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Thread: New shop options

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Floydada, Tx
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    1,941

    New shop options

    Well do to some changes around here it looks like I will be building a new shop. I have close to 30 white pinelogs stacked waiting for cutting. Most are over the 25" + across, some 35" +. I am thinking of useing suno(sp?) for the pillirs and placeing the post on them. If I go this route then I will not need to buy pt post, which will save me a big chunk of change. For the floor I was thinking going with a few inches of gravel packed and platic over it. Then I can lay a wooden floor for now. Other option is to go with a stick built method and pour a trench footer and bulid of that. By the way, there are no building codes in that town. Size will be around 30'wx60'lx10' ceiling. Trusses are still not decided if we are going to go w/ prefabed or built on site. I have 6+ acres on the new site and hardly any houses around me. Ideas good or bad are welcome. Plan on useing tin for the outside unless I can get ply and siding cheaper.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Bellingham
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    2,449
    I am assuming that you are leaning toward a pole style of building. Are you thinking of building piers with footers or friction style piers? I would lean toward the footer style unless you have someone that can help you calculate out the friction requirements based on your soil and building loads. It is easy to over build a footer style and feel confident that you will not have settlement problems. Just my two cents worth. I don't know your experience. Is there a nearby building (on the same type of soil) built on piers that you can copy its foundation?

    Preferable one that still looks nice and plumb.

    When you consider buying formwork (both sonotube and lumber), rebar, anchor bolts and concrete, it might still be cheaper (especially factoring the labor required) to go with pressure treated posts.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Delton, Michigan
    Posts
    17,470
    in your case, if you arent looking for a concrete floor now go with a pole type construction al and use treated poles save your pine logs for the roof sheathing or interior floor and siding. that would be your quickest turnaround and cheaper than footings and stick built..i myself wouldnt waste the money on a sand floor,,raise it up and run joists with treated or cement block support to make the spans sturdy run your pine decking on the floor and have happy feet
    If in Doubt, Build it Stout!
    One hand washes the other!
    Don't put off today till tomorrow!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
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    5,319
    What Larry said.

    Plus, if you use a wood floor, laid on joists, you can run your dust collection piping under it.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Oak Harbor Washington on Whidbey Island
    Posts
    3,134
    What Larry & Jim said.
    "Forget the flat stuff slap something on the spinny thing and lets go, we're burning daylight" Bart Leetch
    "If it ain't round you may be a knuckle dragger""Turners drag their nuckles too, they just do it at a higher RPM"Bart

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Tokyo Japan
    Posts
    15,807
    Happy feet, I too vote for a wooden floor!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
    William Arthur Ward

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    Floydada, Tx
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    1,941
    I gues I am going with treat post and floor joist. Will post picks once I get started. The only draw back to where it will be is very long driveway. The drive way will be 100' long to the seasonal road and 1/2 mile down that road to the main back road. Are you confused yet?

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Oak Harbor Washington on Whidbey Island
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    3,134
    Al,

    So is there power already there or do you have to run that too?
    Last edited by Bart Leetch; 08-17-2009 at 01:57 AM.
    "Forget the flat stuff slap something on the spinny thing and lets go, we're burning daylight" Bart Leetch
    "If it ain't round you may be a knuckle dragger""Turners drag their nuckles too, they just do it at a higher RPM"Bart

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Location
    RETIRED(!) in Austintown, Ohio
    Posts
    5,319
    Quote Originally Posted by Al killian View Post
    ...The drive way will be 100' long to the seasonal road and 1/2 mile down that road to the main back road. Are you confused yet?
    Nope! My driveway is 150 feet to the street, and 0.3 miles from there to the County Road.

    Winter can get to be a challenge. I plow my own driveway, and the folks along the street (including me) then plow that, out to the County Road.
    Jim D.
    Adapt, Improvise, Overcome!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    North West Indiana
    Posts
    6,097
    Jim, I know the floor you speak of. Listen to Larry and the others, the time making the joists and I did ship lap joints, amazing to see as well as walk on. Your feet, legs, knees, legs, hips, and body will continually thank you!!
    Jon

    God and family, the rest is icing on the cake. I'm so far behind, I think I'm in first place!

    Host of the 2015 FAMILY WOODWORKING GATHERING

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