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Thread: Tablesaw safety (kickbacks)

  1. #1
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    Tablesaw safety (kickbacks)

    This was on another forum but I wanted to see responses here as well. I know what causes a kick back but I have never seen one.

    Which piece Kicks back, the one between the fence and blade or the other one or can it be either piece?

    Where you supposed to stand? I know European saws make you stand to the side to use them but most saws here you can't.

    Just looking for some guidelines so maybe I could re-evaluate how I use my table saw for different cutting situations.
    Rise above the rest

  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Beaver View Post
    Which piece Kicks back, the one between the fence and blade or the other one or can it be either piece?
    The piece between the blade and the fence.

    Quote Originally Posted by Aaron Beaver View Post

    Where you supposed to stand? I know European saws make you stand to the side to use them but most saws here you can't.
    Stand to the side. If the fernce is to the right stand to the left so that in the event of a kickback you won't be in the line of fire.

    Use feather boards, hold downs and a splitter to minimise kickback. Also adjest you fense so that it is slitly open at the back to prevent pintching the cut piece will also help to minimise the chances of a kickback.

    If you ever see one you won't forget it. DAMHIKT
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  3. #3
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    I've seen both sides. If the piece on the outside (left) of the blade gets caught between the pawls on the guard and the blade it can come back at you. DAMHIKT!

  4. #4
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    Mike,
    Thats one of the resaons why I removed the blade guard on my TS shortly after I got it. I know this open up another topic for debate but, for me I feel safer without it there.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  5. #5
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    Another trick that I have adapted is on very narrow rips, when I can't use a push stick, I use stock that is longer then the piece I need and then I don't rip the board the full length. I'd rather waste a little material then chance launching a piece.
    "There’s a lot of work being done today that doesn’t have any soul in it. The technique may be the utmost perfection, yet it is lifeless. It doesn’t have a soul. I hope my furniture has a soul to it." - Sam Maloof
    The Pessimist complains about the wind; The Optimist expects it to change;The Realist adjusts the sails.~ William Arthur Ward

  6. #6
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    Aaron,
    I'll repeat what Don said...he's right on.

    I recommend using the Gripper or something similar. You can find info on microjig dot com. This is the best money I ever spent on safety equipment.

    FYI - I'm a tightwad and only justified purchasing the Gripper after a nasty kickback. Still have the mark on my ribs to remind me to stand clear and be safe. I hope you don't learn the same way I did.

  7. #7
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    I have two of the Grippers and use them all the time, on the jointer, router table, besides the table saw. I always hear people talk about kickbacks and why they occur just didn't know what got kicked back. I don't use pawls but I do use the Micro-J low profile splitters.

    I am pretty safe on my saw and I am even getting some board buddies to help out more so I was curious. The only time I do not stand to the left of my saw blade is when I am cutting a piece of ply wood down and the larger portion is between the fence and blade.
    Rise above the rest

  8. #8
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    aaron, all my saw injuries are from kickbacks.......on both sides of the blade...if the blade is able to grab a loose board it`ll kick it! as a rule of thumb if you`ve got hold of a board and it`s tight to the fence you`ll be fine...but, there`s the odd exception to this rule where the offcut gets into the left side of the blade .....there ain`t nuthin` you can do then but keep your fingers clear and hope you remembered safety glasses....yeah it hurts to get nailed by flying wood but never try and grab the offcut close to or from in back of the blade.......better to take a lick than loose fingers....tod
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  9. #9
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    and formica is thin enough to slide under most fences........when it gets sideways it kinda expoldes .....when cutting formica be sure to place a board or piece of cardboard next to the fence to keep the piece from creeping under........
    [SIZE="1"] associated with several importers and manufacturers.[/SIZE]

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Baer View Post
    If the fernce is to the right stand to the left so that in the event of a kickback you won't be in the line of fire.
    Don, I have to disagree with this, respectfully of course. I always stand such that i have to reach over the fence. My theory is that 1) the fence will help deflect anything should it happen to launch and 2) standing on the opposite side as you describe put at least one part of my body in the line of fire, at a minumum my arm. I also would find it hard to push the lumber from the opposite side of the fence.
    Jim

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