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Thread: non-historical rolling pin

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
    Posts
    11,833

    non-historical rolling pin

    My son took pictures of some rolling pins he saw during a recent visit to Mt. Vernon. He asked me to make him one. But before doing so, I needed dimensions and was curious about the origin of the style. So I wrote to MV, the request was forwarded to the curator and, after about a dozen e-mail exchanges I learned the origin. It seems the folks at MV had trouble researching those pins because they simply have no historical connection. They are made by a local craftsman for sale in the gift shop. They are simply a design of his own imagination. Personally, I think it is an impractical design. But, son wants and I made. The style is similar to one type of French rolling pin and would be OK if it were not for the knobs on the ends.
    This was turned from hard maple and 'finished' with mineral oil. It is 18" wide and about 1 1/2" in diameter.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Mt. Vernon rolling pin.jpg  

  2. #2
    I agree, it is an interesting design and quite attractive, however, I have seen before, the "football" shape for specific dough making requirements and the knobs defete the purpose of the tapers. In general use the tapers provide a "Handle" keeping the hands out of the dough,

    Nice work and thanks for the post.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
    Posts
    11,833
    Quote Originally Posted by Bill Simpson View Post
    I agree, it is an interesting design and quite attractive, however, I have seen before, the "football" shape for specific dough making requirements and the knobs defete the purpose of the tapers. In general use the tapers provide a "Handle" keeping the hands out of the dough,

    Nice work and thanks for the post.
    I have made the French style without knobs. I have heard two versions of why the pin is tapered from center to ends, e.g. "football" shape. One is so that the dough will be forced outwards. I don't buy that as the way a rolling pin is used does that regardless of style. The other, which I like, is more probable. Supposedly, since a great many pastry chefs in France work on display in an open window, the high center allows them to occasionally spin the pin with a flourish for the sake of pure showmanship. Sounds good to me.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails French rolling pin.jpg  

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2009
    Location
    Whittier, CA, USA
    Posts
    512
    Hello,

    I believe they are tapered so you can pivot the pin and change your rolling direction without having to lift it.

    Cheers,
    Dan Gonzales
    Whittier, CA, USA
    Dona nobis pacem

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Mountain Home, Arkansas
    Posts
    11,833
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan Gonzales View Post
    Hello,

    I believe they are tapered so you can pivot the pin and change your rolling direction without having to lift it.

    Cheers,
    That's too practical. My story is more funner.

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