart.

    Are you spraying, brushing, or wiping on the finish?

    I think poly is going to be the most durable, and waterbased poly might be more "Green" than the oil-based versions. If you've got spray equipment, Target Coatings makes several high-quality waterborne products.

    http://www.targetcoatings.com/coatings.html

    I've used their Ultima Spray Lacquer (USL), but I don't see it on their website. I'm sure they could tell you what product replaced it.
    When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro. - Hunter S. Thompson
    When the weird get going, they start their own forum. - Vaughn McMillan

    workingwoods.com

  3. #3
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    While an oil finish is nice it is not very durable for a table top. Were I doing it I'd use a nice wipe on Poly. There are water based poly's but I prefer the oil based.
    Old Masters makes a wipe on Varnish that is also easy to use an gives a great finish. It comes in a paste version you apply it just like a wax. I've also used that. Just wipe it on let is sit a short time and wipe off the excess.
    I used to spray on my finish to get a nice finish and avoid brush marks but since I started using the wipe on stuff my spay gun is no longer taken out of storage.

    Oh and welcome to the family.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  4. #4
    Lottsa coats of high gloss Poly. I'd wipe it on (not Wipe-on Poly, although it would work OK), Use a cotton cloth (Tee Shirt material) make a pad and wipe on several coats with the proper scuffing , etc. between. If the gloss is too much for you, then rub it down with Pumice & Mineral Oil to achieve the luster you desire. Semi Poly has aluminum Oxicide suspended that refacts the light giving the Semi finish. After several coats this builds to create a cloudy finish. Use High Gloss and if you prefer a semi finish, Wipe on the final coat with Semi. IMHO

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Simpson View Post
    (not Wipe-on Poly, although it would work OK),
    So whats wroong with wipe on poly, I figure is it's good enough for Sam Maloof then It must be good enough for me.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  6. #6
    Every coat of Regular poly is like 2 or 3 coats of Wipe-on.. I use a lot of wipe-on , not because of Sam Maloof or anybody else, but because I like the final effect. But with a Kitchen Table there needs to be a considerable buildup and Wipe on will take too many coats. Wiping and drying and scuffing and wiping and drying and scuffing and wiping and drying and scuffing and wiping and drying and scuffing and wiping and drying, etc.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Simpson View Post
    Every coat of Regular poly is like 2 or 3 coats of Wipe-on.. I use a lot of wipe-on , not because of Sam Maloof or anybody else, but because I like the final effect. But with a Kitchen Table there needs to be a considerable buildup and Wipe on will take too many coats. Wiping and drying and scuffing and wiping and drying and scuffing and wiping and drying and scuffing and wiping and drying and scuffing and wiping and drying, etc.
    Thats actually why I like to use the Wipe on paste varnish, easy to get a good thick coat. Saves time and when you make your liviing doing this sort of a thing time is money.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Don Baer View Post
    Thats actually why I like to use the Wipe on paste varnish, easy to get a good thick coat. Saves time and when you make your liviing doing this sort of a thing time is money.
    Wipe-on Poly and Wipe-on Paste is a two different products. Wipe-on Poly is a thinned version of Regular poly. I use Regular Poly in a wipe-on fashion but save the "Wipe-on" for final wet coat.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Simpson View Post
    Wipe-on Poly and Wipe-on Paste is a two different products. Wipe-on Poly is a thinned version of Regular poly. I use Regular Poly in a wipe-on fashion but save the "Wipe-on" for final wet coat.
    Correct, actually the wipe on paste I use is a varnish rather then a poly. The advantage of the paste is that I don't need to sand between coats, thus saving time..
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  10. #10
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    OK OK LOL, lets get into shellac sealing and tung oil brush on then buffing for durable finish that can give a a museum quality finish.

    Sorry I have not been around much. Preparing for hunting season on the weekends, been sick with a nasty hack for 2 weeks, my youngest brothers girl friend died and we buried her yesterday. Plus a flurried of work has had me hoping.

    Stuart I think either way Bill or Don has given you 2 good options to follow and easy to do on your own in home.

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