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Thread: resaw question

  1. #1
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    resaw question

    I have this nice looking piece of walnut(I think it looks nice), and I want to make 2 small 12-14 inch doors, but I only want to glue a thin layer of this on to a piece of mdf or particle board. If I can saw it off in one nice 1/16-1/8th, I can sand it smooth, glue it on to a board, and have a nice matched set of doors from same piece cut down middle.
    Couple of questions if someone can help me before I begin.
    Do I run the piece through the planer first to get a nice smooth edge and then try to set the fence on the bandsaw at 1/16 and resaw?
    Do I resaw to 1/2 or 1/4 inch then try to plane it down by putting it on top of another piece of wood as a sled?
    Can I just glue it onto the mdf board and put a heavy weight on it. Do I need to prepare the wood in any way before glueing?
    I dont have any equipment besides the regular tools, so Im looking for something easy enough for me to tackle.(the piece is about 1.5,6/4 inches thick)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails wood stuff 1176 (Medium).jpg   wood stuff 1178 (Medium).jpg  
    Last edited by allen levine; 08-19-2009 at 07:28 PM.

  2. #2
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    For me, both. I'd flatten one side of the walnut, resaw it 1/4" thick, flatten it again, and resaw it again. Then i'd take the two flitches and run them through the planer to final thickness. This is really because i'm not THAT good with resawing. Invariably, (especially with pieces wider than 8 or 9 inches), i get some drift when resawing. I get a little better each time i do it, but i'm not exactly a master just yet.
    When planing your flitches to final thickness, you may need to lay a sled on your planer table or sticky tape the flitch to a piece of plywood or mdf so that you can effectively plane such a thin slice.
    Good luck with it.
    Paul Hubbman

  3. #3
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    If it is over 3/4" thick I will run it thru the planer to flatten both sides. Then true up on edge. Next set the fence to 1/4" or so and run it thru the bs, flip it arond and do it again now you have to peices with one flat face and on tre edge. Now you can either run it thru the planer or if you have a sander that would be better.

  4. #4
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    thanx, the board was pretty flat, I tried to level it using a hand plane before I resawed it, not a good job in this humidity.It was unbearable outside, and my wife threatened me to get inside.
    I resawed 2 pieces to see how Id get it, then I ran it under the belt sander to smooth out most of the saw marks, I put a piece of 3/4 next to it to show where I got it too. I might leave it and just make it a panel for the door, not glue it on to anything.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails wood stuff 1180 (Medium).jpg   wood stuff 1181 (Medium).jpg   wood stuff 1183 (Medium).jpg  

  5. #5
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    Looks really god. The only problem with going thinner is try to sand it flat. That is why 1/4" is good number.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by allen levine View Post
    thanx, the board was pretty flat, I tried to level it using a hand plane before I resawed it, not a good job in this humidity.It was unbearable outside, and my wife threatened me to get inside.
    I resawed 2 pieces to see how Id get it, then I ran it under the belt sander to smooth out most of the saw marks, I put a piece of 3/4 next to it to show where I got it too. I might leave it and just make it a panel for the door, not glue it on to anything.
    That is a pretty piece of wood. I'm of the opinion your original idea was a formula for disaster. Making veneer requires the right tools. A big and properly set-up bandsaw is ideal. (I've seen what Tod can do. Very impressive.) This current idea strikes me as the best final answer.

  7. #7
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    I understand, but I like to play with each type of technique, doesnt mean Ill get it right, but playing is fun.

  8. #8
    Allen, as a suggestion if you are going to use the pieces as veneer you might want to consider this as your glue. I had some cabinets in storage for a few years that had been covered with Formica. They were built in So. Cal. and were stored here in New Mexico, a much dryer climate. After removing them from storage and trying to install them I noticed that the Formica had mostly delaminated.

    After doing some research and talking to one of the sales people at my local woodworking supply store it was suggested I try this product. I couldn't use contact cement because trying to line up each sheet on already built cabinets was nearly impossible. This glue has a slower set up time so I was able to position the Formica sheets and maneuver them into alignment with the edges. It has been several months since I installed the cabinets and I see no problems with the Formica coming off. It was a very easy solution. I just covered the Formica sheets with a piece of 3/4" ply and a few cleats and clamps.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails glue.jpg  

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