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Thread: Sheetrock Outside corner

  1. #1
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    Sheetrock Outside corner

    Can I run the sheetrock as shown below and just have the corner piece hide the cavity?

    I don't remember how it was before and I am thinking it was the way I have shown because the "old" sheetrock isn't flush with the stud as I have it shown, it sticks out just a little, maybe a 1/8" so I am thinking they ran the other piece (my new one) the way I have shown. Just not sure.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Second pic is of what it looked like somewhat demo'd, its the outside corner on the left there. This picture was a while back, all the walls are gone



    Third pic here is with the wall gone, but the corner piece still on. I have removed it as well so the only thing left is that "old" rock on the left side of the corner.


    Not sure what corner piece I am going to use, seems someone mentioned some new types.

    Advice on the corner?
    Thanks
    Rise above the rest

  2. #2
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    Yes, you can, typically the bead on the corner make it pretty ridgid. If you go with the curved or radiused corner bead, you'll want it that way anyway.
    Darren

    To a small child, the perfect granddad is unafraid of big dogs and fierce storms but absolutely terrified of the word “boo.” – Robert Brault

  3. #3
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    As long as you use a metal corner bead I think you should be OK. Just make sure that the edges on the bead are wide enough to allow your screws to hit the studs.
    Are you going to use regular sheetrock in the shower??. Blue board or other moisture resistant board will lessen the chances of mold or mildew forming from the moisture.
    Faith, Hope & Charity

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bob Gibson View Post
    As long as you use a metal corner bead I think you should be OK. Just make sure that the edges on the bead are wide enough to allow your screws to hit the studs.
    Are you going to use regular sheetrock in the shower??. Blue board or other moisture resistant board will lessen the chances of mold or mildew forming from the moisture.
    Concrete backer board even better in a wet environment. Jim.
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  5. #5
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    I am using a product called DensSheild for the backer board, its made by GP and is designed for wet environments. I will be installing a Kerdi Shower system in here as well. One with the prefabricated tray and the curb.

    Now I opened the new shower fixture box and found out that the water pipes are a touch to close to the outside of the wall. The new faucet valve is larger so now I have to shorten the pipes that run along the floor you see in that picture so I can move the pipes in an inch or so.
    Rise above the rest

  6. #6
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    Aaron,

    For Kerdi, you can just install it over regular drywall. If you haven't had the opportunity, check out John Bridge forums. They are really helpful on using Kerdi. I used it when i remolded my bathroom in Florida, it goes pretty easily once you get the hang of it.

    Randy

  7. #7
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    I think your boards should overlap, having a space in there will make the corner very fragile, even with a metal corner bead, IMHO.

    If you are going to have to leave it like that, because of the width of your sheetrock and the width of the wall, I'd put a piece of wood in there to make the corner solid, maybe even some 1/4 round.

    Best of luck!
    The pessimist complains about the wind; the optimist expects it to change; the realist adjusts the sails.
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  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Ablett View Post
    I think your boards should overlap, having a space in there will make the corner very fragile, even with a metal corner bead, IMHO.

    If you are going to have to leave it like that, because of the width of your sheetrock and the width of the wall, I'd put a piece of wood in there to make the corner solid, maybe even some 1/4 round.

    Best of luck!
    I agree. Even a metal corner edging does better with a solid backing.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by randy street View Post
    Aaron,

    For Kerdi, you can just install it over regular drywall. If you haven't had the opportunity, check out John Bridge forums. They are really helpful on using Kerdi. I used it when i remolded my bathroom in Florida, it goes pretty easily once you get the hang of it.

    Randy
    I already have the DensSheild and the Kerdi or I would of just used regular drywall. And now I already have the new insulation that I am putting in the walls that doesn't have any paper on it. Can't use paper-backed insulation with DensShield.

    Quote Originally Posted by Stuart Ablett View Post
    I think your boards should overlap, having a space in there will make the corner very fragile, even with a metal corner bead, IMHO.

    If you are going to have to leave it like that, because of the width of your sheetrock and the width of the wall, I'd put a piece of wood in there to make the corner solid, maybe even some 1/4 round.

    Best of luck!
    Thanks for all the advice I will just trim off the old drywall and have the corner overlap.

    That's gonna be on hold just a bit now until I find a convienent time to shut the water off to the house and move those pipes in. Have to work out something with the wife on that one.

    Thanks again.
    Rise above the rest

  10. #10
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    The best installation would have them overlap at the corner. I'd trim the overlapping existing drywall back flush with the face of the stud. A rasp or "sureform" rasp/file makes short work of this. They're in the ten dollar range if you don't have one yet, and they are very handy for may drywall chores. Lacking that, you can cut it back very quickly with a utility knife as well.
    It's probably a 10 minute task - or less.
    paulh

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